Tag Archives: sensory sensitivity

Make Wiping Your Child’s Nose Easier With Boogie Wipes

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It is cold and flu season here in the states, and I have already seen my share of snot-caked little faces.  Little children get more colds than older kids and adults, and they can turn into an agitated mess when you say “Honey, I need to wipe your nose”.  These wipes are going to make your job as chief booger-wiper a lot easier!

When I first saw Boogie Wipes, I will confess that I thought it was another expensive product to separate first-world parents from their money.  After all, I grew up on dry tissues and I survived.

I was wrong.  These really work.

At first, I thought that the use of moisture was the key to their success.  Not so.  Parents told me that using a regular baby wipe didn’t “do the deal” the way a Boogie Wipe took care of the snot problem and made kids calm down about nose-wiping.  I had to find out what really made this product better.

  1. Boogie Wipes have a few important ingredients that separate them from the standard baby wipes.  The first ingredient is water.  The second ingredient is sodium chloride; good old salt.  Saline is a combo of these two ingredients, and saline softens the gluey crud that is dried-on snot.  It also thins the still-wet snot so you can wipe it away without pressing so hard on tender skin.  Yeah!
  2. The next four ingredients are aloe leaf juice, chamomile flower extract, vitamin E and glycerin.  All gentle and (to most children) non-irritating skin conditioners.  I am a huge fan of Puffs Plus tissues, but these wipes are gentler than my fave tissues.  Children’s skin is so much more delicate than ours, and the ingredients in snot are so irritating.  That is even before it becomes a dried-on coating.  Boogie Wipes leave a thin coating of skin conditioners after you wipe your child’s face.  This coating acts as a slight skin barrier for the next drip of snot.  Brilliant!

The remaining ingredients are preservatives that prevent your open container of Boogie Wipes from becoming a source of germs instead of a source of relief.  I am sure that there are children who react to these preservatives, but I haven’t yet met any families that report problems over the years that this product has been available in NY.

Unless you know your child will react to these specific preservatives, I recommend trying the unscented version first (they come in fresh and lavender scents too) and using them before your child gets a cold.  It is kinder to find out that they are sensitive to any ingredients before their skin is already irritated by all that snot from an illness.  Kids whose skin is going to react will likely do so when well, but their skin can recover from any irritation more quickly when their immune system is not also fighting a bad cold.

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The Boogie folks do sell a saline spray as well as wipes, and I am all for using saline spray to loosen up internal nose crud.  The problem with sprays isn’t that they don’t work.  They do, and they work well.

The problem is that children are naturally avoidant of us sticking things up their noses, and they are really bad at controlling the “sniff” in order to efficiently suck the spray up into their sinuses.  I teach children how to blow their noses and how to handle sprays.  It is part of my job as an OTR.  Not the best part, but nevertheless, a part of teaching ADLs.  I haven’t had much success teaching children under 3 to use nose sprays.  They just get more frightened and upset.  If you have an older child or a child that seems less afraid of nose examinations at the pediatrician, then go ahead and give sprays a try.  It can really loosen up a clogged nose.

Good luck trying Boogie Wipes, or try the generic versions that I am starting to see on store shelves.  Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so manufacturers are telling us that they also know that these products really work!

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Halloween Fun When Kids Don’t or Can’t Trick-Or-Treat

 

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Kids big and little are anticipating Halloween, but this holiday isn’t always enjoyable for children with ASD, SPD, anxiety or motor issues.  Putting on a costume can be difficult for some kids to tolerate and nearly impossible for kids that have mobility issues.  Kids with endurance and mobility issues struggle to walk up to a front door and ring the bell, but they don’t want to be carried “like a baby”.  Even seeing other children in costume or decorations in their own home can be difficult for children that are very sensitive.

What begins as a celebration and an adventure becomes a minefield.  And yet, your child may be invited to participate in many Halloween events.  You may want to have a party in your own home.  Your child may even beg to be involved in things you know they will end up hating, not realizing the challenges ahead.  Inclusion is a murky pond for some kids.

Perhaps it doesn’t have to be so difficult.  Here are a few ideas that could make this holiday less stressful and more inclusive:

  • Costumes can be anything you want them to be.  Purchased costumes can be adapted or altered for comfort and tolerance.  If you have a child with tactile sensitivity, choosing the fabric that is less irritating is worth a trip to a brick-and-mortar store, or ordering multiple sets online with easy returns.  Instead of an eye patch for a pirate, you can use makeup to create one.  Princess skirts and Batman pants can be shortened to prevent tripping.  They can be bought larger and altered to allow for braces and for sitting in a wheelchair.  Hats and headpieces are optional, and can also be switched out for more wearable choices.  They can be purchased separately or by combining two costumes.  A comfortable costume is fun; an awkward costume will cost you in time, pain and struggle much more than you can imagine.
  • Trick-or-treat is over-rated.  Choose people your child knows, a neighborhood that has flat, accessible front steps, or even an apartment building with an elevator.  The experience of trick-or-treat doesn’t have to be a marathon to be fun: in fact, “fun” is the opposite of dragging stressed children around from house to house.  Remember that children with sensory modulation issues will start out excited and happy and become overwhelmed quickly.  Monitoring and planning for this helps both of you have fun that doesn’t end badly.
  • Many children with sensitivities need to practice wearing their costume until it becomes familiar.  They may protest and initially refuse, but some practice can really help them.  Make the run-through more fun by pairing it with something like watching a halloween movie at home or putting up decorations.  The child that refuses to wear a costume can become the child who doesn’t want to take it off!
  • Choose your home decorations with your child’s tolerance in mind.  It isn’t always about whether they are scary or not, it can be the brightness, the amount of movement or the sounds that overwhelm children.  You won’t always know what will be too much, so prepare yourself and the rest of the family that you may have to substitute/remove/repurpose things that don’t work out.
  • Do fun events that your child can handle.  Bake cookies, including the buy-and-bake-off cookies that don’t require a lot of effort or time.  The end product can be given to friends and family proudly.  Decorate a Halloween cookie house.  Put up cling-on decorations in windows and storm doors that are easy to remove if they become an issue.  Watch a fun movie at home and invite friends to dress up and come over for the show.

Holidays for kids with special needs take more thought, but they don’t have to be less fun, just a bit different.  The important concept is to consider your child’s needs and aim for the essential feelings of the holiday:  fun, and sharing the fun with others!

How to Help Sensitive Kids Handle Greeting People (Including Their Own Parents!)

 

Many kids with ASD and SPD struggle with agitation and even tantrums when people enter their homes.  It can happen when their parent returns home from work, eager to scoop them up.  These kids become shy, run away, even hit!

Many, even most parents, believe that this is “bad behavior”, being defiant, or expressing anger at having people entering their space.  As an OT, I think about it differently.  Here is what I think is happening, and how to help your child handle this experience more effectively.

Sensitive children, which includes but isn’t limited to kids with sensory processing disorders, experience transitions as big charges of energy.  We all register a charge when events end or we switch locations, and when people come into our space, but those of us with less sensitivity do not charge up so high and we return to our baseline level of arousal very quickly.  So quickly that it isn’t even on our radar.  You would have to hook us up to a device like a lie-detector set to see the burst of neurological charge.

Not the sensitive person.  They are super-charged, and with little kids, it often is expressed as outsized and inappropriate aversion or agitation.  Thus, the scream, the withdrawal, the running away.  This response is often followed with agitation as the adult walks away and the child is now sad to lose the connection.  It can all seem a bit strange.

The long-term answer?  A good treatment plan that reduces overall, everyday arousal levels.  The short-term answer?  Here is my protocol that helps kids avoid getting so out-of-sorts with greetings, and builds social skills.  The nicest thing about this protocol is that it looks normal, not clinical, and it does indeed lower the brain’s level of arousal.  Keeping calm, but staying in the game socially, trains the brain to handle more interaction, not to flee.

  1. Greet the child from a distance.  This may be 5-15 feet.  Use a warm but not over the top tone.  Keep it short but friendly.  Don’t linger on eye contact.
  2. The child has been provided with an object to handoff to the greeting adult.  It doesn’t have to be meaningful, especially if the child is under 2.  Anything will do.  The idea is that it is a meaningful interaction that the child controls.  They release it to the adult.  You may have to repeat it with two objects.  The adult’s grateful response is also warm but not effusive.
  3. Now is the time to offer a hug or a kiss.  Sometimes it works, sometimes not.  With older kids that have language, I use “Handshake, hug or high-five?”.  I offer the child a choice of contact, and this alone can get them from feeling imposed upon to empowered.
  4. If the child is still protesting, the adult sits near the child, engaged in something that could be fun for the child.  A book, scribbling, something appealing.  No offer or invite; the position and the activity are the invitation.  The child may come over and begin to engage.  Connection accomplished!

Grandparents and others can think that this is coddling, or too much work.  After all, why doesn’t she greet me warmly like other children?  It is hard to parent a child with sensitivities, but your primary focus is on helping the child feel calm and comforted.  Explain that this is helpful and that the child really does love them.  He just needs a bit of help to express it.

We should be able to get out of the way emotionally for the sake of little people.  If a family member cannot wrap their head around the need to support instead of impose themselves on a clearly agitated child, then they need more help to understand sensitivity.

 

 

Parents of Formerly Picky Eaters Can Feel Like The (Food) War is Still Going On

What do parents of children who have had successful treatment for oral sensory sensitivity have in common with Vietnam veterans? Parts of them do not know that the war is over.

Raising a child that can become unglued over the texture or taste of a new food is like walking through a minefield. As a pediatric OT, I have seen many children make amazing progress. The toddler who once grimaced while watching his mom eat a piece of chicken now grabs it from her hand and stuffs it into his mouth. The baby who screamed when cereal fell onto her hands is now happily swishing it around the high chair tray.

It’s the parent that is still frozen in fear. PTSD is something that people assume only happens to victims of crimes or war. Wrong. The daily emotional rollercoaster of dealing with sensory issues in young children (and older ones too, to be honest) can leave parents with all the signs of PTSD. Anticipating problems, recalling the worst mealtime blowups even when things are going well now, feeling anxious even as your child munches down a snack happily. And reacting to any minor and non-sensory complains with an internal “Oh, here we go again, I knew it would come back!”

It makes sense to me. The stress seemed to never end because the meals kept on coming. You never know if it will be a horror or an easy meal. The level of reaction your child exhibits is not always the same, so you wonder what will happen. All the time. And you feel as if no one could possibly understand how this feels. You feel alone and on edge. The next meal could be the worst, so you have to be prepared for it.

If this description fits you, please don’t think that you are alone. You are not. Good therapy can help your child learn to manage their reactions to food and mealtime. It really can. But you may need some support too. Seek it out, and reject any professional that tells you to just relax. You would have relaxed if you could have. You have been through a lot, and sometimes getting some support helps.

Infants With Sensory Sensitivity: When Your Fussy Baby Takes Over Your Life

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Parents are often the first to suspect that their infant’s constant and intense complaints are more than just fussiness.  Sometimes pediatricians pick up on a pattern of edginess that cannot be explained by all the usual suspects:  teething, food sensitivity, temperament.  Having a baby who complains bitterly about the most common events, such as diaper changes and nursing, can take over a parent’s life and make them question their sanity.

Judging by the research literature, you would think that sensory sensitivity only happens to toddlers or preschoolers!  Those 4 year-olds who refuse to wear shirts with long sleeves and cannot handle a car ride without vomiting often started out as super-fussy babies.  Their parents may have tried the lactation consultant, the pediatrician, maybe even the neurologist, in a frantic search for help.  They could have used an OT.

I have treated babies as young as 6 months-old that displayed clear signs of sensory sensitivity after prolonged periods of peri-natal NICU stays or procedures.  Why would a few months in the NICU make a baby sensory-averse to diaper changes and being held?  Well, look at it from the perspective of an immature nervous system.  They got more stimulation than they could handle, and their brains responded by interpreting everything as a potentially invasive experience.  Turns out, a good percentage of children who require intensive and ongoing medical procedures to save their lives don’t recall the experience, but their body does. Ask psychiatrists doing fMRIs, or functional MRI’s, what they see in adult trauma victims.  Parts of the brain that encode emotion and memory will light up like Christmas trees when faced with innocuous stimuli.  Oops.

Progressive NICU’s are making changes, but those nurses have no choice to perform multiple and invasive procedures and do them in a very stimulating environment.  They are working hard at a very difficult task; saving the lives of really tiny, really sick babies.

Is a NICU stay the only way to become a sensory-averse infant?  Not at all.  It seems some infants are just wired to be more sensitive, and some babies need only a little bit of extra excitement to become sensitive.  I treated an infant under 6 months of age that struggled to nurse.  She had the oral motor skills to suck, the swallowing skills to avoid choking, but she disliked the feel of her mother’s skin touching her face.  She nursed until she wasn’t starving, then refused any more.  Her mother felt rejected and not in love with her little girl any more.  The baby wasn’t growing and was constantly agitated.  We worked hard in therapy to help this baby, but until we realized what the problem was, every time her mom tried to get her to nurse more, she was repeating the cycle of aversion and agitation.

My approach for my youngest sensory-averse clients combines everything I know from Happiest Baby on the Block and all my training in sensory processing theory and practice as a pediatric occupational therapist.  The first step is convincing parents that they didn’t cause this behavior, and then convincing them that there is treatment that works.  Combining calming sensory input, environmental adaptations, and skill building in these little babies can make a huge difference in their lives and their family’s experience.  If your baby is incredible fussy and no one can find a good reason, pursue pediatric occupational therapy with an experienced therapist.  It could calm things down more quickly than you think!

Your Gifted Child: More Than An Amazing Intellect

 

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The characteristic that convinces a parent that their child is gifted is often an impressive vocabulary or mathematical ability.  This is the criteria that will get them into the “G and T” program in school, and is often a source of pride for both parents and children.  Wait!  There are other characteristics of giftedness that aren’t always so well received.  Making the most of a powerful brain will sometimes mean addressing all the effects of giftedness on behavior, emotional reactions, social interaction and even physiology.

My primary point in writing this post is to mention that giftedness brings with it a host of abilities, and managing all them effectively will be your child’s lifelong challenge.  Poorly managed, a child can struggle internally or fail to use their gifts with joy.  Success starts with parental awareness and support.

Your gifted child, from toddlerhood onward, may demonstrate common patterns of behavior or thinking that can be challenging for parents:

  • intense feelings and reactions
  • high sensitivity to other’s feelings
  • idealism and a sense of justice, intolerance of rigid rules at school or home
  • daydreaming or preoccupation with own thoughts
  • intense focus on specific tasks or topics, ignores other’s interests
  • unusual sense of humor and playing with objects in atypical ways
  • vivid imaginations, including imaginary playmates
  • difficulty tolerating classroom routines and simple games
  • less interest in playing with peers; seeks out older children or adults
  • worries or becomes fearful of anticipated events or things they don’t understand

When children are assessed by a psychologist and found to have asynchrony in their development (a fancy term that describes a chart of testing scores that look like the Alps:  high in some areas, average or below average in others), this can add to the frustration of living as a gifted child.  Preschoolers with advanced cognition but poor articulation of speech cannot express themselves but are thinking amazing thoughts.  This is so frustrating for them!  Super-sensitive children may pick up on a teacher’s stress over her home life just by her posture and her energy level.  They know that something bad is going on, and wonder if they should be concerned.  Children with sensory sensitivity complain about scratchy shirts, irritating lights and can have difficulty with typical levels of noise, scents or movement.

Gifted kids can be incredible negotiators, remember every promise you make and hold to to them,  develop sarcasm to control people, or try to influence every game so that it reflects their strong interests.  They can be overwhelmed by commercials requesting donations for animals or children, and become upset when they listen to adults discuss political issues.  All at 6 years of age or less!

What can parents do to help their gifted children, right from the start?  Notice which characteristics seem to be most difficult for your child to handle.  Some kids are irritated by stimulation from the physical world, some are under stimulated or simply lonely for sure peers at school, and some are overwhelmed by emotions.  They are like snowflakes; each one is different.

Support your gifted child where she needs it most.  Energetic kids need lots to do, and ways to calm down.  Sensitive kids need to learn ways to manage the world without being overstimulated.  Children who wear their hearts on their sleeves can take action to help others and understand how many adults are working for the same purpose as we speak.

Gifted children who learn to manage all the characteristics of giftedness are the leaders of the future, the innovators, and the people that will bring us forward.  With the right support and understanding, they can use their abilities freely and joyously!

Is Your Sensitive Child Gifted As Well?

Happy New Year!  The topic of sensitivity (in all it’s expressions) in young children isn’t new to this blog, but the correlation with giftedness hasn’t been a part of my other posts.  It is today.

Sensitivity is common in gifted toddlers and preschoolers, and sensitivity is ubiquitous in young children with diagnoses such as ASD and SPD.  Could you have both?  Sure.  Could you have neither, and just have a very sensitive little soul who avoids socks with seams and still can’t spell their name at 5?  Sure.  Seeing the pattern of sensitivity that gifted children can express isn’t that easy, but it can make dealing with a young child so much easier when you understand the source and know how to support them.

Gifted children make mental and emotional connections that other children their age do not.  They see and feel the world differently.  They are still young children, without fully developed emotional regulation, and they bear the weight of all that they perceive.  It can  accumulate throughout the day and over time, and overtake them.  You can see more outbursts, more episodes of being overwhelmed, and more crushing waves of emotion.  Strong emotions are common with the gifted populations, and they can be more challenging during the toddler years.  Remember: not every aspect of brain development is advanced at the same level in gifted children.  In many ways, your 3 year-old who reads chapter books is still just 3!

Our brains do not have barriers, so emotional and cognitive floods will create sensory floods as well.  This is something that every adult can understand:  if you have had a fight with your partner, it is more likely that the bright sunshine will bother you a bit more, the TV will seem too loud, and the people in line at a store are crowding you a bit more than you’d like.  You are an adult, so you can take action to reduce your sensitivity (sunglasses, remote control, choosing a shorter line or leaving) but children cannot.  They do not even know what is making them uncomfortable.  And they often cannot put feelings into words, even if they can tell you all about every dinosaur or how tornadoes affect the planet.  Emotional maturity and expression is not always developing at the same amazing pace as cognitive skills in gifted toddlers and preschoolers.

What can you do to help a gifted and sensitive child?  The general methods to address  sensory sensitivity will be helpful for these children.  OT’s use a wide range of physical and behavioral strategies effectively, about which I will write about in more detail later this week.  Verbally gifted children may be able to comprehend an explanation of why they explode the way that they do, and they may even be able to help you create a plan to help themselves.  Loving your child isn’t enough, but accepting the entirety of who they are can go a long way to making life easier with your sensitive gifted young child.

I will be writing more about this topic in 2017, and hoping to expand my posts to an e- book and a few local lectures.  Please comment here, and let me know if there are specific issues with sensitivity and the gifted child that you would like to see posted!