Tag Archives: trauma

Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?

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My clients and my blog readers know that I started using a therapeutic sound treatment called Quckshifts earlier this year Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Regulation, Attention, and Postural Activation.  I haven’t lost my enthusiasm for this treatment.  It has made easy sessions more effective, and difficult sessions workable.  Kids that are struggling get a boost, and kids that needed a lot of preparatory sensory activity to regulate and engage rapidly find their footing.

Could this be useful for parents too?

There is no age limit on the use of Quickshifts, and the creators at Vital Links write and speak about treating adults using this program in their training materials.  But thus far I haven’t heard them talk about the use of Quickshifts with the parents of their clients.  I wonder why.

If you have a child with sensory issues, even one who attends mainstreamed programs and is doing fairly well in social activities, your days have a certain level of stress in them.  Sensory diets work, but they also take work to use and monitor.  Children aren’t crockpots, so you are actively administering or at least setting up the activities the comprise a sensory diet.  Kids reach bumps in the road, and kids with sensory issues can have bigger meltdowns over smaller bumps.  Parents have to help them manage things that other kids shrug off.  And parents always are thinking ahead, wondering what effect a new summer camp or new school with have on their child.  Even when things are going well, parents can feel some stress about all of these things.

It is well known that if you are a therapist treating children with sensory processing issues, at least one parent could say to you “Wow; I used to have the same problems, and everyone told me I was just being difficult/stubborn/picky, etc.”  Treatment options picked up in the early 90s, so we do hear this less and less.  But not in every community  or school system.  And if a parent’s parents refused to “believe” in sensory treatment, then these kids got nothing.  Or perhaps they were sent to a psychologist.  When I describe their child’s experiences using sensory processing terms, some parents recognize that their responses are very similar.  They have been told, or they have assumed, that they are reacting psychologically to events or stimuli.  They now are thinking differently about themselves as well as their children.

Finally, in this era of #MeToo, there is growing awareness that many of the parents of the children we work with bring their own trauma with them into parenting  Are You a Trauma Survivor AND the Parent of a Special Needs Child?.  I just did a presentation in FL (Feb2020) on using sensory processing treatment to help adults with traumatic dissociation.  The dysregulation that accompanies trauma doesn’t disappear after delivering a child.  At times, having a child can bring past traumas up to the surface and create problems that seems to have been handled or forgotten.  These parents need our support and assistance.

Which brings us to the question:  Should the parents of kids with sensory processing issues, especially the parents that have problems with self-regulation, use Quickshifts as well?

My strong opinion is that since there isn’t a downside, they should give the Regulation albums a try, and see how they navigate a typical day after listening.  The changes in adults are more subtle because their lives are more complex.  Parents need to know what changes to look for: usually the ability to remain calm with transitions, to focus on a task or to think a process through more easily.

Parents with more anxious tendencies might use Gentle Focus successfully, and parents that need to up-regulate would love Synching Up or Rockin’ Surf.  The decision to use Quickshifts and how to select albums really is easier when you consult an OT.  Wasting money and time buying and using the wrong album is unnecessary!  I love working with adults that have regulation issues or sensory sensitivities.  The relief in their faces tells me that they are getting the help they need to be their best.

 

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Are You a Trauma Survivor AND the Parent of a Special Needs Child?

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First, let me say that trauma survivors can be among the most loving and active parents I work with as a pediatric occupational therapist.

How do I know they are survivors?  Some parents share their histories openly, and some aren’t aware of what their actions and words reveal.  Occupational therapists that have worked in psychiatry are particularly attuned to patterns of behavior that suggest a history of trauma.  And after therapy has gone on for a while and the therapeutic relationship blossoms, some parents wish to share more of their personal story with me.

Trauma survivors that had complicated pregnancies Can The Parents of Pediatric Clients Have PTSD? , have children with genetic disorders, or deliver children who develop developmental delays, come in all ages and social/support situations.  Some currently have a psychotherapist for support, and some have done a tremendous amount of therapy in the past.  Others may not even recognize that what they experienced in the past was traumatic, or that there is specialized help for trauma-related issues.

What they all have in common is the (mostly) sudden stressor of having a child with special needs, the seemingly endless daily demands of care, and the constant seeking/managing of medical, educational and therapy services.  Survivors of trauma may not realize that they aren’t alone with their feelings of distress, or that their child’s therapists can help them cope.

I wrote a post on how therapists can help a child’s siblings, How an Occupational Therapist Can Help The Siblings of Special Needs Children , but parents with trauma backgrounds can ask for and receive support from their child’s therapists as well:

The simplest way therapists can help you is to validate the real demands of care and give you some perspective on what other family’s lives are really like.  We are aware that we are asking parents to do home programs and obtain equipment and toys that facilitate development.  We also know that life is messy, and it is OK if you admit that you find it hard just getting through the day.  You can ask us if other parents go through the same things that you do, and you will find out that you might be doing more than we expect.

If you are having a rough period, ask us to give you just the ONE thing that would be the easiest to incorporate into your day that would help your child this week.  We won’t be offended.  You might be surprised to find that we know what those days/weeks/months feel like too.

Some parents who are trauma survivors are less likely to ask for a review or clarification of a technique or treatment when therapists give them instructions.  This can come from fearing criticism, having been taught not to question authorities, feeling judged by therapists they perceive as punitive authorities, and even being dissociative during their child’s therapy session.  “Spacing out”, forgetting, being confused, etc. are all possible dissociative responses.  Parents who are reliving a NICU nightmare or who are triggered and recall their own medical trauma or physical abuse may have a lot of difficulty learning to do treatments on their child that involve any level of restraint or distress.  This can be managed, but only if it is addressed.

Your child’s therapists have many different ways of holding and positioning a child, and different ways of administering a treatment technique.  You can express your discomfort in general terms or you can tell us that this is a trigger for you, and you can ask us to make things easier for you without having to tell your own story.  Asking for a few reviews of home programs is seen by most therapists as indicating interest in what we do.  We aren’t offended; we are flattered.

Some parents need to be out of the treatment room during a session for their own comfort, and that is also OK.  We like to share your child’s progress, and we welcome you into the session, but we understand if you need to have some distance.  Scheduling treatment at your child’s school or in a therapy center, rather than at home, may be easier for you.  Your child will still receive excellent treatment.

Trauma survivors can be extremely distressed when their child cries in therapy, or even while witnessing their child struggle to learn new skills.  This can bring up distressing childhood memories for them, some of which they may not fully recall or even connect with their responses to their child’s therapy session.

Therapists can be healing models for actively managing a child’s distress and expressing how they handle their own feelings when children struggle.  A parent that grew up in a punitive home may not have seen adults model healthy reactions to a child’s distress.

Therapists can teach you their techniques for grading challenge and providing support that reduces your child’s level of agitation.  My favorite book to learn how to respond to young children warmly but with limits is The Happiest Toddler on the Block by Dr. Harvey Karp.  His techniques support healthy attachment and children respond much more quickly than parents expect.  Everyone feels better, not just the kids!  Read Teaching Children Emotional Regulation: Can Happiest Toddler on the Block Help Kids AND Adults? for more on this amazing program and how it can help both of you.  Today.

Some of the OT treatments that help children also can help their parents with regulation issues and/or trauma histories.  Read Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts? about one easy treatment to develop a wider window of tolerance that works well for both children and adults.

UPDATE:  I was a speaker at the Healing Together conference in Orlando FL this month (Feb.2020). It was an amazing gathering for adults with dissociative disorders, their loved one/supporters and clinicians.  I highly recommend this conference to parents who are trauma survivors that struggle with dissociation.

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Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Regulation, Attention, and Postural Activation

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Every child loves music, but not every music is therapy!

What if you could add a sensory-based treatment that could target specific sensory and behavioral goals, doesn’t require expensive equipment or a large therapy space, and you could see the effects within a very short time?

Since adding Quickshifts to my therapy sessions, I have been able to address some of the more difficult behaviors and sensory processing issues I encounter in EI.  Very young children are often afraid of being on therapy balls and swings, and they don’t always tolerate the Wilbarger or Astronaut protocols Why Is The Wilbarger Protocol So Hard To Get Right?.  But everyone can listen to music.  Enter Quickshifts.

I am primarily using them over speakers, since even older kids are struggling with wearing headphones.  I find that this isn’t preventing progress, and I periodically try to reintroduce headphones with children over 2.  They can change so quickly that I never know when “NO” will turn into “maybe”.

Every Quickshift album uses brainwave entrainment.  The use of binaural beat technology (BBT) for entrainment of an alpha brainwave state has really made a difference with the kids who display predominantly anxious or dysregulated states.  Read more about BBT in Binaural Beats and Regulation; More Than Music Therapy.

Why Modulated Music Wasn’t Working For Me

I stopped using Modulated music a long time ago.  Not because I didn’t think it was an effective treatment.  Because I couldn’t get any compliance at home, and I saw very little progress with use only in my therapy sessions.  There was often a learning phase, in which I had to adjust the amount of listening time to prevent overwhelming young or very challenged children.  Using them only in treatment sessions seemed to make little meaningful difference in my little customers.  Families were resistant; even the families that really wanted to use this music.  The way Modulated music needed to be scheduled and used (two daily 30-minute sessions, 2-3 hour wait before sleep times and between listening times) made it almost impossible to use with very young children at home, regardless of how willing parents seemed to be.  And very few parents were that willing.  Maybe they would be able to do insulin injections on a schedule, but not therapeutic music.  I hated begging, so I had to find something easier that worked well.

Quickshifts:  More Flexible, More Easily Tolerated, More Effective in EI

Quickshifts have been much more flexible, but just as successful.  Maybe more!  They can be used often throughout the day, any time of the day.  I haven’t seen one small child react in a way that indicated that they were overwhelmed.  The ability to target specific types of sensory-based goals means I can deliver results the parents can see.  the emphasis on alpha brainwave states seems to deliver an extra layer of calmness.

Parents are happy to be able to download the albums onto their phones and use them to improve transitions, sleep, attention and more. The use of technology to entrain an alpha brainwave state means that if the album isn’t a perfect fit, I don’t get an overwhelmed child; there is always some degree of improvement in regulation and arousal.  But when I have seen kids generate more postural activation, calm down and even laugh, or tune into their environments in ways they never have before Quickshifts, I wonder why I waited so long to get this treatment on board.

Wondering if adults can use Quickshifts too?  Read  Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts? for more about how this music can help everybody in the family.

If you are tempted to go out and buy these albums without the guidance of an OTR that is trained in sound therapy, please reconsider.  The reason that I have had such success with Quickshifts is not just because this treatment works.  It is because I use it as part of a whole sensory-based protocol, in which I can select and prescribe the right music to be used at the right time.  There really is a reason to have an OTR help you.  You will get better results, avoid problems, save time and money, and have someone trained in treatment guiding you.  Not Dr. Google.  I do phone consultations to help people decide on a sensory processing treatment plan that saves them time and money.  Visit my website tranquil babies to book a session!

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