Tag Archives: joint pain

The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem

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In adult rehab, occupational therapists are regularly providing patients who have incoordination, muscle weakness or joint instability with both skill-building activities and adaptive equipment such as Dycem.  In pediatrics, you see a predominance of skills training.  Adaptive equipment shows up primarily for the most globally and pervasively disabled children.  I think that should change. Why?  Because frustration is an impediment to learning, and adaptive equipment can be like training wheels; you can take them off as skills develop.  When kids aren’t constantly frustrated, they are excited to try harder and feel supported by adults, not aggravated.

 

What Dycem Can Do For Your Child

Dycem isn’t a new product, but you hardly ever see it suggested to kids with mild to moderate motor incoordination, low tone, sensory processing disorders, hypermobility, and dyspraxia.  We let these kids struggle as their cereal bowl spills and their crayons roll away from them.  Dycem matting is a great tool for these kids.  It is grippy on both sides, but it is easy to clean.  Place a terrific bowl or plate on it OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues, and it won’t tip over with gentle pressure, and not even if the surface has a slight incline.  It lasts a long time, and can be cut into any shape needed for a booster seat tray or under the base of a toy like a dollhouse or a toy garage.  Placing a piece of Dycem under your child while they are sitting on a tripp trap chair or a cube chair A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato ChairThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat! will help them keep their pelvis stable while they eat and play.  The bright color contrasts with most objects, supporting kids with visual deficits and poor visual perceptual skills.  It catches their eye and their attention.  As you can see, Dycem has a lot to offer children and parents.

How To Use Dycem To Build Motor Skills

Will it prevent all spills or falls?  No.  But it will decrease the constant failures that cause children to give up and request your help, or cause them to refuse to continue trying.  Children are creating their self-image earlier than you realize, so helping them see themselves as competent is essential.  Will it teach kids not to use their non-dominant hand to stabilize objects?  Not if an adult uses it correctly.  Introducing Dycem at the appropriate stage in motor development and varying when and where it is used is the key.  Children need lots of different types of situations in order to develop bilateral control, and as long as they are given a wide variety of opportunities, offering them adaptive equipment during key activities isn’t going to slow them down.  It will show them that we are supporting them on their journey.  When kids are new to an activity or a skill and need repeated successes to keep trying, Dycem can help them persevere.  When children are moving to the next level of skill and see that they are struggling more, Dycem can support them until they master this new level.

The Cheap Hack:  Silicone Mats

I will often recommend the use of silicone baking mats instead of dycem.  These inexpensive mats often do the job at a lower cost, and can be easily replaced if lost at daycare or school.  Dycem is a specialty item that can be purchased online but not in most stores.  Silicone mats aren’t as grippy, but they are easily washed and dried.  Some families are averse to anything that looks like adaptive equipment, so I may introduce these mats first to build a parent’s confidence in my recommendations.

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Is Your Hypermobile Child JointSmart?

Sometimes it must seem that OTs and PTs are the ultimate buzz killers. “Don’t do gymnastics; it could damage your knees” and “I don’t recommend those shoes. Not enough support”. Just like the financial planner that tells you to sell the boat and save more for a rainy day, we therapists can sound like we are trying to crush dreams and scare families.

Nothing could be further from the truth! Our greatest wish is to see all children live their lives with joy, not pain and restriction. Hypermobile children that grow up understanding their body’s unique issues and know how to live with hypermobility are “joint smart” kids. The kids who force their bodies to do things that cause injury or insist on doing things they simply cannot accomplish face two kinds of pain; physical pain, and a feeling that they are failing for reasons they cannot fathom.

Pain at a Young Age?
Very young children with hypermobility don’t usually see OTs and PTs for pain, unless they have JRA or MD. The thing that sends them to therapy initially is their lack of stability. Some impressively hypermobile kids won’t have pain until they are in middle age. Pain (at any age) usually results from damage to the ligaments, tendons and occasionally the joints themselves. When the supporting tissues of a joint are too loose, a joint can dislocate or sublux (partial dislocation). This is often both painful and way too frequent for hypermobile kids. Strains and sprains are very common, and they happen from seemingly innocuous events. Other tissues may bruise easily as well, creating more pain. Disorders such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome can affect skin and vessel integrity as well as joint tissue, so it is not uncommon to see bruising “for no reason” or larger bruises than you would expect from daily activity.

Becoming JointSmart Starts With Parents
So…does your child even understand that they are hypermobile? If they are under 8, almost certainly not. Do they know that they have issues with being unstable? Probably. They may have been labeled “clumsy” or “wobbly”, even weak. Labels are easy to give and hard to avoid. I suggest that parents reframe these labels and try to take the negative sting out of them. Pointing out that people come in an amazing variety of shapes and abilities is helpful, but the most important thing a parent can do is to understand the mechanics, the treatment and how to move and live with hypermobility. Then parents can frame their child’s issues as challenges that can be dealt with, not deficits that have cursed them. How a parent responds to a child’s struggles and complaints is key, absolutely key.

The first step is teaching yourself about hypermobility and believing that options exist for your child. Ask your therapists any questions you have, even the ones you are afraid to ask, and make sure that your therapist has a positive, life-affirming perspective. Most of us do, but if you are at all anxious or worried, it really helps to hear about what can be done, not just what activities and choices are off the table. If you blame yourself for your child’s hypermobility, get support for yourself so that your child doesn’t feel that they are burdening you. They don’t need that kind of baggage on this journey.

Even when we are optimistic and creative as therapists, it doesn’t mean that we won’t tell you our specific concerns about gymnastics and Crocs for children with hypermobility. We will. It would be unprofessional not to. But we want you and your child to develop the ability to understand your options, including the benefits and the drawbacks of those options, and give you the freedom to make conscious choices.

Now that is being smart!