Tag Archives: positioning and feeding

Need a Desk Chair for Your Hypermobile School-Age Child? Check out the Giantex Chair

71ASiKXBSJL._AC_SL1200_.jpgOne of my colleagues with a hypermobile third-grader told me this chair has been a great chair at school for her child.  It hits a lot of my targets for a good chair recommendation, so here it is:  The Giantex chair.

Why do I like it so much?

  • It is a bit adaptable and it is sized for kids.  No chair fits every child, but the more you can adjust a chair, the more likely you are to provide good supportive seating.  This chair is a good balance of adaptability and affordability.  My readers know I am not a fan of therapy balls as seating for homework when a child is hypermobile.  Here’s why: Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork?
  • It isn’t institutional.  Teachers, parents, and especially kids, get turned off by chairs that look like medical equipment.  This looks like a regular chair, but when adjusted correctly, it IS medical equipment, IMPO.
  • It’s affordable.  The child I described got it paid for by her school district to use in her classroom, but this chair is within the budget of some families.  They can have two; one at school and one at home for homework or meals.  Most kids aren’t too eager to use a Tripp Trapp chair after 6 or 7. That chair is a hit with many therapists, but it’s untraditional looks bother a lot of older children.  This chair isn’t going to turn them off as easily.
  • This chair looks like it would last through some growth.  I tell every parent that they only thing I can promise you is that your child will grow.  Even the kids with genetic disorders that affect growth will grow larger eventually.  This chair should fit kids from 8-12 years of age in most cases.  The really small ones or the really tall ones?  Maybe not, but the small ones will grow into it, and the tall kids probably fit into a smaller adult chair now, or in the near future.

For more helpful posts on hypermobile kids, read Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection StrategiesHow To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” and When Writing Hurts: The Hypermobile Hand.

And of course, if you are a parent who is frustrated with how little help you are getting from your pediatrician or your therapy team, look below to learn more about my e-book that is designed to empower you today!

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Want more information to help your older child and make life easier?  My newest book has finally arrived!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume Two: The School Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon and a printable download on Your Therapy Source .  It is filled with the practical information that parents and therapists need to make kids’ lives easier, safer, and more independent.  Your Therapy Source has created book bundles, discounting all of my books when you buy more than one, making it more affordable to get the information you need.

There are extensive forms and checklists for school and home, and strategies that make immediate improvements in a child’s life.  Learn how to buy and fill a backpack that doesn’t damage a child’s joints, how blankets can create more pain and sleep problems,  and how to help a child write and keyboard with greater control.  Read more about it here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

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The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

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My first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, was a wonderful experience to write and share.  The number of daily hits on one of my most popular blog posts  Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children helped me figure out what my next e-book topic should be: hypermobility.

Hypermobility is a symptom that affects almost every aspect of a family’s life.  Unlike autism or cerebral palsy, online resources for parents are so limited and so generic that it was obvious that what was needed was solid practical information using everyday language.  Being empowered starts with knowledge and confidence.

The result?  My new e-book:  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility.  Volume One:  The Early Years.

What makes this book unique?

  • This manual explains how and why joint instability creates challenges in the simplest tasks of everyday life.
  • The sensory and behavioral consequences of hypermobility aren’t ignored; they are fully examined, and strategies to manage them are discussed in detail.
  • Busy parents can quickly spot the chapter that answers their questions by reading the short summaries at the beginning and end of each chapter.
  • This book emphasizes practical solutions over theories and medical jargon.
  • Parents learn how to create greater safety at home and in the community.
  • The appendices are forms that parents can use to improve communication with babysitters, family, teachers and doctors.

Who should read this book?

  1. Parents of hypermobile children ages 0-6, or children functioning in this developmental range.
  2. Therapists looking for new ideas for treatment or home programs.
  3. New therapists, or therapists who are entering pediatrics from another area of practice.
  4. Special educators, and educators that have hypermobile children mainstreamed into their classroom.

Looking for a preview?  Here is a sample from Chapter Three:  Positioning and Seating:

Some Basic Principles of Positioning:

Therapists learn the basics of positioning in school, and take advanced certification courses to be able to evaluate and prescribe equipment for their clients.  Parents can learn the basics too, and I feel strongly that it is essential to impart at least some of this information to every caregiver I meet.  A child’s therapists can help parents learn to use the equipment they have and help them select new equipment for their home.  The following principle are the easiest and most important principles of positioning for parents to learn:

  • The simplest rule I teach is “If it looks bad, it probably IS bad.”  Even without knowing the principles of positioning, or knowing what to do to fix things, parents can see that their child looks awkward or unsteady.  Once they recognize that their child isn’t in a stable or aligned position, they can try to improve the situation.  If they don’t know what to do, they can ask their child’s therapist for their professional advice.
  • The visual target is to achieve symmetrical alignment: a position in which a straight line is drawn through the center of a child”s face, down thorough the center of their chest and through the center of their pelvis.  Another visual target is to see that the natural curves of the spine (based on age) are supported.  Children will move out of alignment of course, but they should start form this symmetrical position.  Good movements occurs around this centered position.
  • Good positioning allows a child a balance of support and mobility.  Adults need to provide enough support, but also want to allow as much independent movement as possible.
  • The beginning of positioning is to achieve a stable pelvis.  Without a stable pelvis, stability at the feet, shoulders and head will be more difficult to achieve.  This can be accomplished by a combination of a waist or seatbelt, a cushion, and placing a child’s feet flat on a stable surface.
  • Anticipate the effects of activity and fatigue on positioning.  A child’s posture will shift as they move around in a chair, and this will make it harder for them to maintain a stable position.
  • Once a child is positioned as well as possible, monitor and adjust their position as needed.  Children aren’t crockpots; it isn’t possible to “set it and forget it.”  A child that is leaning too far to the side or too far forward, or whose hips have slid forward toward the front of the seat, isn’t necessarily tired.  They may simple need repositioning.
  • Equipment needs can change over time, even if a child is in a therapeutic seating system.  Children row physically and develop new skills that create new positioning needs.  If a child is unable to achieve a reasonable level of postural stability, they may need adjustments or new equipment.  This isn’t a failure; positioning hypermobile children is a fluid experience.

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume One:  The Early Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon.com

It is available as a click-through and printable download  on Your Therapy Source!  

NEW:  Your Therapy Source is selling my new book along with The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone as a bundle, saving you money and giving you a complete resource for the early years!

Already bought the book?  Please share your comments and suggestions for the next two books!  Volume Two is coming out in spring 2020, and will address the challenges of raising the school-aged child, and Volume Three focuses on the tween, teen, and young adult with hypermobility!

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Good Posture for Kids With Feeding Issues Matters

Feeding challenges are a huge source of concern for parents of children with low tone, autism, and a host of other issues.  Improving how a child sits when eating isn’t magically going to solve every problem for every child, but ignoring the benefits of good positioning will make most feeding problems worse.  Even problems not immediately associated with posture can become bigger problems when a child has poor postural stability at the dinner table.

What impact does posture have on a child’s mealtime experience?

  • posture affects how safely and efficiently a child can coordinate breathing and swallowing.  Lean back and turn your head way over to the side, then try to swallow your saliva.  Imagine if you could not bring your head to the center and tilt your chin a little so that every part is aligned and fully operational.  Then imagine that you have a mouthful of food.  Scary.  Imagine if you persistently moved your head because you are a sensory seeker and you find sitting still and balanced unsettlingly dull.  You only feel awake and happy when moving.  With a mouthful of food…..If the choice is breathing or eating, most of us would refuse the food and choose to breathe.  Good positioning can prevent a child from having to make a choice.
  • posture impacts how easily a child can pay attention, stay calm, and behave in an organized manner through the whole meal.  If a child is uncomfortable, unbalanced, or trying to find a stable and comfortable position, he is not paying attention to the taste/texture of the food.  He doesn’t know exactly where it is located in the path from his lips to the back of his mouth for swallowing.  His own involuntary movements or the movements he makes to stay alert and engaged can distract him from eating well or eating at all.  He just might want to get up and leave.
  • posture affects learning and independence.  It is harder to hold a spoon, harder to hold a cup, and harder to avoid spilling or drooling when a child is not sitting in a balanced position.  Every child, no matter their issues, looks less capable and needs more time, support, or attention when they aren’t sitting well.  Children with multiple issues might decide that they really don’t care about becoming more independent.
  • posture affects the use of social and language skills.  Sitting well makes it easier to coordinate speaking, listening, and eating.  A child struggling to stay in a stable and comfortable position isn’t able to accomplish the multi-tasking demands of dinner conversation.  If social skills are an issue, sitting for meals can become a power struggle instead of an opportunity to observe and model positive interactions, then practice them with family and friends.

My parents told me to sit up straight at the dinner table. They were concerned about manners and politeness.   For a lot of kids, how they sit at the dinner table is not a deportment issue, but it makes a big difference in their mealtime experience and the overall experience of their families or classmates.