Tag Archives: sensory processing treatment

Does Your Child “Trace” the Room’s Perimeter or Hate Big Spaces? There is a Sensory-Based Explanation

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Space; the final frontier?

When you see it, it looks like Helen Keller crossed with a Roomba.  A child enters a space, even a familiar space, and runs the perimeter without stopping to play or examine things.  They may trace the room with their fingers, or repeat this process many times before they “land” and engage in some kind of purposeful activity.  If they get upset or challenged, they may resume this behavior.

One explanation for this behavior is that it is a solution to spatial processing difficulties.  When a typical child over the age of, let’s say 14 months, enters a room, they use their visual and auditory skills to tell them about the shape, height, and contents of the room.  As we mature, we use higher-order sensory input to inform our awareness and thinking.  We use sound in particular to tell us about the space to our sides and behind us that we cannot see.  Kids with ASD and SPD are stuck using immature types of information, and need to use them more often and more intensely to get the same knowledge.

How does this feel for them? Think of Notre Dame cathedral (before that awful fire).  The soaring ceilings and the long aisles create an other-worldly feeling you cannot escape.  Your brain knows you are not in your living room, or even in your own place of worship back home.  The medieval architects knew this too.  That was exactly the effect their were aiming for.  To set you back on your heels with the wonders of G-d.  How?  By making the spatial characteristics very unfamiliar and difficult to square with everyday experience.  To have you feel smaller and less in control in the presence of the almighty.

Now imagine that every space you inhabit gives you that feeling.  You enter a room and your eyes go everywhere.  You want to walk around to give yourself more information about where you are.  You don’t, but your nervous system is suggesting it.  You feel off balance and vulnerable.  Sound familiar?

What can you do?  Treating spatial processing issues isn’t easy.  Addressing limitations in vestibular and visual processing can really help, but I think that sound-based treatments are some of the easiest and most effective.  I use Quickshifts effectively to address spatial processing issues  Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation.  Of course, it is best to address all the sensory processing issues any child has to get the best results.  You want to cement in the skills of better sensory processing by achieving good functioning in multiple situations.  But spatial processing problems have to be addressed to achieve a calmer and more organized state.  You want every child to feel safe and supported wherever they go!

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Effective sensory processing treatment helps kids feel safe in big spaces

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For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance

 

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One of my most popular posts, Why “Hand-Over-Hand” Assistance Works Poorly With So Many Special Needs Children , explains how this common method of assisting children to hold and manipulate objects often results in rejection or even aversion.  This post tells you about my most successful strategy for kids with low muscle tone and limited sensory processing:  using graded resistance.

Why does making it harder to move work better?  Because if the child is actively trying to reach and grasp an object, you are providing more tactile, kinesthetic and proprioceptive information for their brain.  More information = better quality movement.  Your accurately graded resistance is doing what weighted/pressure vests, foot weights and SPIO suits do for the rest of their body.  Could you use a hand weight or weighted object?  Maybe, but little children have little hands with limited space to place a weight, and weights don’t distribute force evenly.  Did you take physics in school?  Then you know that gravity exerts a constant pressure in one direction.  Hands move in 3-D.  Oh, well.  So much for weighting things.

How do you know how much force to use?  Just enough to allow the child to move smoothly.  Its a dance in which you constantly monitor their effort and grade yours to allow movement to continue.

Where do you place the force?  That one is a little trickier.  It helps to have some knowledge of biomechanics, but I can tell you that it isn’t always on their hand.  Not because they won’t like it, but because it may not deliver the correct force. Often your force can be more proximal, meaning closer to the shoulder than the hand.  That would provide more information for the joints and muscles that stabilize the arm, steadying it so the hand can be guided accurately.   If a child has such a weak grasp that they cannot maintain a hold while pushing or pulling, you may be better off moving the object, not the hand,  while they hold the object, rather than holding their hand.

Still getting aversive responses from the child?  It may be because the child doesn’t want to engage in your activity, or they don’t realize that you are helping them.  They  may think that adults touch them to remove objects from their grasp or otherwise stop them from exploring.  Both can be true.  In that case, make sure that you are offering the child something that they want to do first.  Remember, we can’t force anyone to play.  The desire to engage has to come from them, or it isn’t play.  Its just adults making a kid do something that we think is good for them.

 

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One of the most amazing places I have ever seen:  Australia!