Tag Archives: sensory diets

Pillowfort at Target: Should You Ask Your OT Before You Click “Buy”?

There are so many families out there that need great equipment for their sensory kids.  Pillowfort materials are on sale at Target, one of my favorite big box stores.  The items are affordable and stylish.  But are they what you really need?  In order to get the products that serve your child’s needs, you may want to think beyond color and style.  The key to good equipment is having a big picture plan.  The wrong item for the wrong kid is worse than not hitting “send”.

Some good examples are their crash pad and their chair.  If you have a sensory-seeking kid, you know what abuse your couch and bed can take.  Kids tend to dive bomb them and little by little, destroy them.  Pillowfort will sell you a nice crash pad, and they use a smiling child lying prone on one of their pads in their display on Target.com.

You might want to look at the dimensions.  In my professional experience, most of my clients are looking for way more square footage to crash into.  And when they are dysregulated, which is often, they aren’t going to be able to land squarely on such a small pad.  Therapists use pad the size of a thick full mattress for a reason.  We are all safety, all the time.  And we know what works.

The rocking desk chair is another nice chair that will serve a small number of kids.  It looks pretty sturdy, but the big sensory seekers can wear out hinges really easily.  A chair that rocks is a chair that can become tippy with the right (or wrong) user.  Choose this chair only if you have a child that isn’t one of THOSE kids.

There are other choices for kids that seek movement, and they aren’t chairs.  They are sensory diets, created by therapists with years of experience in evaluating and treating your child.  Read Sensory Stimulation is not Sensory Treatment and Halloween With Sensory Sensitive Kids: The (Sensory) Tricks of the Holiday for more information on hoe Good OT treatment can help your child.

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Does Your Child Still Chew on Clothes or Toys?

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Babies love to munch on their toys.  They nibble at book bindings, chew the heck out of their loveys, and some little ones really love to chew their pacifiers.  As they grow, most children let go of this behavior.  Chewing and biting for sensory exploration and state modulation diminishes and a child’s behavior evolves into thinking, communicating, and smooth internal state regulation.

But some older kids slip their sleeve or shirt collar into their mouth whenever they can, and are left with a soggy mess by the end of the day.  They suck on their markers or the grocery store cart.  Their toys and pencils are ragged witnesses to the continuing use of oral stimulation, long past the first year or two of life.

Why do they do this?

Some kids are seeking to fill an oral cavity that is less stimulated due to low muscle tone, hypermobility and/or limited sensory discrimination.  Shoving a sleeve in there provides that sensory boost as muscles, skin and ligaments stretch.  Children that need more sensory input due to inactivity, boredom, physical limitations and illness use oral input as an always-available and independent option.  Other kids use biting and chewing to modulate their level of arousal (and open their eustachian tubes, BTW!).  While most OTs know about the modulation piece, the way biting and chewing impact hearing and even vestibular health isn’t so commonly considered.  Biting can stem nystagmus for some kids, and it can lessen dizziness or help a child move their eyes apart as they watch objects in the distance (divergence) for reading the board and for sports.  For kids that use biting well after the toddler biting phase should be over, evaluating any ocular (eye) or ENT issues can be helpful.

Exploring the level of stress in a child’s life outside the classroom or therapy clinic is another consideration.  Biting and chewing are calming proprioceptive inputs that a child can use when they are anxious or fearful, or just uncertain.  It may not be possible to impact the stress of divorce, moving to a new home, or adding a newborn to the family, but appreciating these situations as factors in behavior can improve how families, teachers and therapists respond.  Older children could be trying to modulate their level of arousal without causing trouble by running, jumping or yelling.  Chewing is less likely to be disruptive in a classroom setting.

What Can You Do Once a Chewing Habit is Established?

Once oral sensory seeking behavior takes hold, it isn’t easy to stop.  It can be very satisfying and accessible, particularly for young children.  Addressing the core cause or causes means taking things one step at a time.  Many children do well with a multi-sensory diet added to their daily activities.  More physical activity or more frequent activity breaks can help.  I find that more vestibular input in particular can be powerful.  Using whistles can be helpful when chosen well and supervised for safety and overall modulation.   Some children need to become more aware of their behaviors; older kids can use some of the “How Does Your Engine Run?” concepts to take responsibility for their behaviors and independently seek alternative sensory input.  Kids that learn mindfulness techniques can incorporate those into their program as well.

The use of chewing objects can help, but there are three concerns that have to be addressed:  hygiene, safety, and speech.  A child that sucks or chews on any object isn’t going to monitor its cleanliness, so make sure you use non-toxic soap that is carefully rinsed off.  A chewing necklace should never be worn while sleeping due to safety issues, nor can it be used when it could become snagged on branches or sports equipment.  And finally, having something in the mouth, whether it is a pacifier or a chewing toy, will minimize and alter speech if it isn’t removed for communication.  Never allow a child who is talking or learning to talk to devolve into head nods so they can keep chewing.

Looking for more information on sensory issues?  Read Sensory Sensitivity In Toddlers: Why Responding Differently to “Yucky!” Will Help Your Child and Weaning the Pacifier From An Older Child.

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Calm Your Toddler By Using “Tummy Time” for Emotional Modulation

 

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You don’t have to offer your child a tablet.  Try a book or a sticker activity instead!

Yes, tummy time.  It isn’t just for babies anymore.

Why?  Because occupational therapists know that the physical effects of working against gravity to push one’s head and shoulders up, and the firmness and warmth of contact with the floor are also sensory-based modulation strategies.  What helps babies build core control can also calm upset or disorganized toddlers and older kids.

The decrease in visual input can improve calmness and attention for those kids whose eyes dart everywhere.  Not everyone can handle a visual stimulating room.  Some children need more vestibular input to reorganize, but some do better with the stillness of “tummy time”.

How long do they need to be on their stomachs for this to work?  It depends.  Probably more than a few minutes, but if you haven’t seen signs of better modulation (better eye contact, slower breathing, more communication, less agitation) then you might need to layer on another technique  Help Your Child Develop Self-Regulation With Happiest Toddler On The Block or the Wilbarger Protocol Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?.

Having trouble convincing your child to lie on their belly?  Join them, or get a sibling to model it.  Make a special new book collection for tummy time, and only have it available at that time.  Get a tent, and add the effects of an enclosed space to tummy time to make it more deeply calming.

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Holidays Hints For Sensitive Kids

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The stores are full, your inbox is too, and you are wondering how to handle your sensitive child’s reactions to family and school events.  You are not alone.

Everyone knows about the “holiday blues”, where our dreams and expectations come up against real life:  awkward family relationships, conflicting demands on our time and finances, etc.  But for kids with sensory and emotional sensitivity (I don’t see these as always separate issues, by the way), surviving the holiday season can be very difficult indeed.  The excitement and the novelty of the holidays affect them more intensely and are not always welcome additions to their days.   Here are some suggestions to make things better:

  • Think about an event before you commit to it.  The hour of the day, the size and the activity, the duration of the event are all considerations.  You know your child, so you can identify what factors will be the most challenging and what will be easier to handle.  In general, sensitive kids do best with smaller, shorter, quieter and earlier events.
  • Create your own event around your child, and invite others to join in.  When you get to design it, you have more control over how things play out.  Some suggestions would be cookie decorating, visiting a nursery or outdoor holiday display, making wrapping paper with crayons and stickers, and watching a holiday video party.
  • Get your sensory diet activities all set up for an event that you can’t or won’t cancel. Your OT should be able to help you craft a plan to reduce your child’s overall sensitivity with input such as deep pressure, breath control, tactile input, etc.  Just ask.  Most of us would be happy to help you.
  • Do not forget the basics of keeping any child calm at an event:  enough sleep, enough to eat and drink, and being healthy enough to participate.  If your child is ill, tired, or hungry, you need to think carefully about how well he will manage, and make the decision to cancel or alter your plans.   Sometimes the situation isn’t going to be fixed with a few bounces on a therapy ball and some joint compression.  In these situations, your child isn’t any different from any other child.

 

If you are looking for ideas about how to decrease sensitivity, take a look at How to Help Sensitive Kids Handle Greeting People (Including Their Own Parents!) and Sensory Sensitivity In Toddlers: Why Responding Differently to “Yucky!” Will Help Your Child

Holidays can be fun for everyone, including sensitive children.  Plan well, be flexible, and make thoughtful choices that work for your family!