Tag Archives: low muscle tone and hypermobility

Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problem With Blankets

 

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Everyone knows that sleep is important.  Research in sleep science (yes, that is a thing) tells us that our brains are working to digest the day’s learning, the immune system is active during sleep, and our bodies are repairing and renewing tissues and organs while we slumber.  As much as we need sleep, kids need it more.  They are building the brains and bodies they will carry into their future.  Children need good quality sleep as much as they need healthy food.

Helping children to sleep well is usually a combination of creating good and consistent bedtime routines, giving them a full day of physical action and warm social interaction, and developing a healthy sleep environment.  This means providing a sleep-positive environment and removing any barriers to sleeping well.  But giving kids the chance to get a good night’s sleep can be harder when a child has hypermobility.

Some of the challenges to sleep are sensory-based, and some are orthopedic.  Here are a few things that make sleep more challenging for these kids:

  • Children with limited proprioception and kinesthesia due to low tone or excessive joint mobility can have difficulty shifting down into a quiet state for sleep.  They spend their day seeking sensory input;  not moving reduces the sensory information that makes them feel calm and organized.  To understand more about the sensory concerns of hypermobility, take a look at Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children.
  • Some hypermobile kids have joint or muscle pain that keeps them up or wakes them up.
  • Hypermobile kids can get arms and legs caught in their bedclothes or between crib slats and mattresses.  Any layer can be a potential problem, from the top sheet to the decorative afghan that Granny sent for his birthday.
  • Limbs can slide off the mattress during deep sleep and create strain on ligaments and tendons.   You and I depend on our brain to perceive an awkward position and take corrective action.  The same child who “w” sits and slides off a chair without noticing is not going to wake up when her arm is hanging off the bed during sleep, even though the tissues are stretching beyond their typical range of motion.

Here are some simple strategies that may improve your child’s sleep:

  • Try a duvet or a flannel sheet set to minimize the number of layers of bedclothes.
  • Use a rashguard suit instead of pajamas.  I am particularly fond of the zip-front style so that less force is needed to get arms in and out while dressing.  You can peel it off more easily.  The lycra creates sensory feedback that can support body awareness while keeping them cozy.  An all-in-one suit also gives a bit of support so that limbs don’t easily overstretch.  A little bit of proprioceptive input in a breathable fabric that can also generate a bit of neutral warmth (from body heat) to keep tissues from getting too stiff.
  • Avoid footie sleepers that are too short.  Too-small footie sleepers create compressive forces on joints and could even encourage spinal torque.  Hypermobile kids will be the last ones to complain since they often don’t feel discomfort right away.  My preference is not to use these sleepers at all with hypermobile kids or kids with low tone.  See the next suggestion for another reason why I feel this way.
  • Make them take off those footie sleepers when they wake up and walk around.  As fabric twists and children stand/walk on the fabric, not the soles, it creates a safety risk underfoot.  Less sensory feedback and slippery soles!!  Get them dressed once they wake up.
  • Carefully consider weighted blankets.  Originally sold for kids on the autistic spectrum and for kids with sensory processing disorders without muscle or orthopedic issues, these blankets have become popular with other groups.  The biggest concern is that placing weight (meaning force) on an unstable joint over time without conscious awareness or adult control is a safety issue.  It is possible to create ligament injury or even subluxation of a joint, depending on limb position and the amount of force placed on a joint.  Talk this one over with your OTR or PT before you order one of these blankets.
  • Consider aromatherapy, gentle massage, white noise machines, and other gentler sleep strategies to help your child sleep well.  For kids who sleep well but wake up stiff, learn how to use gentle massage and possibly heat to help them get going.
  • Try K-Taping or Hip Helpers for stability.  Kineseotape stays on for days and gives joint support and sensory input while your child sleeps.  Hip Helpers are snug lycra bike shorts that limit extreme hip abduction for the littlest kids  (legs rotate out to the sides excessively).  They gently help your child align hip joints correctly.  As with weighted blankets, I strongly recommend consulting with your therapists to learn about how to use both of these strategies.  When used incorrectly, both can create more problems for your child.

 

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Can Hypermobility Cause Speech Problems?

 

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As a pediatric OT, many of my clients have speech and feeding problems that are attributed to low muscle tone.  Very often, that is where assessment ends.  Perhaps it shouldn’t.  Joint hypermobility can create issues such as dysarthria, disfluency and poor voice control.  It isn’t only about muscles and muscle coordination.  Being able to identify all the causes of speech delays and difficulties means better treatment and better results.

I have had the privilege to know a handful of master speech pathologists whose manual evaluation skills are amazing.  These clinicians are capable of identifying joint laxity and poor tissue integrity (which contribute to injury, weakness and instability) as well as identifying low muscle tone, sensory processing issues and dyspraxia.  They can assess whole-body stability and control instead of ending their assessment at the neck.

It is more difficult to clearly differentiate low muscle tone from hypermobile joints in young children.  Assessing the youngest clients that cannot be interviewed and do not follow instructions carefully (or at all!)  is a challenge.  Many times we are forced to rely on observation and history as much as we use responses from direct interaction with a child.  In truth, laxity and low tone often co-exist.  Lax joints create overstretched or poorly aligned muscles that don’t contract effectively.  Low muscle tone doesn’t support joints effectively to achieve and maintain stability, creating a risk for overstretching ligaments and injuring both tendons and joint capsules.  A vicious cycle ensues, creating more weakness, instability and more difficulties with motor control.

Some children that are diagnosed with flaccid dysarthria, poor suck/swallow/breathe synchrony, phonological issues and poor respiratory control may be diagnosed later in life (sometimes decades later) as having Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or generalized benign joint hypermobility syndrome.   They often drop the final sounds in a word, or their voice fades away at the end of a sentence when they are younger. These kids might avoid reading or speaking front of the class when older.  This isn’t social anxiety or an attitude problem.  They are struggling to achieve and maintain the carefully graded control needed for these speech skills.

You may notice a breathy-ness to their voice that makes them sound more like their grandparents than their peers.  Children that avoid running in sports like soccer or hockey aren’t always unable to continue because they are globally fatigued or in pain.    Being unable to stabilize their trunk results in inefficient muscular recruitment and limited grading of breath.  Ask any runner or singer and they will tell you what that means: game over.

If your child is struggling with these issues and isn’t receiving speech therapy, now may be the time to explore it.  You and your child may be relieved to learn that there is effective therapy out there!

Looking for more information on hypermobility?   Take a look at Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior and Hypermobile Child? Simple Dental Moves That Make a Real Difference in Your Child’s Health for more strategies to improve daily life!

Is your child struggling with toilet training?  I wrote an e-book for you!  The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Tone is available on Amazon and Your Therapy Source.  I looked far and wide for resources to help the families I work with as an OT.  There wasn’t anything out there that explained why kids and parents find this skill so hard to achieve, so I had to do something to help the situation!  Read more about my book here: The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!