Tag Archives: potty training

Afraid to Toilet Train? Prepare Your Child… and Prepare Yourself

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I spend an extra 30 minutes at the end of a session this week helping a mom build her courage and confidence so that she felt ready to start toilet training soon.  Her child is over 3, has sensory and motor issues, but shows tons of signs for readiness:  dry diapers for increasingly long periods, tells adults when he needs to “go”, able to manage clothing, etc.  He also has no confidence in his abilities, rarely likes change or challenge, and is super-sensitive to altering routines and using new environments.  This isn’t going to be seamless.

It isn’t clear who is the more prepared individual, but I think it could be the child.

This mom read my favorite marketplace book on training “Oh Crap”, and she needs to re-read it with an eye to the many ways in which her child fits the picture of a child that could NEVER be fully ready to train.  This species is so averse to novelty and challenge that no treat or toy is a great enough reward.  Nothing is more frightening to them than failure, and you simply cannot miss the diaper.  It is familiar, fail-proof, and allows children to never have to monitor their body signals or stop watching Paw Patrol to go to the potty.  Ever.

This child is likely to be experiencing the normal sensations of fullness and pressure (as the bladder and rectum fill) as uncomfortable and a little scary.  This interoceptive input can be one that children are sensitive to in the same way that the find seams on clothes or lying down for a diaper change unpleasant.  He requires a lot of support to tolerate and process tactile input and vestibular input, so it isn’t exactly surprising that he would find interoceptive sensation difficult to handle.  Adding a new routine for dealing with elimination, placing it in a room he rarely uses (the bathroom) and being old enough to know that he could “fail” and old enough to absorb outside comments about being “dirty” is more than enough to make this harder than it should be.

My suggestions to this mom included:

  • Adding more vocabulary to her discussions about toilet training.  Speaking about the feelings of pressure and fullness, the actions of pushing the poop out gently, and cleaning/wiping with clear messaging that this is a learning experience that nobody does perfectly.  Hearing that his parents had “accidents” when they were little, and that every child will have accidents, well, this could really help both of them.
  • Dressing him lightly, or choosing to go naked or just underpants (I like two layers of training pants if they still fit his tiny heine!) so that there are fewer barriers to making it to the potty means she may need to shop for training garments.
  • Planning the environment if she is going to let him go naked.  All living events except sleeping need to happen in places where accidents can be cleaned up easily.  She isn’t averse to staining the carpet, but I assured her that her child knows not to spill things on that carpet.  He is too old not to interpret soiling it as a failure.  When she runs to clean it up, he will feel badly.  If she doesn’t have to rush and shows no stress, he will relax about the almost inevitable accident.  He NEEDS  the confidence to move forward.
  • Consider more media about toileting and the arc of learning.  Most children don’t like to talk about things that distress them.  But they LOVE to read about others who are going through the same things.  I suggested that she weave in some new books about characters who are learning to use the toilet, and add comments about their feelings as they learn.  This would include how excited and proud the character is.  Proud can be a new word in his vocabulary!

 

Training a child that has low tone?  I wrote an e-book for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is filled with preparation ideas, strategies to address the common issues of sensory processing limitations and the behavioral effects of low tone, and even includes a guide to building readiness instead of waiting for it to arrive!  You can find it on my website Tranquil Babies,  on Amazon  , and on a terrific site for occupational therapy materials, Your Therapy Source

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How Being Toilet Trained Changes Your Child’s Life

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Think your child doesn’t care that he is wearing pull-ups in pre-K?  Well, he might not…yet.  After all, he doesn’t know another life.  He has been using a diaper (because we know that pull-ups aren’t anything other than a diaper, right?) for elimination since his first day of life.  Wait until he is trained, and you may see the difference that being trained will make for him.

Children who have accomplished toilet training have made a significant step forward in independence.  They are the masters of their domain, to borrow from Seinfeld.  Not needing help for something so personal, they have a different attitude about body ownership and privacy.  This is important and personally meaningful.  We want children to have pride in their bodies and a sense that they own them.  Even though you would never harm your child, when you are involved in their “business”, you are taking some of that pure ownership away.  The sooner they have a sense that they can manage alone, or with only a bit of help for the hard bits, they build their sense of self.

When kids master a major life skill, they often are more willing to take on other skills such as writing and dressing.  They are interested in holding their spoon and fork the “grown-up” way.  They have entered the world of the older child, in their minds.  And adults aren’t immune.  We see potty trained kids differently too.  When they are able to take care of themselves in the bathroom, we start raising our expectations for them as well, and treat them as older children, not babies.  And they react to our change in perception as well.  Toilet training can lift everyone up!

The practical realities of life mean that being trained allows them to go to activities and even schools that they wouldn’t be able to attend.  Pools and camps have rules, and being fully engaged with their community means being out there and participating as much as possible.

A mom told me yesterday that her 5 year-old told her “I am so happy that I can use the potty!”  It took him a long time to get all the skills together to be fully trained, and he is off on a family cruise next week.  This will be the first time he can attend cruise camp with his older brother.  He has arrived!

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Toilet Training For Preschool And Stuck in Neutral? Here’s Why…..

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Many of my clients are in a rush to get their kid trained in the next few weeks for school. They have been making some headway over the summer, but things can stall out half-way through.  Here are some common reasons (but probably not all of them) why kids hit a plateau:

  1. They lose that initial boost of excitement in achieving a “big kid” milestone.  Using the potty isn’t an accomplishment now, it is just a chore.
  2. Parents and caregivers aren’t able to keep up the emotional rewards they need.  It is hard to be as excited about the 10th poop in the potty as the first time.
  3. The rewards used aren’t rewarding anymore.  A sticker or a candy might not be enough to pull someone away from Paw Patrol.
  4. An episode of constipation or any other negative physical experience has them worried.  Even a little bit of difficulty can discourage a toddler.
  5. Too many accidents or not enough of a result when they are really trying can also discourage a child.
  6. Using the potty is now a power play.  Some kids need to feel in control, and foiling a parent’s goal of toileting gives them the feeling that they are the ones running the show.  “I won’t” feels so much better than “I did it” for these kids.
  7. Their clothes are a barrier.  When some families start training, it is in the buff or with just underwear.  Easy to make it to the potty in time.  With clothes on, especially with button-top pants or long shirts, it can be a race to get undressed before things “happen”.
  8. They haven’t been taught the whole process.  “Making” is so much more than eliminating.  Check out How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There” and The Ten Most Common Mistakes Parents Make During Toilet Training for some ideas on how to teach the whole enchilada.  And if you need a great book for kids without developmental or motor delays, look at my review A Great Toilet Training Book for Neurotypical Kids: Oh Crap Potty Training!.

Should you pause training? The answer is not always to take a break.  I know it sounds appealing to both adults and kids, but saying that this isn’t important any longer has a serious downside.  If your child has had some success, you can keep going but change some of your approaches so that they don’t get discouraged or disinterested.  If your child really wasn’t physically or cognitively ready, those are good reasons to regroup.  But most typically-developing kids over 2 are neurologically OK for training.  They may need to develop some other skills to deal with the bumps in the road that come along for just about every child.

Sometimes addressing each one of these issues will move training to the next level quickly!  Take a look at this list and see if you can pick out a few that look like the biggest barriers, and hack away at them today!

For kids with low muscle tone, including kids with ASD and SPD, take a look at my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  Read Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!) to understand why I wrote this book just for you!   

I give parents clear readiness guidelines and tips on everything from the best equipment, the best way to handle fading rewards, to using the potty outside of your home.  It also includes an entire chapter on overcoming these bumps in the road! To learn more about what my e-book can do for you, read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There”

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Potty training is a process.  For most kids, the final frontier is managing bowel movements.  Compared to learning to pee into the toilet, little kids are often more stressed by bowel movements and have less opportunities to practice.  Most children don’t have more than one BM per day, but they urinate many times per day.  For an overview on wiping, even if your child doesn’t have low tone, read Low Tone and Toilet Training: Teaching Toddlers to Wipe

Constipation or just the discomfort of normal elimination can make them wary, sometimes enough to convince some children that this is a process better done in a diaper.  In comparison, urination isn’t an uncomfortable experience for healthy children.  Bowel movements sometimes happen only a few times a week, instead of the multiple times a child needs to urinate per day.  Less practice and fewer opportunities for rewards (even if your reward is warm praise) make bowel training harder.

So when they finally make the leap and manage to do #2 in the toilet, a lot of parents decide to delay teaching their child how to wipe themselves.  After all, wiping can be messy and it has to be done well enough for good hygiene.  Here are my top suggestions to make “making” a complete success:

  1. Teaching should still be part of your narrative while you are the one doing the wiping.  In my book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Tone, I teach parents how to transform daily diapering into pre-teaching.  While you are wiping, and even while you are waiting for them to finish on the toilet, your positive narrative about learning this skill doesn’t end.  You are telling your child how it’s done, in detail, as you are doing it. You convey with your words, your tone and your body language that this is a learn-able skill.
  2. Don’t forget the power of the “dry run”.  Practice with your child when he is in the bathroom, whether it is before bath time, before dressing, or during a special trip to the bathroom to practice.  Dry runs take away the mess but teach your child’s brain the motor planning needed to lean back, reach back and move that hand in the correct pattern.  The people that invented the Kandoo line of wipes have an amusing way to practice posted on their site:  spread peanut or sunflower butter on a smooth plate, and give your child some wipes or TP.  Tell him to clean the plate completely.  This is a visual and motor experience that teaches how much work it is to clean his tush well.  After this practice, your child will make a real effort, not just wave the paper around.  Brilliant!
  3. Will you have to reward him for this practice? Possibly.  It doesn’t have to be food or toys.  It could be the ability to choose tonight’s dessert for the family, or reading an extra two books at bedtime.  You decide on the reward based on your values and your child’s desires.
  4. Use good tools.  The adult-sized wet wipe is your friend.  The extra sensory information of a wet wipe versus a wad of dry paper is helpful when vision isn’t an option.  They are less likely to be dropped accidentally when clean, but having a good hold is especially important after it has been used. “Yucky”stuff  makes kids not want to hold on!  Wet wipes are more likely to wipe that little tush cleanly.  Don’t cut corners.  Allow your child to use more than one.
  5. Take turns.  Who wipes first and who bats “clean-up” (couldn’t resist that one!) is your decision.  Some children want you to make sure they are clean before they try, and some are insistent that they go first with anything.  This can change depending on mood and even time of day.  Be flexible, but don’t stand there like a foreman, ordering work but not willing to help out.  One of my favorite strategies is to always offer help, but be rather slow and inefficient.  This gives children the chance to rise to the occasion but still feel like you are always willing to support them.
  6. Teach them how to know when they are done wiping.  It’s kinda simple;  you wipe until the toilet paper is clean when you wipe.  This usually means little kids have to do at least two separate wipes, but they get the idea quicker.  Little hands are not that skilled, but dirty versus clean is something they can grasp.

 

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Take a look at my e-book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your child With Low Muscle Tone to get a clear understanding of how to prepare for and execute your plan without tears on both sides.  Will it help you even if your child doesn’t have low muscle tone?  Of course!  Most of my techniques simply speed up the learning process for typically-developing children.  And who doesn’t want to make potty independence happen faster?

This e-book is available on my website tranquil babies, at Your Therapy Source (a great site for parents and therapists), and on Amazon.  Read more about my book with Amazon’s “look inside” section, or by reading The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

Teach Kids With EDS Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In!

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People who have read my blog are aware that I wrote a book on toilet training, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone. The issue of kids who “hold it in” didn’t make it into the book, but perhaps it should have. Children that have problems with muscle tone or connective tissue integrity (or both) risk current and future issues with incontinence and UITs if they overstretch their bladder or bowel too far. We teach little girls to wipe front-to-back to prevent UTIs. We need to teach all children to avoid “holding it in” in the same manner that we discourage them from w-sitting.

I am specifically speaking here about kids with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Down Syndrome and all the other conditions that create pelvic weakness and muscle control issues. But even if your child has idiopathic low tone (meaning that there is no identified cause) this can still become a problem.

The effects of low tone and poor tissue integrity on toilet training are legion. Many of them are sensory-based, a situation that gets very little acknowledgment from pediatricians. These children simply don’t feel the pressure of their full bladder or even a full rectum with the same intensity or discomfort that other children experience. This is known as poor interoception, a sensory-based issue that is rarely discussed, even by parents and occupational therapists that are well versed in other sensory processing issues.  For more on how sensory problems affect toilet training, see Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!).   Kids that don’t accurately perceive fullness can be “camels” sometimes, holding it in with no urge to go, and have to be reminded to void. It can be more convenient for the busy child to keep playing rather than go to the bathroom, or it can save a shy child from the embarrassment of public bathrooms; she prefers to wait until she returns home to “go”.

This is not a good idea at all! The bladder is a muscle that can be overstretched in the same way the hip muscles loosen in children who “W-sit”. Don’t overstretch muscles and then expect them to work well. In addition, the ligaments that support the bladder are subject to the same sensory-based issues that affect other ligaments in the body: once stretched, they don’t bounce back. Holding urine instead of eliminating just stretches vulnerable ligaments out.  A weak pelvic floor is nothing to ignore. Ask older women who have had a few pregnancies how that is working out for them.  Read Is Your Constipated Toddler Also Having Bladder Accidents? Here Are Three Possible Reasons Why to learn why you should be connecting both types of incontinence and taking action sooner rather than later.

For children with connective tissue disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, another comorbidity (commonly occurring disorder) is interstitial cystitis (IC).  What does that feel like? The pain of a bad urinary tract infection without any bacterial infection.  Anything that irritates the walls of the bladder adds stress to tissue.  Regular elimination cannot prevent IC, but good bladder care could minimize problems.  Not holding it in is part of good bladder care.

The stretch receptors in both the abdominal wall and in the bladder wall that should be telling a child with low tone that it is time to tinkle just don’t get enough stretch stimulation to do so when they have been extended too far.

When should you teach a child not to hold it in?  Right from the start.  The time to prevent problems is when a child is developing toileting habits, not when problems have developed.  One way to encourage children to use the bathroom is to make it optimally accessible.  Read Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child? and see if this affordable potty will help your child feel confident and independent right away!

So….an essential part of toileting education for children is when to head to the bathroom. If your child has low muscle tone or a connective tissue disorder that creates less sensory-based information for them, the easiest solution is a routine or a schedule. They use the bathroom whether they feel they need to or not. The older ones can notice how much they are voiding, and that tells them that they really did need to “go”.   The little ones can be rewarded for good listening.

Understanding that the kidneys will fill up a child’s bladder after a large drink in about 35-45 minutes is helpful. But it can always be the right time to hit the bathroom shortly after a meal, before leaving the house, or when returning home. As long as it is routine and relatively frequent, it may not matter how a toileting schedule is created. Just make sure that as they grow up, they are told why this is important. A continent child may not believe that this is preventing accidents, but a child who has a history of embarrassing accidents in public may be your best student.

Many kids with hypermobility have bedwetting issues long after most kids are continent at night.  It helps to tell them why this may be an issue for them.  Without that discussion, kids often assume that there is something inherently wrong with them as people.  Don’t let your child’s self-esteem drop because they don’t understand why this is such a hard thing to accomplish.  Understanding also makes them more willing to follow a toileting schedule or to focus on developing interoceptive awareness.  If you are wondering if your child’s hypermobility has emotional and behavioral impact, read How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Regulation in Children and Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior .

For little girls who are at a higher risk of UTIs, I tell parents to teach wiping after urination as a “pat-pat” rather than the standard recommendation of front-to-back wiping.  Why?  Because children aren’t really good at remember that awkward movement, and even if you are standing right their reminding her, she may just wipe back-to-front because that is easier and more natural.  “Pat-pat” is an easy movement and reduces her risk of fecal contamination.  I cannot tell you I have done hard research on this strategy reducing infections, but then, I have common sense.  This is the smarter way for her to wipe.  Want more info on wiping?  Check out How To Teach Your Toddler To Wipe “Back There”

Maybe you have the opposite problem; a child who doesn’t know that they need to head to the bathroom until the last moment.  Read For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up for a simple strategy to increase sensory awareness and help them connect the dots in time to make it to the potty!

The good news in all of this? Perceiving sensory feedback can be improved. There are higher-tech solutions like biofeedback, but children can also become more aware without tech. There are physical therapists that work on pelvic and core control, but some children will also do well with junior Kegel practice and education and building awareness of the internal sensations of fullness and urgency.  Many occupational therapists use the Wilbarger Protocol for general proprioceptive awareness.  If your child has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, please read Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? for information on how to use this treatment technique wisely.

Good luck, and please share your best strategies here for other parents!!

 

Looking for more toilet training information?

My e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, has readiness checklists that help you decide what skills to work on right away, and detailed strategies for every stage of training.  I want children to become independent and confident, and for parents to feel good about their role in guiding kids to develop this important life skill.

If you are interested in purchasing The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, please visit my website, tranquil babies and click on “e-book” at the top ribbon. You can also buy it on Amazon and your therapy source

Piddlers Make Potty Training Fun!

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Your son will eagerly run for potty time!

I laughed out loud the first time I saw a toddler pee onto one of these circles.  Then he asked for more juice so that he could come back later and try again!

Piddlers aren’t a new concept.  Parents have been tossing cereal circles into a potty for “aiming practice” for a long time.  These commercially-made circles are just easier to aim for, dissolve more, and clean up easily.  Cereal has a funny way of bouncing around in the toilet, making it more frustrating, not as successful and not as much fun.

Getting children motivated to use the toilet can be a big headache.  For every totally cooperative toddler, there are 5 more that are defiant or simply uninterested.  They just won’t “go”.  Piddlers may not be a total answer, but they can get your son over these barriers to skill development.  Once a child is successful and has a routine, things are so much better!

Little boys have to control their aim if they are going to urinate standing up.  This is a totally new concept for them, and a skill.  Yes, a skill.  Since they have been using a diaper for elimination from the day they came home from the hospital, toilet training is a completely foreign concept, from beginning to end.  It’s a little bit funny: mostly the mommies are in control of toilet training, but only brothers, cousins and daddies can demo this particular skill.   Read Low Tone and Toilet Training: Kids Need To See How It’s Done to understand why a live performance can jump-start your child’s comprehension of toilet use.

Piddlers are made of starch and food coloring, and won’t turn anything blue or orange.  You may not even need the whole package!  Once a child has success and has developed a routine, explain that you need to go to the store later to buy more (not really), but he can use the potty right now anyway without one or two Piddlers in the potty.  Eventually you won’t need Piddlers any more, but you will have a little boy that is paying attention to what he is doing in the bathroom!

Great News!  My book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, is now available as an e-book on my website, tranquil babies .  Just click the “e-book” section on the top ribbon to get your copy.  

Don’t think your child is ready for toilet training?  You need this book more than the parents of kids that are struggling with training!  Knowing how to prepare your child and yourself before you start training can make all the difference.  My book will explain in detail what you need to know and how you can start developing potty skills…today!

Waiting for Toilet Training Readiness? Create It Instead!

 

 

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Fall has arrived in New York, and toddlers know the best way to enjoy it!

I just watched a therapist on YouTube tell parents how to look for toilet training readiness signs.  From her limited description, you would have a better chance of finding truffles in France!

The signs of readiness in special needs children can be subtle, so do not ignore moves such as going behind the couch before having a bowel movement (if they can anticipate it, they can do it in the potty, too) and jumping around a bit before urinating into a diaper.   A lot of signs are not that hard to see.  Low Tone and Toilet Training: The 4 Types of Training Readiness  Other than the physiological ability to keep a diaper dry for 1.5-2 hours, which is reached around 18-24 months, most of the other types of readiness can be facilitated.  Even in special needs kids.    And I am not taking about forcing any child to use the toilet.  Ever.

The good news is that you can create more readiness without force.  You shift their awareness, give them vocabulary, engage them in elimination events, and through it all, you inspire them.  Sounds simple, but it takes some thought and effort.  It is totally worth it, from the savings on diapers to the decreased stress on you and your child when you do start training.  Jamie Glowacki, the author of a terrific book “Oh Crap Potty Training” takes a risk and challenges the idea that children will naturally be ready.  She thinks that there are children that will really never be “ready”, as in eager to train.  You probably know if your kid is in this category.  They weren’t ready for a sippy cup, or to let go of the pacifier, or switch from a crib to a toddler bed.  They hate change and they enjoy controlling situations much more than they care about consequences or praise.  Admit it:  you know if this is your kid.  They need your help to be ready.  Give it to them.

Not every child needs your help to become ready for toilet training.  I know plenty of parents who say that at least one of their children really self-trained.  Sounds hard to believe, but a motivated and attentive toddler that has been watching an older sibling…well, they have been taking notes!  They just need a little bit of encouragement, and off they go.  “Go” as in go to the bathroom.

Creating more readiness in toddlers that aren’t self-starters isn’t hard.  When you diaper them, you narrate and explain.  It sounds silly at first to do so, but children are sponges and absorb more than you think.  You are inviting them to attend, not encouraging them to watch the TV while you wipe them off and strap a diaper on them in standing.  Have them participate by holding wipes or clean clothes, go get a clean diaper for you, and when they are ready, have them toss out a well-wrapped dirty diaper.

Let them see how it’s done.  I wrote a post on this, Low Tone and Toilet Training: Kids Need To See How It’s Done  so I am not going to go into the details here.  Let’s just say that a picture is worth a thousand words.  The less language a child has, the more your demo helps them to understand the process.

Read those potty books, watch those potty videos.  Not just your child, but you too.  If you are watching and reading with them, you are communicating that you value the idea of their participation. Speak about their eventual independence in terms that inspire.  Not pressuring them, inspiring.  We talk about how they will go to school one day, be a mommy or a daddy one day.  This is something closer to the horizon, but if it is spoken about as a far-away event, well, it will be.

Help has arrived!  My book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, is available on my website, tranquil babies, and as a clothbound hard copy when you contact me through the site.  Read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Help Has Arrived! to learn why my innovative book design and detailed information on toilet training will help you make immediate progress, regardless of your child’s current abilities.