Tag Archives: interoception

Is Your Child With Low Tone “Too Busy” to Make it to the Potty?

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Since writing my first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I have fielded a ton of questions about the later stages of potty training.  One stumbling block for most children appears to be “potty fatigue”.  They lose the early excitement of mastery, and they get wrapped up in whatever they are doing.  What happens when you combine the effects of low tone with the inability of a  young child to judge the consequences of delaying a bathroom run?  This can lead to delaying a visit to the bathroom until it is too late.  Oops.

Kids with low tone often have poor interoceptive processing.  What is that?  Well, interoception is how you perceive internal sensory information.  When it comes to toileting, you feel fullness in your bladder that presses on your abdominal wall, in the same way you feel a full stomach.  This is how any of us know that we have to “go”.  If you wait too long, pressure turns to a bit of pain.  Low muscle tone creates a situation in which the stretch receptors in the abdominal muscles and in the bladder wall itself don’t get triggered until there is a stronger stimulus.  There may be some difficulty in locating the source of pressure as coming from the bladder instead of bowel, or even feeling like it could be coming from their back or stomach.  This leads to bathroom accidents if the toilet is too far away,  if they can’t walk fast enough, or if they cannot pull down their pants fast enough.  You have to work on all those skills!

Add in a child’s unwillingness to recognize the importance of the weak sensory signals that he or she is receiving because they are having too much fun or are waiting for a turn in a game or on a swing.  Uh-oh.  Not being able to connect the dots is common in young children.  That is why we don’t let them cross a busy street alone until they are well over 3 or 4.  They are terrible at judging risk.  Again, this means there are skills to develop to avoid accidents.

What should parents do to help their children limit accidents arising from being “too busy to pee?”

  1. Involve kids in the process of planning and deciding.  A child that is brought to the potty without any explanations such as “I can see you wiggling and crossing your legs.  That tells me that you are ready to pee” isn’t being taught how to recognize more of their own signs of needing the potty.
  2. Allow kids to experience the consequences of poor choices.  If they refused to use the potty and had an accident, they can end up in the tub to wash up, put their wet clothes in the washer, and if they were watching a show, it is now over.  They don’t get to keep watching TV while an adult wipes them, changes them, and cleans up the mess!
  3. Create good routines.  Early.  Just as your mom insisted that you use the bathroom before leaving the house, kids with low tone need to understand that for them, there is a cost to overstretching their bladder by “holding it”  Read  Teach Kids With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In! to learn more about this.  The best strategy is to encourage a child to urinate before their bladder is too full, make potty routines a habit very early in life, and to develop the skills of patience stretching Stretch Your Toddler’s Patience, Starting Today!  from an early age.  Creating more patience in young children allows them to think clearly and plan better, within their expected cognitive level.

Looking for more information on managing daily life with your special needs child?

I wrote three e-books for you!

My e-book on toilet training, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, and my e-books on managing pediatric hypermobility, are available on Amazon as read-only downloads, and on Your Therapy Source as printable downloads.  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume   One:  The Early Years and Volume Two:  The School Years are filled with strategies that parents and therapists can use immediately to improve a child’s independence and safety.

Your Therapy Source has bundled my books together for a great value.  On their site, you can buy both the toilet training and the Early Years books together, or buy both hypermobility books together at a significant discount!

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Binaural Beats and Regulation: More Than Music Therapy

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When you have so much to choose from, how do you pick the right one?

Binaural beat technology isn’t new.  But it is powerful.  This post is designed to answer some questions about how it works, why it works, and how I use it effectively in the treatment of sensory processing issues.

For people who have read about or tried Quickshifts  Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about listening on headphones versus speakers, and why the music has that echo-y tone.

The use of binaural headphones or speakers placed close to the child allows the ears to hear the full range of sound with as little interference or absorption from the environment.  It is important that the left and right ear are hearing the sounds separately.  The echo-y sound?  What you are hearing is the BBT; binaural beat technology.  The slight alteration in sound frequency between what the brain hears from the left and right speakers forces the brain to synch up at a frequency that matches this level of difference.

BBT isn’t new.  BBT has been used and researched since the 70’s.  It is out there in many forms; you can even find recorded BBT music on YouTube.  There are enough studies done to prove that this technology has real effects on alertness, attention and mood.  It makes sense that therapists would like to use it to help kids with self-regulation issues.  BBT is helpful for learning and self-regulation, but only if you know what brainwave state you want, and why you want it.  And that is where skilled therapists can help.

But which one to use?

 I only use Quickshifts in my therapy sessions.

 

Why do I prefer Quickshifts to deliver BBT?

  • Quickshifts entrain an alpha brainwave state.  This state is associated with calm focus the ability to move to a more powerful focus or downshift into sleep, and, wait for it, interoception.  Yup, the biggest new word in occupational therapy is interoception, and there are some excellent studies done by neuropsych researchers that indicate that alpha brainwave states increase interoception.  Yeah!  Interoception is the ability to perceive internal states, and this includes basic physiological states such as fatigue, hunger, and the need to eliminate.  So many of our clients struggle with knowing what they feel.  Quickshifts can help.
  • Alpha brainwave states are theorized to act as a gating mechanism for anxiety, which means they help kids block anxiety.  Anxiety isn’t a great state for kids with ASD, SPD, or any of us.  Anxiety is a component of so many diagnoses, and it isn’t easy to do cognitive behavioral strategies like CBT or DBT with children under 10 or 11.  Quickshifts also work well for adults with anxiety as well! Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?
  • The music used in Quickshifts is very carefully designed to enhance specific functional states, and every occupational therapist is all about functional performance.  We don’t want just relaxation; we want engagement in life.  The way that Quickshifts uses music allows BBT to address specific behavioral performance abilities.  There are albums for attention, for movement, and for regulation.  They all use BBT.  For each particular album, one functional goal will predominate.  I don’t need to induce a meditative state in a child that is working on handwriting.  I need calm focus and better movement control.
  • The avoidance of pure tones means I don’t have to worry about seizure activity in kids with a seizure disorder.  The use of pure tones is a risk for seizures, so if a child has frequent seizures, I can be confident that I am not increasing them with this treatment.
  • The choice of instrumentation on Quickshifts albums is often more grounding than other BBT choices.  I want kids to feel grounded, not floating on a cloud.  That state makes it harder to pay attention, to speak, move, etc.  Being jolted into a high level of engagement without grounding isn’t great either.  Remember:  OT is all about functioning.  This happens at that “just right” point of arousal.
  • There is a progression of instrumentation and rhythm on many Quickshift albums that guides the brain into more environmental awareness and postural activation, but it is done gently.   Getting to an alpha state is a goal, but improving functional performance with less risk of overload is most important to me.  I have to give kids the ability to leave our session in a great state of mind.
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He picked out his perfect pumpkin!

For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up

 

photo-1453342664588-b702c83fc822For children with either low muscle tone or spasticity, toilet training can be a real challenge.  If it isn’t clothing management or making it to the potty on time, they can have a hard time perceiving that NOW is the time to start heading to the toilet.

Why?  Often, their interoception isn’t terrific.  What is interoception?  Think of it like proprioception, but internal.  It’s the ability to identify and interpret sensory information coming from organs and internal tissues.  Among them, the pressure of a full bladder or a full colon.  If you can’t feel and interpret sensation correctly, your only clue that you need the potty is when your pants are soiled.  Uh-oh.  A child with muscle tone issues is almost certainly going to have sensory issues.  Tone will affect the amount and quality of sensory feedback from their body.

What can you do to help kids?  The simplest, and the fastest solution I have found, is to tell them to stand up and see if they have changed their mind.  Why?  Because in a sitting position, the force of a full bladder or colon on the abdominal wall and the pelvic floor isn’t as intense.  Gravity and intra-abdominal pressure increase those sensations in standing.  More sensation can lead to more awareness.

So the next time your child tells you they don’t have to “go”, ask them to stand up and reconsider their opinion.  Now, if they are trying to watch a show or play a game, you aren’t going to get very far.  So make sure that they don’t have any competition for their attention!

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Well, I wrote the (e) book!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone gives you readiness checklists and ways to make readiness actually happen.  It has strategies you can use today to start making progress, regardless of your child’s level of communication and mobility.  Learn what occupational therapists know about how to teach this essential skill!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, on Amazon and on a terrific site for therapists and parents Your Therapy Source.  Read more about my unique book:The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Teach Kids With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In!

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People who have read my blog are aware that I wrote a book on toilet training, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone. The issue of kids who “hold it in” didn’t make it into the book, but perhaps it should have. Children that have problems with muscle tone or connective tissue integrity (or both) risk current and future issues with incontinence and UITs if they overstretch their bladder or bowel too far. We teach little girls to wipe front-to-back to prevent UTIs. We need to teach all children to avoid “holding it in” in the same manner that we discourage them from w-sitting.

I am specifically speaking here about kids with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Down Syndrome and all the other conditions that create pelvic weakness and muscle control issues. But even if your child has idiopathic low tone (meaning that there is no identified cause) this can still become a problem.

The effects of low tone and poor tissue integrity on toilet training are legion. Many of them are sensory-based, a situation that gets very little acknowledgment from pediatricians. These children simply don’t feel the pressure of their full bladder or even a full rectum with the same intensity or discomfort that other children experience. This is known as poor interoception, a sensory-based issue that is rarely discussed, even by parents and occupational therapists that are well versed in other sensory processing issues.  For more on how sensory problems affect toilet training, see Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!).   Kids that don’t accurately perceive fullness can be “camels” sometimes, holding it in with no urge to go, and have to be reminded to void. It can be more convenient for the busy child to keep playing rather than go to the bathroom, or it can save a shy child from the embarrassment of public bathrooms; she prefers to wait until she returns home to “go”.

This is not a good idea at all! The bladder is a muscle that can be overstretched in the same way the hip muscles loosen in children who “W-sit”. Don’t overstretch muscles and then expect them to work well. In addition, the ligaments that support the bladder are subject to the same sensory-based issues that affect other ligaments in the body: once stretched, they don’t bounce back. Holding urine instead of eliminating just stretches vulnerable ligaments out.  A weak pelvic floor is nothing to ignore. Ask older women who have had a few pregnancies how that is working out for them.  Read Is Your Constipated Toddler Also Having Bladder Accidents? Here Are Three Possible Reasons Why to learn why you should be connecting both types of incontinence and taking action sooner rather than later.

For children with connective tissue disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, another comorbidity (commonly occurring disorder) is interstitial cystitis (IC).  What does that feel like? The pain of a bad urinary tract infection without any bacterial infection.  Anything that irritates the walls of the bladder adds stress to tissue.  Regular elimination cannot prevent IC, but good bladder care could minimize problems.  Not holding it in is part of good bladder care.

The stretch receptors in both the abdominal wall and in the bladder wall that should be telling a child with low tone that it is time to tinkle just don’t get enough stretch stimulation to do so when they have been extended too far.

When should you teach a child not to hold it in?  Right from the start.  The time to prevent problems is when a child is developing toileting habits, not when problems have developed.  One way to encourage children to use the bathroom is to make it optimally accessible.  Read Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child? and see if this affordable potty will help your child feel confident and independent right away!

So….an essential part of toileting education for children is when to head to the bathroom. If your child has low muscle tone or a connective tissue disorder that creates less sensory-based information for them, the easiest solution is a routine or a schedule. They use the bathroom whether they feel they need to or not. The older ones can notice how much they are voiding, and that tells them that they really did need to “go”.   The little ones can be rewarded for good listening.

Understanding that the kidneys will fill up a child’s bladder after a large drink in about 35-45 minutes is helpful. But it can always be the right time to hit the bathroom shortly after a meal, before leaving the house, or when returning home. As long as it is routine and relatively frequent, it may not matter how a toileting schedule is created. Just make sure that as they grow up, they are told why this is important. A continent child may not believe that this is preventing accidents, but a child who has a history of embarrassing accidents in public may be your best student.

Many kids with hypermobility have bedwetting issues long after most kids are continent at night.  It helps to explain to them why this may be an issue for them.  Without that discussion, kids often assume that there is something inherently wrong with them as people.  Don’t let your child’s self-esteem drop because they don’t understand why this is such a hard thing to accomplish.  Understanding also makes them more willing to follow a toileting schedule or to focus on developing interoceptive awareness.  If you are wondering if your child’s hypermobility has emotional and behavioral impact, read How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Regulation in Children and Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior .

For little girls who are at a higher risk of UTIs, I tell parents to teach wiping after urination as a “pat-pat” rather than the standard recommendation of front-to-back wiping.  Why?  Because children aren’t really good at remember that awkward movement, and even if you are standing right their reminding her, she may just wipe back-to-front because that is easier and more natural.  “Pat-pat” is an easy movement and reduces her risk of fecal contamination.  I cannot tell you I have done hard research on this strategy reducing infections, but then, I have common sense.  This is the smarter way for her to wipe.  Want more info on wiping?  Check out How To Teach Your Toddler To Wipe “Back There”

Maybe you have the opposite problem; a child who doesn’t know that they need to head to the bathroom until the last moment.  Read For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up for a simple strategy to increase sensory awareness and help them connect the dots in time to make it to the potty!

The good news in all of this? Perceiving sensory feedback can be improved. There are higher-tech solutions like biofeedback, but children can also become more aware without tech. There are physical therapists that work on pelvic and core control, but some children will also do well with junior Kegel practice and education and building awareness of the internal sensations of fullness and urgency.  Many occupational therapists use the Wilbarger Protocol for general proprioceptive awareness.  If your child has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, please read Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? for information on how to use this treatment technique wisely.

Looking for more toilet training information?

My e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, has readiness checklists that help you decide what skills to work on right away, and detailed strategies for every stage of training.  I want children to become independent and confident, and for parents to feel good about their role in guiding kids to develop this important life skill.

If you are interested in purchasing The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, please visit my website, tranquil babies and click on “e-book” at the top ribbon. You can also buy it on Amazon and your therapy source

Need more than toilet training help?

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years and Volume Two:  The School Years are finally available!  These e-books help parents with all the self-care challenges, helps them figure out the right chairs, bikes, sports and even pencils, and learn the easiest way to teach their child to get dressed and stay safe on the playground.  Both books are packed with strategies that help kids and therapists as well, plus checklists to improve communication within the family, with teachers, and even with a child’s doctors.  Both books are unique resources that empower parents and inform therapists!  Read more about Volume One here: The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today! and Volume Two here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!  .

You can find the digital downloads on Amazon.com and don’t worry if you don’t have a Kindle; Amazon has a simple way to load them onto your iPhone or iPad!