Tag Archives: w-sitting

The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

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My first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, was a wonderful experience to write and share.  The number of daily hits on one of my most popular blog posts  Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children helped me figure out what my next e-book topic should be.

Hypermobility is a symptom that affects almost every aspect of a family’s life.  Unlike autism or cerebral palsy, online resources for parents are so limited and generic that it was obvious that what was needed was solid practical information using everyday language.  Being empowered starts with knowledge and confidence.

The result?  My new e-book:  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility.  Volume One:  The Early Years.

What makes this book unique?

  • This manual explains how and why joint instability creates challenges in the simplest tasks of everyday life.
  • The sensory and behavioral consequences of hypermobility aren’t ignored; they are fully examined, and strategies to manage them are discussed in detail.
  • Busy parents can quickly spot the chapter that answers their questions by reading the short summaries at the beginning and end of each chapter.
  • This book emphasizes practical solutions over theories and medical jargon.
  • Parents learn how to create greater safety at home and in the community.
  • The appendices are forms that parents can use to improve communication with babysitters, family, teachers and doctors.

Who should read this book?

  1. Parents of hypermobile children ages 0-6, or children functioning in this developmental range.
  2. Therapists looking for new ideas for treatment or home programs.
  3. New therapists, or therapists who are entering pediatrics from another area of practice.
  4. Special educators, and educators that have hypermobile children mainstreamed into their classroom.

Looking for a preview?  Here is a sample from Chapter Three:  Positioning and Seating:

Some Basic Principles of Positioning:

Therapists learn the basics of positioning in school, and take advanced certification courses to be able to evaluate and prescribe equipment for their clients.  Parents can learn the basics too, and I feel strongly that it is essential to impart at least some of this information to every caregiver I meet.  A child’s therapists can help parents learn to use the equipment they have and help them select new equipment for their home.  The following principle are the easiest and most important principles of positioning for parents to learn:

  • The simplest rule I teach is “If it looks bad, it probably IS bad.”  Even without knowing the principles of positioning, or knowing what to do to fix things, parents can see that their child looks awkward or unsteady.  Once they recognize that their child isn’t in a stable or aligned position, they can try to improve the situation.  If they don’t know what to do, they can ask their child’s therapist for their professional advice.
  • The visual target is to achieve symmetrical alignment: a position in which a straight line is drawn through the center of a child”s face, down thorough the center of their chest and through the center of their pelvis.  Another visual target is to see that the natural curves of the spine (based on age) are supported.  Children will move out of alignment of course, but they should start form this symmetrical position.  Good movements occurs around this centered position.
  • Good positioning allows a child a balance of support and mobility.  Adults need to provide enough support, but also want to allow as much independent movement as possible.
  • The beginning of positioning is to achieve a stable pelvis.  Without a stable pelvis, stability at the feet, shoulders and head will be more difficult to achieve.  This can be accomplished by a combination of a waist or seatbelt, a cushion, and placing a child’s feet flat on a stable surface.
  • Anticipate the effects of activity and fatigue on positioning.  A child’s posture will shift as they move around in a chair, and this will make it harder for them to maintain a stable position.
  • Once a child is positioned as well as possible, monitor and adjust their position as needed.  Children aren’t crockpots; it isn’t possible to “set it and forget it.”  A child that is leaning too far to the side or too far forward, or whose hips have slid forward toward the front of the seat, isn’t necessarily tired.  They may simple need repositioning.
  • Equipment needs can change over time, even if a child is in a therapeutic seating system.  Children row physically and develop new skills that create new positioning needs.  If a child is unable to achieve a reasonable level of postural stability, they may need adjustments or new equipment.  This isn’t a failure; positioning hypermobile children is a fluid experience.

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume One:  The Early Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon.com

And also as a click-through and printable download  on Your Therapy Source!  

NEW:  Your Therapy Source is selling my new book along with The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone as a bundle, saving you money and giving you a complete resource for the early years!

Already bought the book?  Please share your comments and suggestions for the next two books!  Volume Two is coming out in spring 2020, and will address the challenges of raising the school-aged child, and Volume Three focuses on the tween, teen, and young adult with hypermobility!

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Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way

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Hypermobile children end up in some impressively awkward positions.  It can feel uncomfortable just to look at the way their arms or legs are bent.   It can be an awkward position with any part of the body; shoulders that allow an arm to fold under the body and the child lies on top of the arm, crawling on the backs of the hands instead of the palms, standing on the sides of the feet, not the soles.

The mom of a child I currently treat told me that this topic is frequently appearing on her online parent’s group.  Mostly innocent questions of “Does your child do this too?”  and responses like “At least she is finally moving on her own”  When I met her child, she was rolling her head backward to such a degree that it was clearly a risk to her cervical (neck) spine.  We gradually decreased, and have almost eliminated, this behavior.  This child is now using it to get attention when she is frustrated, not to explore movement or propel herself around the room.

Because of their extreme flexibility and the additional gradual stretching effects of these positions, most children will not register or report pain in these positions.  Those of us with typical levels of flexibility can’t quite imagine that they aren’t in pain.  Unfortunately, because of their decreased proprioception Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children and decreased sense of stability, many hypermobile kids will intentionally get into these awkward postures as they seek more sensory input.  It can actually feel good to them to feel something!

The fact that your child isn’t in pain at the moment doesn’t mean that there isn’t damage occurring as you watch them contort their bodies, but the underlying inflammation and injury may only be perceived later, and sometimes not for years.  Possibly not until tissue is seriously damaged, or a joint structure is injured.  Nobody wants that to happen. Read   Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing.  If you think that there is a chance that your child is more than just loose-limbed, ask your therapist to read Could Your Pediatric Therapy Patient Have a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue? and get their opinion on whether to pursue more evaluations.  Some causes of hypermobility have effects on other parts of the body.  An informed parent is the best defense.

Here is what you can do about all those awkward postures:

  • Discuss this behavior with your OT or PT, or with both of them.  If they haven’t seen a particular behavior, take a photo or video on your phone.
  • Your professional team should be able to explain the risks, and help you come up with a plan.  For the child I mentioned above, we placed her on a cushion in a position where she could not initiate this extreme cervical hyperextension.  Then we used Dr. Harvey Karp’s “kind ignoring” strategy.  We turned away from her for a few seconds, and as soon as she stopped fussing, we offered a smile and a fun activity.  After a few tries, she got the message and the fussing was only seconds.  And it happens very infrequently now, not multiple times per day.
  • Inform everyone that cares for your child about your plan to respond to these behaviors, to ensure consistency.  Even nonverbal children learn routines and read body language.  Just one adult who ignores the behavior will make getting rid of a behavior much, much harder.
  • Find out as much as you can about safe positioning and movement.  Your therapists are experts in this area.  Their ideas may not be complicated, and they will have practical suggestions for you.  I will admit that not all therapists will approach you on this subject.  You may have to initiate this discussion and request their help.  There are posts on this blog that could help you start a conversation.  Read Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) and Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers  and How To Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit”.  Educate yourself so that you know how to respond when your child develops a new movement pattern that creates a new risk.  Kids are creative, but proactive parents can respond effectively!!

Looking for more information on hypermobility?

I wrote 2 e-books for you!

My first, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is your guide to helping your child develop independence and safety from birth through age 5.  Filled with practical strategies to help parents understand the complexities of hypermobility, it empowers parents every step of the way.  In addition to addressing all the basic self-care skills kids need to learn, it covers selecting chairs, trikes, even pajamas!  There are checklists for potty training and forms that parents can use to help communicate with teachers, therapists, family members…even doctors!

“Dr. Google” isn’t helping parents figure out how to help their kiss with PWS, SPD, ASD, Down syndrome, and all the other diagnoses that result in significant joint hypermobility.  This is the book that provides real answers in everyday language, not medical jargon.

Read more about this book, and get a peek at part of chapter 3 on positioning for success by reading The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

This unique e-book is available on Amazon as a read-only download or on Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download.  Feel more empowered and confident as a parent…today!

Is Your Hypermobile Child Older Than 5?  This is the E-book for You!

The jointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume Two: The School Years is a larger, more comprehensive book that helps the parents and therapists of older children ages 6-12 navigate school needs, build full ADL independence, and increase safety in all areas of life, including sports participation.  Need to know how to pick the right chair, desk, sport, even musical instrument?  Got it.  Want to feel empowered, not aggravated, at medical appointments?  Got that too!  There are forms and checklists that parents can use to improve school meetings and therapists can use for home programs and professional presentations.  Read more about it here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

Get my newest book today on  Amazon .  Don’t have a Kindle?  Don’t worry:  Amazon has an easy method to load it onto your iPhone or iPad!

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Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters)

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Children who sit on the floor with their thighs rolled inward and their calves rotated out to the sides are told that they are “W-sitting”.  Parents are told to reposition their kids immediately.  There are even garments like Hip Helpers that make it nearly impossible to sit in this manner.  Some therapists get practically apoplectic when they see kids sitting this way.  Not me; I prefer to be a stealth ninja therapist: create situations in which the child wants to reposition themselves.

I get asked about W-sitting no less than 3x/week, so I though I would post some information about w-sitting, and some simple ways to address this without aggravating your child or yourself:

  1. This is not an abnormal sitting pattern.  Using it all the time, and being unable to sit with stability and comfort in other positions…that’s the real problem.  Typically-developing kids actually sit like this from time to time.  When children use this position constantly, they are telling therapists something very important about how they use their bodies.  But abnormal?  Nah.
  2. Persistent W-sitting isn’t without consequence, just because it isn’t painful to your child.  As a child sits in this position day after day, some muscles and ligaments are becoming overstretched.  This creates points of weakness and instability, on top of any hypermobility that they may already display.  Other muscles and ligaments are becoming shorter and tighter.  This makes it harder for them to have a wide variety of movements and move smoothly from position to position.  Their options for rest and activity just decreased.  Oops.  And they don’t feel uncomfortable in that position.  If you aren’t hypermobile yourself, you might not believe me.  Here is an explanation:  Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way.
  3. Sitting this way locks a child into a too-static, too-stable sitting position.  This appeals to the wobbly child, the weak child, and the fearful child, but it makes it harder for them to shift and change position.  Especially in early childhood, developing coordination is all about being able to move easily, quickly and with control.  There are better choices.
  4. A child who persistently W-sits is likely to get up and walk with an awkward gait pattern.   All that over-stretching and over-tightening isn’t going to go away once they are on their feet.  You will see the effects as they walk and run.  It is the (bad) gift that keeps on giving.

What can you do?

Well, good physical and occupational therapy can make a huge difference, but for today, start by reducing the amount of time they spend on the floor.  There are other positions that allow them to play and build motor control:

  • Encourage them to stand to play.  They can stand at a table, they can stand at the couch, they can stand on a balance disc.  Standing, even standing while gently leaning on a surface, could be helping them more than W-sitting.
  • Give them a good chair or bench to sit on.  I am a big fan of footstools for toddlers and preschoolers.  They are stable and often have non-skid surfaces that help them stay sitting.  They key is making sure their feet can be placed flat on the floor with their thighs at or close to level with the floor.  This should help them activate their trunk and hip musculature effectively.
  • Try prone.  AKA “tummy time”; it’s not just for babies.  This position stretches out tight hip flexors and helps kids build some trunk control.  To date, I haven’t met one child over 3 who wouldn’t play a short tablet game with me in this position.  And them we turn off the device and play with something else in the same position!
  • If your child still wants/ needs to sit on the floor, fix their leg position without risking damage to their hips and knees.  Read How To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” for more details.

For more strategies for hypermobile kids, take a look at  Joint Protection And Hypermobility: Investing in Your Child’s Future and How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Activity Levels in Children.

Looking for More Information on Hypermobility in Young Children?

I wrote an e-book for you!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is my newest e-book, filled with strategies to help parents understand the complexities of hypermobility and find answers to their everyday problems.  Learning how to help a child sit for a meal, get dressed, bathe and hold a crayon isn’t intuitive. Trying to figure out how to teach your babysitter or mother-in-law how to hold and carry your hypermobile child or how to give them a bath safely?  Parenting manuals don’t cover this, and your child’s therapists might not know how to help you either.

This book gives parents the information they need to feel empowered and confident!  There are even chapters on how to improve communication with a child’s siblings and the extended family, with babysitters and teachers, and even how to speak with your doctors to get results.  My book contains many of the techniques I have learned in my 25 years as a pediatric OTR and great ideas that parents have taught ME!

This unique e-book gives parents helpful information to make everyday life better.  

It is available on Amazon as a read-only download, or on Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download.  Buy it today!

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Hypermobile Toddlers: It’s What Not To Do That Matters Most

 

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Do you pick up your toddler and feel that shoulder or those wrist bones moving a lot under your touch?  Does your child do a “downward dog” and her elbows look like they are bending backward?  Does it seem that his ankles are rolling over toward the floor when he stands up?  That is hypermobility, or excessive joint movement.

Barring direct injury to a joint, ligament laxity and/or low muscle tone are the usual culprits that create hypermobility.  This can be noticed in one joint, a few, or in many joints throughout the body.  While some excessive flexibility is quite normal for kids, other children are very, very flexible.  This isn’t usually painful for the youngest children, and may never create pain for your child at any point in their lifetime.  That doesn’t mean that you should ignore it.  Hypermobility rarely goes away, even though it often decreases a bit with age in some children.  It can be managed effectively with good OT and PT treatment.   And what you avoid doing at this early stage can prevent accidental joint injury and teach good habits that last a lifetime.

  1. Avoid over-stretching joints, and I mean all of them.  This means that you pick a child up with your hands on their ribcage and under their hips, not by their arms or wrists.  Instruct your babysitter and your daycare providers, demonstrating clearly to illustrate the moves you’d prefer them to use. Don’t just tell them over the phone or in a text.  Your child’s perception of pain is not always accurate when joint sensory aren’t stimulated (how many times have they smacked into something hard and not cried at all?) so you will always want to use a lift that produces the least amount of force on the most vulnerable joints.  Yes, ribs can be dislocated too, but not nearly as easily as shoulders, elbows or wrists.  For all but the most vulnerable children, simply changing to this lift instead of pulling on a limb is a safe bet.  Read Have a Child With Low Tone or a Hypermobile Baby? Pay More Attention to How You Pick Your Little One Up
  2. Actively discourage sitting, lying or leaning on joints that bend backward.  This includes “W” sitting.   I have lost count of the number of toddlers I see who lean on the BACK  of their hands in sitting or lying on their stomach.  This is too much stretch for those ligaments.  Don’t sit idly by.  Teach them how to position their joints.  If they ask why, explaining that it will cause a “booboo” inside their wrist or arm should be enough.  If they persist, think of another position all together.  Sitting on a little bench instead of the floor, perhaps? Read   Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) for more information and ideas.
  3. Monitor and respect fatigue.  Once the muscles surrounding a loose joint have fatigued and don’t support it, that joint is more vulnerable to injury.  Ask your child to change her position or her activity before she is completely exhausted.  This doesn’t necessarily mean stopping the fun, just altering it.  But sometimes it does mean a full-on break.  If she balks, sweeten the deal and offer something desirable while you explain that her knees or her wrists need to take a rest.  They are tired.  They may not want to rest either, but it is their rest time.  Toddlers can relate.

Although we as therapists will be big players in your child’s development, parents are and always will be the single greatest force in shaping a child’s behavior and outlook.  It is possible to raise a hypermobile child that is active, happy, and aware of their body in a nonjudgmental way.    It starts with parents understanding these simple concepts and acting on them in daily activities.

 

Wondering about your stroller or how to help your child sit for meals or play?  Read Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With StrollersThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!,  Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers and Picking The Best Trikes, Scooters, Etc. For Kids With Low Tone and Hypermobility for practical ideas that help your child today!

Wondering about your child’s speech and feeding development?  Take a look at Can Hypermobility Cause Speech Problems? to learn more about the effects of hypermobility on communication and oral motor skills.

Looking for information on toilet training, or for more general strategies for your child with Ehlers Danlos syndrome, generalized ligament laxity, or low muscle tone?  

I wrote 2 e-books for you!

My first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, gives you detailed strategies for success, not philosophy or blanket statements.  I include readiness checklists, discuss issues that derail training such as constipation, and explain the sensory, motor, and social/emotional components of training children that struggle to gain the awareness and stability needed to get the job done.  You will start making progress right away!

This e-book is available on my website tranquil babies, at Amazon, and at Your Therapy Source.

My second e-book, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving with Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years, is a more comprehensive guide to managing hyoermobility in the child birth -5 years of age.  Filled with information regarding ADLs, safety awareness at home and at preschool or daycare, it is designed to empower parents, not just provide information.  Parents learn how to pick the right high chair, booster seat, even the right clothing to improve their child’s independence and reduce accidental injuries.  There are even forms to share with babysitters, family  members, even a form to make doctor’s visits more productive!

Find this book on Amazon as a read-only download, or buy it on Your Therapy Source  as a printable and click-able download.  Don’t have a Kindle?  Don’t worry!  Amazon makes it easy to read on your hone or iPad.

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Why is W-Sitting Such a Big Deal?

 

Does your child sit on the floor with their legs rotated out to the sides, feet pointing in front of them?  Is this their preferred pattern of sitting on the floor?  Is it, in fact, the only position your really ever see them use on the floor?  Well then, you have yourself a W-sitter.  And it might not be the death knell to development that you may have been led to believe.  But here is why it can affect your child’s walking and sitting, and here are some easy ways to address this issue.

“W” sitting is not an abnormal sitting pattern.  Let me repeat and refine that: it is not abnormal for young children to sit in that position at times throughout the day.  It is a very stable position that allows them to reach forward for toys placed directly in front of them.  If your child uses a variety of sitting patterns, and you have no indication from anyone that they have issues with strength or stability, relax.

Therapists get concerned when three things happen: your child uses only this position when floor sitting, she isn’t comfortable or stable in any other position so that even if you help her sit another way, she pops out of it and reverts to “W” sitting or falls over, and she also has either low muscle tone or weakness in her hip and trunk muscles.  I am not going to delve into the difference between muscle tone and muscle strength, and kids who “W” sit can absolutely have issues with both.  But if your child has that triple play (preference, instability/discomfort, and tone/strength issues) then you should take action to reduce “W”-sitting.

Here is the reason why:  This position will create an imbalance in hip muscle strength, bias your child’s movement patterns in ways that actually weaken their core musculature, and over-stretch the non-elastic ligaments that support the spine and hip.  “W” sitting is a self-fulfilling prophecy.  The more this pattern is used, the less control your child has for strong, dynamic and balanced trunk and hip control.  Therapy can do a great job of helping your child build the strength and control to use a wider range of sitting and movement patterns.  This is what you can do:

  • Pay attention to how they sit, and offer alternatives.  Sitting on a bench or chair that is well-proportioned for them is a good alternative.  This means that you have to offer a young child a table and a chair that allows them to place their entire foot flat on the floor while sitting, and reach objects on a table with ease.  Big-box stores do not sell sets that fit children under 3 unless your child is at the top of the height curve.  Look around for wooden sets that you can make shorter, take a look at the sites that sell Montessori sets or school supply sets.  Don’t let the price tags frighten you: these things sell fast on ebay or craigslist.  When your child is 4 or 5, go out and buy the bigger set.
  • Try not sitting.  Have them stand at a table, and easel, or use toys that stick to the wall or another vertical surface for play.  A child can lie on their stomach or even try hands-and knees play.  Use high kneeling at a table ( child kneels on knees but hips aren’t touching their bottom, their upper body is straight up). Your PT will thank me.
  • This is an extra credit question:  Why would you ask them to lie on their back and play?  Answer:  They engage their core more fully, and their legs are likely to either be planted flat on the floor or raised up in the air in play.  Kick/catch a balloon or something equally silly.
  •  Children love to be seen as more mature.  Tell them that since they are growing up,these new positions are for big kids and grown-ups, and since babies aren’t strong, that is why they prefer to “W” sit.  That should motivate them to give these a try!