Tag Archives: toilet training

The Difference Between Special Needs and Typical Potty Training Approaches: Address Sensory/Behavioral Issues and Use Consistent Routines

tai-jyun-chang-270109.jpgAfter writing The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I have been asked what was different about my book. There must be 100 books on potty training special needs kids. What did I do differently? Simple. I am an occupational therapist, so I have no choice but to use my 360 degree viewpoint to target all the skills needed to do the job. Seeing the path to independence in this way was second nature to me, but not to parents of kids with special needs. Time to offer some support!

The books I reviewed before I started writing were great, but every one lacked at least one important feature. If the authors were psychologists and teachers, they weren’t fully comprehending or directly addressing the sensory and motor aspects of a very physical skill. Oops.

OTs are always aware of the cognitive and social/behavioral components of activities of daily living, but we also have a solid background in physiology and neurology as well. That makes us your go-to folks for skills like toilet training. And that is a major reason why The Practical Guide is so helpful to the frustrated parents of children with SPD,autism, Down Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, and a host of other diagnoses that result in delays or difficulties with muscle tone and potty training independence. It explains in detail how low tone creates sensory, motor, and social/behavioral problems, and how to address them. Knowledge is power, and knowledge leads to independence.

The other huge difference is that developing consistent sensory-motor-behavioral routines matter more for these kids. Tone isn’t a constant, as anyone with a child that has low tone knows all too well. Fatigue, illness, even a very warm day; these all make kids less stable and can even reduce their safety. Having a really solid routine makes movements easier to execute and more controlled when situations aren’t perfect. Kids with normal muscle tone can shift their behavior on the fly. They can quickly adjust and adapt movement in ways that children with low tone simply cannot. It isn’t a matter of being stubborn or lazy. Kids with low tone aren’t going to get the sensory feedback fast enough to adjust their motor output.

Good motor planning on a “bad day” occurs for these kids when they have well-practiced routines that support safe and smoothly executed movements. What makes the difference isn’t intelligence or attention. It is recalling a super-safe routine effortlessly. This is completely attainable for kids who have speech or cognitive issues as well as issue with low tone and instability. It may take them longer to learn the routine, but it pays them back with fewer accidents and fewer tears.

To learn more about my book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, visit my website, tranquil babies.com, or view it on Amazon.com!ferris-wheeltai-jyun-chang-270109

Why is Staying Dry at Night So Challenging For Some Children?

I have received a few questions on this subject since publishing my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  Parents are wondering how to expand daytime success through the night.  Here is what I know about getting through the night high and dry:  it is as much a physical milestone as a behavioral accomplishment.  The pituitary gland is involved in hormonal secretions to diminish urine production, and the nerves for sphincter control may not be fully developed in younger children.  The bladder has to expand to hold a quantity of urine at night, so tiny children really cannot accomplish this feat, regardless of motivation.

Typical children who are dry all day can need another 2-4 years (yes, years!) to stay dry at night and/or wake themselves and use the potty independently.  The child who is a “potty master”, getting there on time and managing all the skills at school, may still need a pull-up style training pant as an insurance policy.

What can you do to improve the odds of dryness at night?

  • Limit drinks right before bed.  As you know from my book, children will generate enough urine to “go” about 45 minutes after a big drink.  The kidneys are also responding to hormone and salt levels in the blood, so some urine will be generated at night, even if nothing has been taken in by mouth for 2 hours before bed.  Deny that late night sippy cup or that last swig of juice, and come up with a better bedtime routine in it’s place.
  • Insist on the bathroom being a last stop before bedtime.  Empty that bladder, even if your child insists that they don’t feel that they need to “go”.
  • Make sure your child is well hydrated during the day.  A thirsty child is going to beg for that drink, and then fail to stay dry.  The bladder gets it’s exercise during the day, as it fills and empties.  Constantly running to the bathroom, or never making it to the bathroom can both contribute to late preschool bedwetting.  Be encouraging but firm with children that tend to dry out during the day.  They don’t realize the part their refusal plays in bedwetting, they just feel like a failure, and maybe worry that they are a failure in your eyes as well.
  • Recognize the role of constipation can play in bedwetting.  The pressure of stool on a bladder can be enough to create problems.  My book has many ideas to address constipation, and this is another reason to address this problem instead of hoping it will go away.
  • Accept that brain maturation is a key driver of night dryness.  A child with brain differences, from ASD to ADHD to SPD, may need more time to achieve this milestone.  Criticism and harshness isn’t going to make that brain develop any faster.
  • Ask your pediatrician’s advice if your typical child isn’t dry at night by 7, or if you suspect that there is another issue.  Never ignore your gut feelings about your child.  You know more than you think!

Take a look at The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! to learn more about my e-book and how it can help you toilet train your child!  Visit my website tranquil babies to purchase the book and buy a phone consultation to get your specific questions answered personally!

Can You Toilet Train a Non-Verbal Child?

Parents of non-verbal children often delay toilet training, assuming that these kids need more communication skills to be successful.  I disagree.  I think children and their parents need other skills more.  Here are my thoughts about what really matters for these kids:

  • Their parents need excellent observation skills.  A child that cannot easily communicate their needs and concerns is still showing you signs that they have already eliminated or that they are ready to eliminate.  Children have familiar facial and postural changes such as grimacing, grunting, and crouching.  They often go to their “poopy place”, a location in the house where they prefer to have bowel movements. Behind the sofa is a common spot.  Just like typically-developing kids, parents who know when to anticipate elimination can guide their child to the potty so that kids make the connection between sitting and successfully eliminating.  This may mean that grazing and sipping all day long is over.  If drinks and meals are served generously but not continuously, it is easier to predict when a child will have a full bladder.  The act of eating often stimulates colon activity, so bowel moments are more regular and therefore predictable as well.  This is easier when meals are larger and eating is not happening in small snacks through the day.
  • Children need familiar routines.  When non-verbal children can anticipate a toileting routine, they don’t need to rely as much on receptive or expressive language skills.   For example, ending a meal and getting dressed will remind them that they now go to the toilet.  Lack of a routine will mean that they have to work harder on communication.  Being caught out of their routine and in need of a toilet could be so stressful that they resist giving up their diaper.  Create and carefully maintain  routines that support success and calmness around elimination.
  • Families need good toileting equipment.  A child that cannot describe in detail why they are uncomfortable is going to be less cooperative with toileting.  Beyond an appropriate potty or toilet insert/footstool set-up, a non-verbal child needs clothing that is easy to manage and wet wipes that really clean them.  My strategy of “dry runs”, in which children pretend and get a chance to practice, helps everyone see if they have prepared well for toilet training.

Help has arrived!  My book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, is now available on my website, tranquil babies and in a clothbound hard copy by contacting me through my site.  Read   The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Help Has Arrived!  to learn how my innovative book is designed to be parent-friendly and help you move forward with toilet training today!

Low Tone and Constipation: Why This Issue Delays Toilet Training Progress

Kids with low tone and sensory processing disorders are not the only children who struggle with constipation, but it is more common for them.  The reasons are many:  low abdominal and oral tone, less use of available musculature because they use compensatory sitting and standing (the schlump, the lean, the swayback) patterns, and even food choices that have less fiber.  If you struggle to chew and swallow, you probably aren’t drinking enough and eating those fruits and veggies that have fiber.  Sucking applesauce packets may get you Vitamin C, but it has pulverized all that fiber.  Now add discomfort with the sensory experience: the smells, feelings, sounds of bathrooms and using the potty.  It can all be too much!

Without fluids, fiber and intra-abdominal pressure to support peristalsis (the automatic contraction of the intestines), children with low tone are at a huge risk for constipation.  And constipation makes pooping harder and even painful.  Sensory overload makes kids agitated, distracted, and sometimes even aggressive.  Not good for learning or letting it go into the toilet.  Hence, resistance and even fear of pooping, and therefore more stress and withholding of stool.  A really big problem, one that you may have to get your pediatrician’s assistance to solve.

It can change.  Here is your secret weapon: your child’s occupational therapist.  If you haven’t been involved in your child’s therapy before, this might be the time.  Research has shown that sensory-based issues can contribute to toileting problems, and OTs are capable of evaluating all the sensory and motor-based contributors.  While  your pediatrician gives you recommendations on diet, laxatives and more, your OT can help your child stay in the alert-but-calm zone where digestion is relaxed, get better core stability to help push that poop along, and adapt the toileting experience for minimal sensory aversion and maximal sensory perception.  Take a look at Low Tone and Toilet Training: How Your Child’s Therapists Can Help You and Low Tone and Toilet Training: The Importance of Dry Runs (Pun Totally Intended).

Update:  Many of my clients have been successful with a creative combo approach:  they use stool softeners, they limit refined carbs (sorry, Goldfish crackers are cheese plus refined carbs!), ensure lots of fluids and then add some tasty fiber.  Prunes covered with chocolate have been popular, but beware the results of too much of a good thing!  They use abdominal massage and make sure that their physical and occupational therapists are working those core stabilizers.

There are medications that improve gastric motility, but they aren’t always tolerated or even prescribed for small children.  Pediatricians are very hesitant to be aggressive with a small child that could dehydrate in a few hours of diarrhea.  Find a doctor that listens to you and is creative.  My suggestion?  Think outside the box and consider an osteopath.  They are “real” doctors, but they have more training in alternative and manual treatment approaches.

Good news!

My book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, is done and available at  Your Therapy Source ( a terrific site for parents and therapists!) as well as on my website, tranquil babies !!  Just click on the “e-book” section, and start making progress with your child today!

I include detailed readiness checklists and a full explanation of how to train your child in all aspects of toilet training.  You will know how to get the right equipment, what clothes to use so that dressing doesn’t derail your child’s best efforts, and how to deal with defiance and distress.  And yes, constipation is addressed in more detail than in this blog post.  It may turn out to be only one of the issues that you have to confront.  Don’t worry, help has arrived!

If you want a hard copy, contact me through my site and request a mailing address for your payment.

            As I say in my book:  be prepared, be consistent, expect to practice, and be positive that you and your child can do this!

 

 

 

 

Low Tone and Toilet Training: How Your Child’s Therapists Can Help You

Over the years as an occupational therapist, I have been giving parents hints here and there.  Writing my e-book  this fall, and preparing an e-course (coming soon) to support families makes me realize that some clients did not ask me very many questions while they were toilet training their child.

So….Are there aspects of therapy that can help you with toilet training?  Yes indeed!  Does getting more therapy mean that your child will automatically be trained earlier and more easily?  Unfortunately, not really.

When it comes to potty training, you can bring a child to the potty, but you can’t make him “make”.  Toilet training is a complex skill, and even the best therapy will still only prepare all of you and develop important skills needed for this skill.  Bringing it all together is still the job of the parent or the full-time caregiver that creates and executes the plan. Waiting for readiness?  Read Waiting for Toilet Training Readiness? Create It Instead!  to understand what you can do today to inspire interest and build skills. Thinking that it’s too soon?   How Early Can You Start Toilet Training?  will shad some light on what is really important when you are wondering if your child is old enough.  If you are wondering if your child’s diagnosis is part of the issue, take a look at Why Do Some Kids With ASD and SPD Refuse Toilet Training?  And finally, if you are eager to move into night-time training, read Why is Staying Dry at Night So Challenging For Some Children? for support at the finish line of toilet training.

Here is a list of what therapy can do to support you and your child for toilet training.  If you haven’t heard your therapists discussing these treatment goals/approaches, you might want to share this post with them.  They may be more focused on other very important skills right now, but always keep your discussions open and inform them that you are planning on training.  Most therapists are very eager to support families whenever they can with whatever goals the family has.

  1. Core stability for balance, abdominal strength and safety on the toilet.  Most kids with low tone do not have great core stability, and this is where the rubber meets the road.  A weak core will put a child at greater risk of falling or feeling like he will fall.  It is harder to relax and pee/poop if you are afraid you will land on the floor.
  2. Clothing management and hand washing.  No child is really independent in using the toilet if someone else has to pull clothing up and down.  Washing hands is a hygiene essential.  Time to learn.
  3.   Good abdominal tone.  See #1.  Helps with intestinal motility as well.  That is the contraction of smooth muscle that moves the poop through the colon and on out.  My favorite hack is the use of kineseotape in the classic abdominal facilitation pattern.  All but one of my clients have had a nice big bowel movement the next day after taping; no pain, no fuss.  Regular taping along with strengthening can improve proprioceptive awareness internally (interoception, for those of you who need a new word for the week!)
  4. Transfers and equipment assessment/recommendations.  Therapists can teach your child how to get on/off, up and down safely from a toilet or potty seat.  They can teach you what to say and do to practice transfers and how to guard them while they practice.  They can also take a look at what you already own and what you might need to obtain.  Children with significant motor issues may need an adaptive toileting seat, but most mildly to moderately low-toned kids do not need that level of support.  What they do need is safe and correctly-sized equipment.
  5. Proprioceptive awareness for balance and stability.  Some therapists use balance discs or boards, some use other equipment.  Swings, climbing, jumping, etc.  More body awareness= more independence.
  6. Sensory tolerance for the feeling of clothing, using wipes/TP, the smells and the small enclosure of a bathroom.  If your child has sensory sensitivity issues in daily life, you have to know that they are going to be issues with toilet training.
  7. Effective vestibular processing.  Children that have to turn around, bend and look down then behind their bodies to get TP or pull up their pants need efficient vestibular systems.  Vestibular processing isn’t just for walking and sitting at a table for school.
  8. Practicing working as a team and following directions.  Your child needs to be responsive to either your praise, your rewards or both.  Therapists that support independence (all of us!) and develop in your child the sense that the she is a part of the therapy plan will make it easier for your child to work with you on toileting!

 

 My e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is now available at Amazon.com as well as Your Therapy Source ( a terrific site for parents and therapists)  and on my website,  tranquil babies .  Families are telling me that they have made progress in potty training right away after reading my book!

Read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Help Has Arrived!  to learn how my book will help you and your child move forward today!

 

 

Low Tone and Toilet Training: What You Can Learn From Elimination Communication Theory

Yes, those folks who hold a 6 month-old over the toilet and let her defecate directly into the potty, not into a Pamper.  Elimination Communication (EC) has committed fans, as well as people who think it is both useless and even punishing to kids.  I am not taking sides here, but there is one thing that should get even the skeptics thinking:  a large portion of the developing world deals with babies and elimination this way.  It is very hard to buy a disposable diaper in Nepal, and it is a problem finding water to wash cloth diapers in the Sahara.  I know there are a bunch of parents who roll their eyes whenever EC comes up, but some aspects of the process could help you train your child to use the toilet.  Why not consider what you could learn from EC that will help your child?

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First, parents who practice EC become very very good at anticipating when their kids are going to need the toilet.  Signs such as grunting, flexing the trunk forward, even facial expressions are quickly noted.  If you spend a lot of time watching your child then you probably know some of the signs.  This makes it easier to tell them to sit on the potty when their attempts will actually be successful.  You can also help them connect the physical feelings they are reacting to with language.  Telling them that when they get that feeling in their belly, they need to go use the toilet sounds so obvious to us.  But if you are little, you need help connecting the dots.  If you are little and have learning issues, you need to hear it more often and stated clearly.

Secondly, EC counts on knowing that reflexive intestinal movement happens about 30 minutes after food enters the stomach, and kidneys dump urine into the bladder about 30-45 minutes after a big drink.  Unless your child has digestive issues, this is a good start to create your initial potty schedule plan.  Kids with constipation or slow stomach emptying may take longer, but you already know that you have to work on those issues as well to be successful in toilet training.  Remember, if your child is roaming the house with a sippy cup, it is going to be a lot harder to time a pee break so that they have a full bladder (remember the issue with poor proprioception of pressure in low tone?).  If not, check out  Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!)  Toilet training is a good time to limit drinking to larger amounts at meals and snacks.  This will work for preschool preparation as well.  Most programs would not allow your child to wander with a cup for hygiene reasons, and you are helping them get off the “sippy cup syndrome”, in which children trade bottle chewing for sippy cup slurping.

Think that embracing EC fully will fast-track your kid?  Not necessarily.  In fact, some EC kids struggle to become more separated from a parent as they are not cradled any longer while “making”.  Taking responsibility for their own hygiene and awareness can be harder for some very attached children than if they were using diapers and used them independently.  But EC concepts are something to think about carefully when you are making your plan to help your child with low muscle tone.

 

 

Low Tone and Toilet Training: Parents And Children Need To Work Together

This one is simple to explain, but not so easy to achieve with some kids.  Children whose interactional pattern is defiance or whining are going to be much harder to train, regardless of whether or not they have significant issues with low muscle tone.  In fact,  I would rather coach a very physically unstable but cooperative child than a toddler with mildly low tone but a firm commitment to resist any adult request.   If both parties aren’t able to work together, things may not go well.  At all.

Toddlers and preschoolers are known for their tendency to love the word “no”.  Did you know that, developmentally, the high-water mark for hysteria and the reflexive “no” is between 18 and 24 months?  Yup, that’s when language skills haven’t emerged to support expressing feelings and comprehending adult reasons. It is when emotional fuses are neurologically short, as in that forebrain is still sooo immature.   They really can’t handle their emotions at all on a brain level.  They have just left that sweet-baby phase where they want to please you more than anything, and they can’t be quite as easily distracted from bad behavior now.  This is a generalization, and there are some parents reading this that are thinking “We never got that lovely baby phase.  He went from crabby infant to bossy toddler!”  Well, I sympathize,  and I still invite you to read on.  All is not lost.  As language, emotional and reasoning skills slowly grow, a child who still falls apart easily and rages constantly isn’t always at the mercy of neurology as much as not having some basic coping skills.  It’s time to work on them before you jump into potty training.

Toddlerhood is long, all the way up to 5 years-old, and I won’t minimize the tantrums and agitation that can emerge.  This extended path to greater maturity is why I bought, devoured and constantly use The Happiest Toddler on the Block, Dr. Harvey Karp’s great book on building toddler coping skills. Half of the benefit is learning to both listen to and talk to toddlers in a way that calms things down.  I could not do my work as a pediatric occupational therapist with as much joy and enthusiasm as I have without these strategies.  Thanks, Dr. Karp!

For parents of children with language, communication or cognitive issues that result in developmental delays, your child may be 4 years-old but their other skills that are closer to 18 months old.  You can still toilet train.  Has your child been diagnosed on the autistic spectrum?  You can still train them.  Really.  The process may take longer and you may have to be both very creative and very consistent, but it can be done.  Job #1 is still the same: building a cooperative and warm relationship.

If your days are defined by defiance and whining, you need to learn all of the Happiest Toddler techniques that reduce frustration, including Patience Stretching and the Fast Food Rule.  Stretch Your Toddler’s Patience, Starting Today! You need to use “time-ins” for shared fun and warmth without a goal in mind.  You could try some of the more language-based techniques such as Give It In Fantasy and Gossiping.  And of course, you need to look at your approach to setting limits. All that love is great, but if your child knows that there are no consequences to breaking family rules or aggression,  your plan is in trouble.  Dr. Karp’s techniques aren’t intended to be a toilet training plan, but they set the stage for learning and independence.  Those are the ultimate goals of toilet training!

If you would like a more detailed or more personal level of support, visit my website tranquil babies  and purchase a consultation (in the NY metro area) or a phone/video consult!