Tag Archives: trauma

Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?

juliane-liebermann-542688-unsplash

My clients and my blog readers know that I started using a therapeutic sound treatment called Quckshifts earlier this year Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Regulation, Attention, and Postural Activation.  I haven’t lost my enthusiasm for this treatment.  It has made easy sessions more effective, and difficult sessions workable.  Kids that are struggling get a boost, and kids that needed a lot of preparatory sensory activity to regulate and engage rapidly find their footing.

Could this be useful for parents too?

There is no age limit on the use of Quickshifts, and the creators at Vital Links write and speak about treating adults using this program in their training materials.  But thus far I haven’t heard them talk about the use of Quickshifts with the parents of their clients.  I wonder why.

If you have a child with sensory issues, even one who attends mainstreamed programs and is doing fairly well in social activities, your days have a certain level of stress in them.  Sensory diets work, but they also take work to use and monitor.  Children aren’t crockpots, so you are actively administering or at least setting up the activities the comprise a sensory diet.  Kids reach bumps in the road, and kids with sensory issues can have bigger meltdowns over smaller bumps.  Parents have to help them manage things that other kids shrug off.  And parents always are thinking ahead, wondering what effect a new summer camp or new school with have on their child.  Even when things are going well, parents can feel some stress about all of these things.

It is well known that if you are a therapist treating children with sensory processing issues, at least one parent could say to you “Wow; I used to have the same problems, and everyone told me I was just being difficult/stubborn/picky, etc.”  Treatment options picked up in the early 90s, so we do hear this less and less.  But not in every community  or school system.  And if a parent’s parents refused to “believe” in sensory treatment, then these kids got nothing.  Or perhaps they were sent to a psychologist.  When I describe their child’s experiences using sensory processing terms, some parents recognize that their responses are very similar.  They have been told, or they have assumed, that they are reacting psychologically to events or stimuli.  They now are thinking differently about themselves as well as their children.

Finally, in this era of #MeToo, there is growing awareness that many of the parents of the children we work with bring their own trauma with them into parenting  Are You a Trauma Survivor AND the Parent of a Special Needs Child?.  I just did a presentation in FL (Feb2020) on using sensory processing treatment to help adults with traumatic dissociation.  The dysregulation that accompanies trauma doesn’t disappear after delivering a child.  At times, having a child can bring past traumas up to the surface and create problems that seems to have been handled or forgotten.  These parents need our support and assistance.

Which brings us to the question:  Should the parents of kids with sensory processing issues, especially the parents that have problems with self-regulation, use Quickshifts as well?

My strong opinion is that since there isn’t a downside, they should give the Regulation albums a try, and see how they navigate a typical day after listening.  The changes in adults are more subtle because their lives are more complex.  Parents need to know what changes to look for: usually the ability to remain calm with transitions, to focus on a task or to think a process through more easily.

Parents with more anxious tendencies might use Gentle Focus successfully, and parents that need to up-regulate would love Synching Up or Rockin’ Surf.  The decision to use Quickshifts and how to select albums really is easier when you consult an OT.  Wasting money and time buying and using the wrong album is unnecessary!  I love working with adults that have regulation issues or sensory sensitivities.  The relief in their faces tells me that they are getting the help they need to be their best.

 

mike-arney-9r-_2gzP37k-unsplash

Are You a Trauma Survivor AND the Parent of a Special Needs Child? This Can Help Make Life Easier

dawid-sobolewski-318745

First, let me say that trauma survivors can be among the most loving and active parents I work with as a pediatric occupational therapist.

How do I know they are survivors?  Some parents share their histories openly, and some aren’t aware of what their actions and words reveal.  Occupational therapists that have worked in psychiatry are particularly attuned to patterns of behavior that suggest a history of trauma.  And after therapy has gone on for a while and the therapeutic relationship blossoms, some parents wish to share more of their personal story with me.

Trauma survivors that had complicated pregnancies Can The Parents of Pediatric Clients Have PTSD? , have children with genetic disorders, or deliver children who develop developmental delays, come in all ages and social/support situations.  Some currently have a psychotherapist for support, and some have done a tremendous amount of therapy in the past.  Others may not even recognize that what they experienced in the past was traumatic, or that there is specialized help for trauma-related issues.

What they all have in common is the (mostly) sudden stressor of having a child with special needs, the seemingly endless daily demands of care, and the constant seeking/managing of medical, educational and therapy services.  Survivors of trauma may not realize that they aren’t alone with their feelings of distress, or that their child’s therapists can help them cope.

I wrote a post on how therapists can help a child’s siblings, How an Occupational Therapist Can Help The Siblings of Special Needs Children , but parents with trauma backgrounds can ask for and receive support from their child’s therapists as well:

The simplest way therapists can help you is to validate the real demands of care and give you some perspective on what other family’s lives are really like.  We are aware that we are asking parents to do home programs and obtain equipment and toys that facilitate development.  We also know that life is messy, and it is OK if you admit that you find it hard just getting through the day.  You can ask us if other parents go through the same things that you do, and you will find out that you might be doing more than we expect.

If you are having a rough period, ask us to give you just the ONE thing that would be the easiest to incorporate into your day that would help your child this week.  We won’t be offended.  You might be surprised to find that we know what those days/weeks/months feel like too.

Some parents who are trauma survivors are less likely to ask for a review or clarification of a technique or treatment when therapists give them instructions.  This can come from fearing criticism, having been taught not to question authorities, feeling judged by therapists they perceive as punitive authorities, and even being dissociative during their child’s therapy session.  “Spacing out”, forgetting, being confused, etc. are all possible dissociative responses.  Parents who are reliving a NICU nightmare or who are triggered and recall their own medical trauma or physical abuse may have a lot of difficulty learning to do treatments on their child that involve any level of restraint or distress.  This can be managed, but only if it is addressed.

Your child’s therapists have many different ways of holding and positioning a child, and different ways of administering a treatment technique.  You can express your discomfort in general terms or you can tell us that this is a trigger for you, and you can ask us to make things easier for you without having to tell your own story.  Asking for a few reviews of home programs is seen by most therapists as indicating interest in what we do.  We aren’t offended; we are flattered.

Some parents need to be out of the treatment room during a session for their own comfort, and that is also OK.  We like to share your child’s progress, and we welcome you into the session, but we understand if you need to have some distance.  Scheduling treatment at your child’s school or in a therapy center, rather than at home, may be easier for you.  Your child will still receive excellent treatment.

Trauma survivors can be extremely distressed when their child cries in therapy, or even while witnessing their child struggle to learn new skills.  This can bring up distressing childhood memories for them, some of which they may not fully recall or even connect with their responses to their child’s therapy session.

Therapists can be healing models for actively managing a child’s distress and expressing how they handle their own feelings when children struggle.  A parent that grew up in a punitive home may not have seen adults model healthy reactions to a child’s distress.

Therapists can teach you their techniques for grading challenge and providing support that reduces your child’s level of agitation.  My favorite book to learn how to respond to young children warmly but with limits is The Happiest Toddler on the Block by Dr. Harvey Karp.  His techniques support healthy attachment and children respond much more quickly than parents expect.  Everyone feels better, not just the kids!  Read Teaching Children Emotional Regulation: Can Happiest Toddler on the Block Help Kids AND Adults? for more on this amazing program and how it can help both of you.  Today.

Some of the OT treatments that help children also can help their parents with regulation issues and/or trauma histories.  Read Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?  and Stress Relief in the Time of Coronavirus: Enter Quickshifts about one easy treatment to develop a wider window of tolerance that works well for both children and adults.

UPDATE:  I was a speaker at the Healing Together conference in Orlando FL this month (Feb.2020). It was an amazing gathering for adults with dissociative disorders, their loved one/supporters and clinicians.  I highly recommend this conference to parents who are trauma survivors that struggle with dissociation.

rawpixel-653771-unsplash

 

Binaural Beats and Regulation: More Than Music Therapy

josh-wilburne-501952-unsplash

When you have so much to choose from, how do you pick the right one?

Binaural beat technology isn’t new.  But it is powerful.  This post is designed to answer some questions about how it works, why it works, and how I use it effectively in the treatment of sensory processing issues.

For people who have read about or tried Quickshifts  Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about listening on headphones versus speakers, and why the music has that echo-y tone.

The use of binaural headphones or speakers placed close to the child allows the ears to hear the full range of sound with as little interference or absorption from the environment.  It is important that the left and right ear are hearing the sounds separately.  The echo-y sound?  What you are hearing is the BBT; binaural beat technology.  The slight alteration in sound frequency between what the brain hears from the left and right speakers forces the brain to synch up at a frequency that matches this level of difference.

BBT isn’t new.  BBT has been used and researched since the 70’s.  It is out there in many forms; you can even find recorded BBT music on YouTube.  There are enough studies done to prove that this technology has real effects on alertness, attention and mood.  It makes sense that therapists would like to use it to help kids with self-regulation issues.  BBT is helpful for learning and self-regulation, but only if you know what brainwave state you want, and why you want it.  And that is where skilled therapists can help.

But which one to use?

 I only use Quickshifts in my therapy sessions.

 

Why do I prefer Quickshifts to deliver BBT?

  • Quickshifts entrain an alpha brainwave state.  This state is associated with calm focus the ability to move to a more powerful focus or downshift into sleep, and, wait for it, interoception.  Yup, the biggest new word in occupational therapy is interoception, and there are some excellent studies done by neuropsych researchers that indicate that alpha brainwave states increase interoception.  Yeah!  Interoception is the ability to perceive internal states, and this includes basic physiological states such as fatigue, hunger, and the need to eliminate.  So many of our clients struggle with knowing what they feel.  Quickshifts can help.
  • Alpha brainwave states are theorized to act as a gating mechanism for anxiety, which means they help kids block anxiety.  Anxiety isn’t a great state for kids with ASD, SPD, or any of us.  Anxiety is a component of so many diagnoses, and it isn’t easy to do cognitive behavioral strategies like CBT or DBT with children under 10 or 11.  Quickshifts also work well for adults with anxiety as well! Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?
  • The music used in Quickshifts is very carefully designed to enhance specific functional states, and every occupational therapist is all about functional performance.  We don’t want just relaxation; we want engagement in life.  The way that Quickshifts uses music allows BBT to address specific behavioral performance abilities.  There are albums for attention, for movement, and for regulation.  They all use BBT.  For each particular album, one functional goal will predominate.  I don’t need to induce a meditative state in a child that is working on handwriting.  I need calm focus and better movement control.
  • The avoidance of pure tones means I don’t have to worry about seizure activity in kids with a seizure disorder.  The use of pure tones is a risk for seizures, so if a child has frequent seizures, I can be confident that I am not increasing them if I use Quickshifts.
  • The choice of instrumentation on Quickshifts albums is often more grounding than other BBT choices.  I want kids to feel grounded, not floating on a cloud.  That state makes it harder to pay attention, to speak, move, etc.  Being jolted into a high level of engagement without grounding isn’t great either.  Remember:  OT is all about functioning.  This happens at that “just right” point of arousal.  I really like the way Quickshifts address anxiety and trauma.  Even if a child’s trauma reactions are based on their difficulties managing school with sensory processing or autonomic disorders, not abuse.  Not all trauma reactions are from profound abuse.  But when trauma IS the issue, Quickshifts have the edge over the Safe And Sound protocol.  Dr. Porges dropped the ball on understanding the HPA axis and how sound treatment can overwhelm a system that is biased for fear.  The key is the way the brainstem responds to sound novelty.  People with a high level of anxiety and fear will have an automatic aversion unless you deal with this problem first!
  • There is a progression of instrumentation and rhythm on many Quickshift albums that guides the brain into more environmental awareness and postural activation, but it is done gently.   Getting to an alpha state is a goal, but improving functional performance with less risk of overload is most important to me.  I have to give kids the ability to leave our session in a great state of mind.

Get the right headphones!  I just wrote Doing Therapeutic Listening? Get These Affordable, Comfortable, Kid-Size Bluetooth Headphones From PURO!  because the right headphones deliver the best results.  Don’t think you can use expensive headphones that cancel outside sounds; they destroy the binaural beats!

rawpixel-1054665-unsplash

He picked out his perfect pumpkin!

Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Regulation, Attention, and Postural Activation

kiana-bosman-572108-unsplash

Every child loves music, but not every music is therapy!

What if you could add a sensory-based treatment that targets specific sensory, motor, and behavioral goals, doesn’t require expensive equipment or a large therapy space, and you could see the effects within a very short time?

Since adding Quickshifts to my therapy sessions, I have been able to successfully address some of the more difficult behaviors and sensory processing issues I encounter.  Very young children are often afraid of being on therapy balls and swings, and they don’t always tolerate the Wilbarger or Astronaut protocols Why Is The Wilbarger Protocol So Hard To Get Right?.  But everyone can listen to music.  Enter Quickshifts.

I am primarily using them over speakers, since even older kids are struggling with wearing headphones.  I find that this isn’t preventing progress, and I periodically try to reintroduce headphones with children over 2.  They change so quickly that I never know when “NO” will turn into “maybe”.

Every Quickshift album uses brainwave entrainment.  The use of binaural beat technology (BBT) for entrainment of an alpha brainwave state has made a difference with the kids who display predominantly anxious or dysregulated states, but it is also very helpful to entrain better attention and postural activation.  Read more about the science behind BBT in Binaural Beats and Regulation; More Than Music Therapy.  It is great for parents too: Stress Relief in the Time of Coronavirus: Enter Quickshifts.

Quickshift albums are intended to rapidly bring the brain into this alpha state, with a focus on reducing anxiety and building affective modulation.  Yes; this form of therapeutic listening has the ability to decrease, not increase, anxiety.  But there are a wide range of albums.  Some emphasize postural activation, some work on sensory modulation and sensitivity, and some improve attentional focus or social interaction.  Why would music affect posture or anxiety?  Because these albums use specific rhythms and melodies, as well as binaural beat technology.  OTs know a lot about how sound affects brain function, and this isn’t about “liking” the music, although kids do.  It is about creating differences in the brain.

I am particularly fond of the regulation albums and the social interaction albums, as my clients inevitably struggle with these issues.  I can see a shift (not a pun:  the shift is real) about 5-7 minutes into the 14-17 minute albums.  This is helpful in a session.  If I only have 30-45 minutes, I cannot do 15 minutes of sensory input to achieve regulation.  I need more time for treatment goals.  This gives me precious minutes, and helps kids see that regulation is possible.

Why Modulated Music Wasn’t Working For Me

I stopped using Modulated music a long time ago.  I rarely use it with children under 5 now.  Not because I don’t think it was an effective treatment.  Because I couldn’t get any compliance at home, and I saw very little progress with use only in my therapy sessions.  There was often a learning phase, in which I had to adjust the amount of listening time to prevent overwhelming young or very challenged children.  Parents start to question my clinical skills and I risk losing their confidence.  Families were resistant; even the families that really wanted to use this music.

The way Modulated music needed to be scheduled and used (two daily 30-minute sessions, 2-3 hour wait before sleep times and between listening times) made it almost impossible to use with very young children at home, regardless of how willing parents seemed to be.  And very few parents were that willing.  Maybe they would be able to do insulin injections on a schedule, but not therapeutic music. Everyone is so over-scheduled and busy.   I hated begging, so I had to find something easier that also worked well.

Quickshifts:  More Flexible, More Easily Tolerated, More Effective in EI

Quickshifts have been much more flexible, but just as successful.  Maybe more!  They can be used often throughout the day, any time of the day.  I haven’t seen one small child react in a way that indicated that they were overwhelmed.  The ability to target specific types of sensory-based goals means I can deliver results the parents can see.  the emphasis on alpha brainwave states seems to deliver an extra layer of calmness.

Gearshifters are similar to Qucikshifts, but they do not have the targeted immediacy that I find so helpful.  When are Gearshifters better to use?  When I need a longer-lasting modulation effect and I don’t have concerns about spatial awareness or need to reduce agitation.  Some kids need a Quickshift album followed by a Gearshifter to have a few hours of really good sensory modulation time.

Use the best headphones!  Read  Doing Therapeutic Listening? Get These Affordable, Comfortable, Kid-Size Bluetooth Headphones From PURO!  to learn what equipment is going to make this work for you.

Parents are happy to be able to download the albums onto their phones and use them to improve transitions, sleep, attention and more. The use of technology to entrain an alpha brainwave state means that if the album isn’t a perfect fit, I don’t get an overwhelmed child; there is always some degree of improvement in regulation and arousal.  But when I have seen kids generate more postural activation, calm down and even laugh, or tune into their environments in ways they never have before Quickshifts, I wonder why I waited so long to get this treatment on board.  It isn’t just for sensory sensitivity or modulation problems; read more about how it can help kids with motor control issues here: Therapeutic Listening Can Enhance Motor Skills….Really!

Wondering if adults can use Quickshifts too?  Read  Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts? for more about how this music can help everybody in the family.

If you are tempted to go out and buy these albums without the guidance of an OTR that is trained in sound therapy, please reconsider.  The reason that I have had such success with Quickshifts is not just because this treatment works.  It works because I use it as part of a whole sensory-based protocol, in which I can select and prescribe the right music to be used at the right time.  There really is a reason to have an OTR help you.  You will get better results, avoid problems, save time and money, and have someone trained in treatment guiding you.  Not Dr. Google.  I do phone consultations to help people decide on a sensory processing treatment plan that saves them time and money.  Visit my website tranquil babies to book a session!

conner-baker-480775

Are YOU A Sensory Sensitive Parent?

If you fill out the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile for your child and see yourself on the page too, don’t be too surprised. Actually, you might feel relieved, and even a bit excited. Because now you know that you aren’t “crazy” or “weird” or even “difficult”. If you have some sensory processing issues of your own, you can learn how to address them and improve your situation while you are helping your child learn to build her own sensory processing skills.

About one in four of the families I work with will admit that at least one parent has or had difficulties with sensory processing at one time. They rarely offer this information at the evaluation. Only with the reframing that occurs as I explain the process of therapy for sensory processing disorder for their child do I hear about how they or their partner only eats certain textures of food or cannot tolerate wearing clothes with long sleeves.

Now, that revelation is just the beginning of a conversation about themselves, because one or two issues with sensory experiences doesn’t indicate a sensory processing problem. Eventually I will hear about all the small and sundry things that this person avoids or alters in order to manage life as a functioning adult. Then it becomes clear to both of us: the story they told themselves about their preferences or personality quirks is likely to be based in sensory processing struggles, not psychology.

Older children and adults who have never had treatment are told (or tell themselves) that they are difficult, rigid, controlling, and too sensitive. This sounds very demeaning, but in fact it is often not intended to be hurtful. Behavior is often seen as only occurring for cognitive or emotional reasons. You have a feeling, and the reason is how you are thinking or feeling.  But behavior is now understood to have many drivers, and it isn’t always cognitive or emotional.

The truth is that sensory processing creates the impetus for many of our behaviors in childhood and beyond. Not seeing the effect of the body on behavior is a huge impediment to addressing issues effectively.  Yes, people who are overwhelmed with sensory input can and do try to control their environment and the people in it. It looks like they are rigid and difficult. But it is not the same as being manipulative and aggressive due to interpersonal or emotional events.

Avoiding touch or movement can also appear to be relational when it is a sensory-based issue. The relational problems begin when the person or other people interpret the behavior as indicating something else, such as shyness or social aversion. How you define yourself and how others define you is like choosing which road to travel. It means that you may not see all the reasons for behavior and all the possibilities for change.

People who have experienced trauma in childhood OR adulthood appear to be more likely to exhibit sensory processing issues.  There are some researchers that are very interested in sensory processing and trauma, such as Ulrich Lanius, but the treatment tends to be psychodynamic or EMDR, not the types of treatments that OTs use.  That is a shame, because we have a lot of helpful, effective, and affordable treatment strategies that work WITH psychotherapy, not against it.

Adults rarely receive effective treatment for long-standing sensory processing issues. Sometimes they have come up with their own solutions, such as doing yoga to receive deep pressure input. They may tell their friends that they can’t digest certain foods, when in fact just seeing some foods makes them nauseous. I am more than happy to work with parents and help them creatively explore solutions for themselves when it is indicated. I have even treated adults formally as an OT from time to time. When parents see themselves more clearly as they support their child, both parties can address sensory processing issues more effectively.