Tag Archives: hypotonia

A Fun Way to Help Kids With Low Tone Stand Up Straight: Stomp-Stomp!

sven-brandsma-gn-I07tTixw-unsplashKids with hypermobility or low tone are often found standing in the most dysfunctional of positions.  Toes pointing in, feet rolled in or out, feet on top of each other: take your pick, because these kids will alternate between these wobbly choices and more!  Read How To Improve Posture In Children With Low Muscle Tone… Without a Fight! and How To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” for some other ideas.  But if you want a quick idea that works to help a child stand up with better control and stability, read on.

Telling a child to “fix your feet” often makes no sense to them, or gets ignored.  Passively repositioning their feet doesn’t teach them anything, and can annoy children who feel that they are being manhandled.

What Can You Do?

Tell Them To “Stomp-Stomp”!

Have the child stomp their feet. Repeat if necessary (or because they want to).   It is simple, you can demonstrate it easily, and most kids grin happily and eagerly copy you.  It is fun to stomp your feet.  It also give kids a chance to move in place, which they often need when socially distancing in a classroom.

 

Why Does It Work?

Because in order to stomp their feet, they have to bring their attention to their feet, shift their weight from one foot to the other in order to lift them up, and their feet almost always end up placed in a more aligned position after stomping.

Many of the goal boxes their PT and your OT have on their list are checked.  Kids don’t feel controlled or criticized.  They are having fun.  Sensory input happens in a fun way, not as an exercise.

Want more help with your child, or help improving treatment plans as a therapist?

I wrote three e-books for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, and the JointSmart Child series on hypermobility are all valuable resources for parents and therapists.  I wrote them because there is simply nothing out there that provides an explanation for why these symptoms make life so difficult for kids (and parents, and teachers, and even therapists!) and what can be done to make everyday life better.

Learn why low tone and hypermobility both create sensory processing issues, and what kinds of social and emotional issues are understood to accompany hypotonia and hypermobility.  When parents see these issues as complex rather than only about strength and stability, they start to feel more empowered and more positive.

Read more about these books, available for purchase on Amazon and Your Therapy Source,  in A Practical Guide to Helping the Hypermobile School-Age Child Succeed, and The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today! as well as The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection Strategies

I spent almost 10 years working in adult rehab before I transitioned to pediatrics.  I still teach joint protection, but I teach it differently.  Kids rarely have JRA or joint damage in general.  What they have in spades are serious degrees of hypermobility.  And the methods to use joint protection strategies so that tissue damage is minimized are different:

Joint protection strategies for hypermobility need to be adapted from those for other disorders, in order to obtain the best results and put clients at low risk of accidental injury.

What’s So Different?

  • Hypermobility can create a different type of joint strain than OA or other joint damage, and different types of soft tissue damage.  Understanding the way placing force on hypermobile joints can damage them is essential to understanding how to guide clients correctly.
  • Excess mobility reduces sensory feedback even when pain isn’t a factor, and can create different types of pain that aren’t as common as in RA, OA, or other joint deformities.  I laugh a little bit , and then groan, when I see articles on proprioceptive loss in hypermobility that focus on only lower extremities.  There are a whole bunch of joints above the waist, guys, and hypermobility affects each and every one of them as well.  Just because you aren’t using them to walk doesn’t mean you don’t need proprioception to use them…..!  I wonder who thinks this is just a lower extremity issue?
  • Hypermobility appears to cause dyspraxia that can “disappear” after a few repetitions, only to reappear after a while or with a new activity.  How can that be?  It can’t.  Praxis doesn’t work like that.  What you are seeing is a lack of sensory feedback that improves with repetition, only to be replaced with a lack of skilled movement from fatigue, or from overuse of force, or pain.  This is really poorly understood by patients, and even by some therapists, but makes perfect sense when fully explored.
  • Hypermobility is seen in a wide range of clients, including younger, more active people who are trying to accomplish skills that are less common in the over-60’s set that we see for OA.  Different goals lead to different needs for joint protection strategies and solutions.
  • Joint damage isn’t evident until long after ligament damage has been done.  People with hypermobility at every age need to protect ligaments, not just joint surfaces.  This isn’t always explained.
  • Their “normal” was never all that normal.  Folks with RA and OA often have years, even decades, of pain-free life to draw on for motor control.  Hypermobility that has been with a person for their entire life deprives them of any memory of what safe, pain-free movement, should feel like.  They are moving “blind” to a degree.  Incorporate this fact into your treatment.
  • So many people are hypermobile in multiple joints that the simple old saws  like “lift with your legs, not your back”  won’t cut it.  Whatever you learned in your CEU course on arthritis won’t be exactly right. Think out of the box.
  • The reasons for hypermobility have to be accounted for.  Genetic disorders like PWS, Down syndrome, and Heritable Disorders of connective Tissue (HDCTs) bring with them other issues like poor skin integrity and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.  Always learn about these before you provide guidance, or you risk harm.  We therapists are in the “do no harm” business, remember?

 

This fall I may start writing a workbook on addressing the use of joint protection, energy conservation, pacing and task adaptation for hypermobility.  There is certainly nothing out there currently that is useful for either therapists or patients.

in the meantime, please read Need a Desk Chair for Your Hypermobile School-Age Child? Check out the Giantex Chair , Hypermobility and Music Lessons: How to Reduce the Pain of Playing and Why Injuries to Hypermobile Joints Hurt Twice

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Better…unless that shoulder and elbow are as hypermobile as that wrist and those MCPs!

Toilet Training? Your Child Needs the Right Shorts!

 

In my first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I wrote almost a full chapter just on clothing management.  If your child needs you to pull clothing on and off, they are NOT fully trained.  And if they have clothes that make it impossible for them to manage, you are holding them back from feeling like a real success.

Target has your back!

Yes, the same place you go for their swimsuits, toilet paper, and hand soap.  Target sells a cheap pair of shorts that children can easily pull down and back up again.  Their Cat and Jack line is pretty inexpensive, which is helpful when you know that you will be going through a few pair of shorts per day due to accidents.  They are soft to the touch for kids with sensory sensitivities, and they do have a drawstring waist if you have one of those kids whose shorts slide off their tush.  But remember that if you knot it, your kid won’t be able to slide their shorts off easily.  Better to buy a smaller size.

I would pair these with a T-shirt that ends close to their natural waist.  A longer top will get in the way during bathroom use.  You want to give your child every chance to have a positive experience, and peeing on your clothing by accident isn’t a positive!

Here is a link to a post on dressing skills: Low Muscle Tone and Dressing: Easy Solutions to Teach Independence

Want more help with your child?  

The Practical Guide….. is available on my website Tranquil Babies as a printable download, and on Amazon as a read-only download.  It is also available on Your Therapy Source individually and bundled with either my book on hypermobility in very young children The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today! or as a discounted super-bundle with my book on hypermobility in school-age children included A Practical Guide to Helping the Hypermobile School-Age Child Succeed

Helping Children With Low Muscle Tone Manage Summertime Heat

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I write a version of this post every summer.  Puzzled parents ask me about their child’s sometimes dramatic reactions to playing outside in the heat.  Kids are melting like popsicles, tripping and whining.  Time to explain the way low tone and heat interact to create less safety, less stability, and less cooperation.

Yup, low tone has behavioral consequences.  How to comprehend and manage it is one of the cornerstones of my first book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  When parents understand that low muscle tone is more than a motor issue, things start to improve.

Heat has predictable effects on muscles.  That is why people use heating pads on muscle spasms.  But when a child has low tone, heat isn’t helpful.  It makes it even harder to initiate and maintain a muscle contraction.  Ambient heat and internal body heat combine to create problems for kids.

What does a child with low muscle tone look like when they spend time in a very warm environment?

  • They fatigue more rapidly.  They could walk to the ice cream stand but want to be carried back.
  • They feel uncomfortable, but in a way that isn’t “sick”.  It is a combination of sluggish and unsteady.  The younger the child, the less they can express the difference between how they felt inside in the A/C and how they feel outside.
  • They become more stubborn, more contrary, or simply more irritable.  This can happen even if a child is typically the most even-tempered of kids.  Add humidity?  You might be in for a real rollercoaster ride.
  • They are often significantly less safe when they move.  They can have just enough of a delay in their ability to catch themselves when they fall, or fail to place their foot in the right spot climbing a stair.  They can even slide off the chair they are sitting on!

What can parents do?

  • Plan active fun for the cooler times of the day, or at least do active play in the shade.

  • Dress your child in breathable clothing, perhaps even tech clothes with breathable panels or special fabrics.

  • Dress them lightly and in light-colored clothing.

  • Make sure that they are well hydrated at all times.

  • Offer healthy popsicles and cool drinks frequently.

  • Have a cool place to bring your child, so that they can literally “chill out”.

  • Teach them about the effects of heat on low muscle tone so that they can understand and eventually act independently.

Looking for more information on helping children manage low tone?  

I wrote more posts for you to read: Is Your Child With Low Tone “Too Busy” to Make it to the Potty? ,  One Fun Way to Help Kids With Hypotonia Align Their Feet: Stomp-Stomp!  and How To Improve Posture In Children With Low Muscle Tone… Without a Fight!

Need more information?  I wrote three e-books for you!

Look on Amazon.com and Your Therapy Source.com for The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone,  and both volumes of The JointSmart Child.  Read more about these unique (and very practical) books here:   A Practical Guide to Helping the Hypermobile School-Age Child Succeed and The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

 

Is Your Child With Low Tone “Too Busy” to Make it to the Potty?

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Since writing my first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I have fielded a ton of questions about the later stages of potty training.  One stumbling block for most children appears to be “potty fatigue”.  They lose the early excitement of mastery, and they get wrapped up in whatever they are doing.  What happens when you combine the effects of low tone with the inability of a  young child to judge the consequences of delaying a bathroom run?  This can lead to delaying a visit to the bathroom until it is too late.  Oops.

Kids with low tone often have poor interoceptive processing.  What is that?  Well, interoception is how you perceive internal sensory information.  When it comes to toileting, you feel fullness in your bladder that presses on your abdominal wall, in the same way you feel a full stomach.  This is how any of us know that we have to “go”.  If you wait too long, pressure turns to a bit of pain.  Low muscle tone creates a situation in which the stretch receptors in the abdominal muscles and in the bladder wall itself don’t get triggered until there is a stronger stimulus.  There may be some difficulty in locating the source of pressure as coming from the bladder instead of bowel, or even feeling like it could be coming from their back or stomach.  This leads to bathroom accidents if the toilet is too far away,  if they can’t walk fast enough, or if they cannot pull down their pants fast enough.  You have to work on all those skills!

Add in a child’s unwillingness to recognize the importance of the weak sensory signals that he or she is receiving because they are having too much fun or are waiting for a turn in a game or on a swing.  Uh-oh.  Not being able to connect the dots is common in young children.  That is why we don’t let them cross a busy street alone until they are well over 3 or 4.  They are terrible at judging risk.  Again, this means there are skills to develop to avoid accidents.

What should parents do to help their children limit accidents arising from being “too busy to pee?”

  1. Involve kids in the process of planning and deciding.  A child that is brought to the potty without any explanations such as “I can see you wiggling and crossing your legs.  That tells me that you are ready to pee” isn’t being taught how to recognize more of their own signs of needing the potty.
  2. Allow kids to experience the consequences of poor choices.  If they refused to use the potty and had an accident, they can end up in the tub to wash up, put their wet clothes in the washer, and if they were watching a show, it is now over.  They don’t get to keep watching TV while an adult wipes them, changes them, and cleans up the mess!
  3. Create good routines.  Early.  Just as your mom insisted that you use the bathroom before leaving the house, kids with low tone need to understand that for them, there is a cost to overstretching their bladder by “holding it”  Read  Teach Kids With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In! to learn more about this.  The best strategy is to encourage a child to urinate before their bladder is too full, make potty routines a habit very early in life, and to develop the skills of patience stretching Stretch Your Toddler’s Patience, Starting Today!  from an early age.  Creating more patience in young children allows them to think clearly and plan better, within their expected cognitive level.

Looking for more information on managing daily life with your special needs child?

I wrote three e-books for you!

My e-book on toilet training, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, and my e-books on managing pediatric hypermobility, are available on Amazon as read-only downloads, and on Your Therapy Source as printable downloads.  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume   One:  The Early Years and Volume Two:  The School Years are filled with strategies that parents and therapists can use immediately to improve a child’s independence and safety.

Your Therapy Source has bundled my books together for a great value.  On their site, you can buy both the toilet training and the Early Years books together, or buy both hypermobility books together at a significant discount!

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How To Improve Posture In Children With Low Muscle Tone… Without a Fight!

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With pediatric occupational therapy going on at home using parents as surrogate therapists, it isn’t helpful to ask a parent to do too much repositioning of children with low tone.  First of all, kids don’t like it.  Second, kids really don’t like it.

I have never met a child that enjoys therapeutic handling, no matter how skilled I am, and I don’t think I ever will.  They don’t know why we are placing their hands or legs somewhere, and they tend not to like to be told what to do and how to do it.  The best you can hope for at times is that they tolerate it and learn that therapists are going to be helping them do what they want to do For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

Leaving a child in an awkward and unstable position isn’t the right choice either.  They are going to struggle more and fail more when out of alignment and unsteady.  If you know this is going to happen, you can’t let them stay that way because you also know that this will blow back in your face in the form of frustration, short attention span, and children developing a sense that whatever they are doing or whomever they are doing it with is a drag.  A real drag.

So how can you improve the posture of a child with low tone without forcing them physically into a better position?

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Potty Training in the COVID-19 Age

 

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Parents are staying home with their toddlers and preschoolers now.  All day.  While this can be a challenge, it can also be the right time to do potty training.

Here’s how to make it work when you want to teach your toddler how to “make” in the potty:

  1. You don’t have to wait for readiness.  What you might get instead is a child that has lost the excitement of being praised by adults, and fears failure more than seeks praise or rewards.  If that sounds like your child,  quickly read Waiting for Toilet Training Readiness? Create It Instead!
  2. Have good equipment.  If you don’t have a potty seat that fits your child or a toilet insert and a footstool that is stable and safe, now is the time to go online shopping for one.  Without good equipment, you are already in trouble.  Children should be able to get on and off easily and not be fearful of falling off the toilet.  If you are training a preschooler and not a toddler, you really need good equipment.  They are bigger and move faster.  Safety and confidence go hand in hand.
  3. Have a plan for praise and rewards.  Not every child will want a tiny candy, but nobody should expect a new toy for every time they pee in the potty.  Know your kid and know what gets them to try a new skill.  Some children don’t do well with effusive praise Sensitive Child? Be Careful How You Deliver Praise , so don’t go over the top if this is your kid.
  4. Know how to set things up for success.  If your child is typically-developing, get Oh Crap Potty Training by Jamie Glowacki, because she is the best person to tell you how to help you be successful.  She even has a chapter just on poop!  If your child has hypotonia or hypermobility, consider my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  It is inexpensive, available on Amazon and Your Therapy Source, and gives you checklists and explanations for why you need to think out-of-the-box to potty train these kids.  You don’t leave for vacation without a map.  Don’t wing this.  Just don’t.
  5. Build your ability to calm yourself first.  Exactly like on an airplane, (remember them?  We will get back on them eventually) you need to calm yourself down in the face of refusals, accidents and tantrums.  You are no good to anyone if you are upset.  Read Stress Relief in the Time of Coronavirus: Enter Quickshifts and Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts? for some ideas.

Looking for more information on potty training?  I wrote an e-book for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone was my first e-book.  It is still my best seller.  There is a reason:  it helps parents and kids succeed.  This unique book explains why learning this skill is so tricky, and it gives parents and therapists detailed strategies to set kids (and parents) up for success!  Understanding that the sensory and social-emotional impacts of low muscle tone are contributing to potty training deals is crucial to making this skill easier to learn.  I include a readiness guide, strategies to pick the best equipment and clothes (yes, you can dress them so that they struggle more!), and how to move from the potty seat onto the adult toilet.

It is available on Amazon and on Your Therapy Source, a great site for materials for therapists as well as parents looking for homeschooling ideas.

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Joint Protection And Hypermobility: Investing in Your Child’s Future

 

allen-taylor-dAMvcGb8Vog-unsplash.jpgParents of hypermobile kids are taught early on not to pull on limbs while dressing them or picking them up.  It is less common to teach children how to protect their own joints.

In fact, parents may be encouraged by their child’s doctors to let them be “as active as they want to be, in order to build their strength”.  Without adding in education about  good joint protection, this is not good advice.  This post is an attempt to fill in the space between “don’t pull on their limbs” and “get them to be more active”.

Why?  Because hypermobile joints are more vulnerable to immediate injury and also to progressive damage over time.  Once joint surfaces are damaged, and tendons and ligaments are overstretched, there are very few treatments that can repair those situations.  Since young children often do not experience pain with poor joint stability, teaching good habits early is essential.  It is always preferable to prevent damage and injuries rather than have to repair damage.  Always.  And it is not as complicated as it sounds.

The basic principles of joint protection are simple.  It is the application that can become complex.  The more joints involved in a movement or that have pre-existing pain or damage, the more complex the solution.  That is why some children need to be seen by an occupational or physical therapist for guidance.  We are trained in the assessment and prescription of strategies based on clinical information, not after taking a weekend course or after reading a book.  Because hypermobile joint issues can be different from arthritic joints, read Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection Strategies  and understand the principles below that apply to almost everyone:

Some of the basics of joint protection are:

  • Joints should be positioned in anatomical alignment while at rest and as much as possible, while in use.  Knowing the correct alignment doesn’t always require a therapist.  Bending a foot on it’s side isn’t correct alignment.  Placing a wrist in a straight versus an angled position is.
  • Larger joints should execute forceful movements whenever possible.  That means that pushing a heavy door open with an arm or the side of your body is better joint protection than flattening your hand on it.  The exception is if there is damage to those larger structures.  See below.
  • Placing a joint in mid-range while moving protects joint structures.  As an example, therapists often pad and thicken handles to place finger joints in a less clenched position and allow force to dissipate through the padding.  We discourage carrying heavy loads with arms held straight down or with one arm/hand.

Remember:  once joints are damaged, if joints are painful, or the muscles are too weak to execute a movement, activity adaptations have to be considered.  There is no benefit to straining a weak or damaged joint structure.

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The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

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My first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, was a wonderful experience to write and share.  The number of daily hits on one of my most popular blog posts  Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children helped me figure out what my next e-book topic should be: hypermobility.

Hypermobility is a symptom that affects almost every aspect of a family’s life.  Unlike autism or cerebral palsy, online resources for parents are so limited and so generic that it was obvious that what was needed was solid practical information using everyday language.  Being empowered starts with knowledge and confidence.

The result?  My new e-book:  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility.  Volume One:  The Early Years.

What makes this book unique?

  • This manual explains how and why joint instability creates challenges in the simplest tasks of everyday life.
  • The sensory and behavioral consequences of hypermobility aren’t ignored; they are fully examined, and strategies to manage them are discussed in detail.
  • Busy parents can quickly spot the chapter that answers their questions by reading the short summaries at the beginning and end of each chapter.
  • This book emphasizes practical solutions over theories and medical jargon.
  • Parents learn how to create greater safety at home and in the community.
  • The appendices are forms that parents can use to improve communication with babysitters, family, teachers and doctors.

Who should read this book?

  1. Parents of hypermobile children ages 0-6, or children functioning in this developmental range.
  2. Therapists looking for new ideas for treatment or home programs.
  3. New therapists, or therapists who are entering pediatrics from another area of practice.
  4. Special educators, and educators that have hypermobile children mainstreamed into their classroom.

Looking for a preview?  Here is a sample from Chapter Three:  Positioning and Seating:

Some Basic Principles of Positioning:

Therapists learn the basics of positioning in school, and take advanced certification courses to be able to evaluate and prescribe equipment for their clients.  Parents can learn the basics too, and I feel strongly that it is essential to impart at least some of this information to every caregiver I meet.  A child’s therapists can help parents learn to use the equipment they have and help them select new equipment for their home.  The following principle are the easiest and most important principles of positioning for parents to learn:

  • The simplest rule I teach is “If it looks bad, it probably IS bad.”  Even without knowing the principles of positioning, or knowing what to do to fix things, parents can see that their child looks awkward or unsteady.  Once they recognize that their child isn’t in a stable or aligned position, they can try to improve the situation.  If they don’t know what to do, they can ask their child’s therapist for their professional advice.
  • The visual target is to achieve symmetrical alignment: a position in which a straight line is drawn through the center of a child”s face, down thorough the center of their chest and through the center of their pelvis.  Another visual target is to see that the natural curves of the spine (based on age) are supported.  Children will move out of alignment of course, but they should start form this symmetrical position.  Good movements occurs around this centered position.
  • Good positioning allows a child a balance of support and mobility.  Adults need to provide enough support, but also want to allow as much independent movement as possible.
  • The beginning of positioning is to achieve a stable pelvis.  Without a stable pelvis, stability at the feet, shoulders and head will be more difficult to achieve.  This can be accomplished by a combination of a waist or seatbelt, a cushion, and placing a child’s feet flat on a stable surface.
  • Anticipate the effects of activity and fatigue on positioning.  A child’s posture will shift as they move around in a chair, and this will make it harder for them to maintain a stable position.
  • Once a child is positioned as well as possible, monitor and adjust their position as needed.  Children aren’t crockpots; it isn’t possible to “set it and forget it.”  A child that is leaning too far to the side or too far forward, or whose hips have slid forward toward the front of the seat, isn’t necessarily tired.  They may simple need repositioning.
  • Equipment needs can change over time, even if a child is in a therapeutic seating system.  Children row physically and develop new skills that create new positioning needs.  If a child is unable to achieve a reasonable level of postural stability, they may need adjustments or new equipment.  This isn’t a failure; positioning hypermobile children is a fluid experience.

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume One:  The Early Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon.com

It is available as a click-through and printable download  on Your Therapy Source!  

NEW:  Your Therapy Source is selling my new book along with The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone as a bundle, saving you money and giving you a complete resource for the early years!

Already bought the book?  Please share your comments and suggestions for the next two books!  Volume Two is coming out in spring 2020, and will address the challenges of raising the school-aged child, and Volume Three focuses on the tween, teen, and young adult with hypermobility!

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Have a Child With Low Tone or a Hypermobile Baby? Pay More Attention to How You Pick Your Little One Up

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Carrying and holding kids is such a natural thing to do.  But when your child has hypermobility due to low muscle tone, joint issues or a connective tissue disorder, how you accomplish these simple tasks makes a difference.  Your actions can do more than get them from one position or location to another: they can build a child’s skills, or they can increase the risk of damage by creating excessive flexibility or even accidentally injure a child’s joints.

How could something so simple be both a problem as well as an opportunity?  Because hypermobility creates two issues that have to be addressed:  Less strength and stability at vulnerable joints, and less sensory feedback regarding pain and position sense in your child.  The ligaments, tendons, muscles and joint capsule at every hypermobile joint are more likely to be damaged when excessive force is placed on them.

Knowing how much force is too much isn’t easy without some instruction from a skilled therapist.  Depending on your child to react quickly and accurately to accidental stretch or pressure by crying or pulling away isn’t a good idea.  Their excessive flexibility reduces firing of receptors deep within all of these tissues in response to excessive force.  You may have looked at your child’s shoulders or ankles and think “That looks uncomfortable.  Why isn’t she fussing?”  This is the reason.  It means that you will have to be altering your actions to reduce the risk of harm.

As I mentioned earlier, this is also an opportunity.  It is an opportunity to teach your child about safe movement and positioning, right from the start.  Even the youngest child will pick up on your emphasis on alignment, control and safety.  They are always listening and learning from you every day, so incorporate effective movement into your handling and help your child build awareness and independence today!

Here are some strategies for you and your child:

  1. Always spread the force of your grasp over their body, and place your hands on the most stable locations, not the most flexible.  Lift a child through their trunk, not by holding their arms.  If they cannot steady their head, support it while you lift.  If you feel those little bones in their wrists and ankles moving under your grasp, support those joints instead of pulling on them.  Not sure how to do this correctly?  Ask your therapist for some instruction.
  2. Do not depend on a child’s comfort level to tell you how far a joint should stretch.   Think about typical joint movement instead.   If their hips spread very wide when you place them on your hip, think about holding them facing forward, with their knees in line with their hips, not pressed together.
  3. Give them time to move with you.  Those over-stretched muscles are at a mechanical disadvantage for contraction.  This means that when you tell a child to sit up, you have to give them time to do so before you scoop them up.  They aren’t  being defiant or lazy (I have not, in fact, ever met a lazy baby!).  This is a neuromuscular issue.
  4. Discourage unsafe movements.  Some children find that overstretching their joints gives them more sensory feedback.  It feels good to them.  This is not OK.  You will not be able to stop them every time, but they will eventually learn that their is a right way and a wrong way to move.  Knowing why isn’t necessary.  Yet.  Teach them to respect joint movement and use things like graded joint compression and vibration (your occupational therapist should be able to help you with this) to give them the sensory feedback they want.

Still concerned about safety?  Read Teaching Safety Awareness To Special Needs Toddlers  and  Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way to learn more methods to build independence without injury.

 

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Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers

jeremy-paige-146338-unsplashWhether you live in the city or the ‘burbs, you almost certainly use a stroller for your infant or toddler.  Even parents who use slings or carriers for “baby wearing”  find themselves needing a stroller at some point.  Why are strollers a problem for children with low muscle tone?  The answer is simple:  sling seats and ineffective safety straps.

The Challenges of a Sling Seat:

Strollers, especially the umbrella strollers that fold up into slim spaces, have a sling seat, not a flat and firm seat.  Like a hammock or a folding lawn chair, these seats won’t give a child a solid surface that activates their trunk.  When a child sits in a sling seat, they have to work harder to hold their body in a centered and stable position.

Why is that important when you are transporting your child in a stroller?

Because without a stable and active core, your child will have to work harder to speak and look around.  A child with low muscle tone or hypermobility that is in a sling seat may be inclined to be less active and involved, even fatigued from all that work to stay stable.  It could appear that they are shy or uninterested, but they might be at a physical disadvantage instead.  A collapsed posture also encourages compensations like tilting the head and rounding the back.  Will it cause torticollis or scoliosis?  Probably not, but it is certainly going to encourage a child to fall into those asymmetrical patterns.  Kids with low tone don’t need any help to learn bad habits of movement and positioning.

Safety strap location and strapping use in many strollers is less than optimal.  

There are usually hip and chest straps on a stroller.  Some parents opt to keep them loose or not use them at all, thinking that kids are being unnecessarily restrained.  I think this is a mistake for kids with low tone.

Good support at the hips is essential when a child with low tone sits in a sling seat.  It is their best chance to be given some support.  Chest straps are often not adjusted as the child grows.  I see two patterns:  Straps too low for an older child, and straps too high for a younger one.  The latter issue usually occurs when parents never adjusted the straps after purchase.  They left them in the position they were in from the factory.  Make sure that the straps are tight enough to give support but not so tight that a child is unable to move at all.  A child that is used to sliding forward may complain about having their hips secured so that they can’t slouch, but they will get used to it.

You may have to reposition a child with low tone from time to time as you go about your errands or adventures.  They often don’t have the strength or body awareness to do so themselves.  They could be in a very awkward position and not complain at all.  Check their sitting position as you stroll along.  Good positioning isn’t “one and done” with these kids, but doing it right will benefit them while they are in the stroller, and also when they get out!

Think about your high chair as well.  Read How To Pick A High Chair For Your Special Needs Child and A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair.

Looking for more information that could make things easier for your child and for yourself?

I wrote an e-book just for you!

The JointSmart Child: Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is finally available!

Filled with more information on seating and positioning, how to select the right high chair, and how to help your child learn to get dressed and use a spoon or fork, it is the manual that parents have been looking for!  There are even chapters on how to improve connection and communication with family, your child’s siblings, teachers, and doctors.  Parents who know what to do and what questions to ask feel confident and empowered.

This unique book is available as a printable and click-able download at Your Therapy Source and as a read-only digital download on Amazon.com

Is your back killing you every time you lift your child out of their stroller or crib?

Parents of children with special needs often neglect their own bodies in service of their children.  This is a shame because there are things you can do to protect your body and make your life easier while caring for your child.  Read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child and Universal Design For Parents of Special Needs Kids: It’s Important for You Too!.

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Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problems With Blankets

 

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Everyone knows that sleep is important.  Research in sleep science (yes, this is a thing) tells us that our brains are working to digest the day’s learning, the immune system is active during sleep, and our bodies are repairing and renewing tissues and organs while we slumber.  As much as we need sleep, kids need it more.  They are building the brains and bodies they will carry into their future.  Children need good quality sleep as much as they need healthy food.

Helping children to sleep well is usually a combination of creating good and consistent bedtime routines, giving them a full day of physical action and warm social interaction, and developing a healthy sleep environment.  This means providing a sleep-positive environment and removing any barriers to sleeping well.  But giving kids the chance to get a good night’s sleep can be harder when a child has hypermobility.

Some of the challenges to sleep for hypermobile kids are sensory-based, some are related to activity during the day, and some are orthopedic.  Here is a list of things that make sleep more challenging for these kids:

  • Children with limited proprioception and kinesthesia due to low tone or excessive joint mobility can have difficulty shifting down into a quiet state for sleep.  They spend their day seeking sensory input;  not moving reduces the sensory information that makes them feel calm and organized.  Being still is a bit similar to being in a sensory deprivation tank, and it’s not always calming.  To understand more about the sensory concerns of hypermobility, take a look at Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children.
  • Some hypermobile kids have joint or muscle pain that keeps them up or wakes them up in the middle of the night.  Pain also makes kids more restless sleepers.  Restless sleepers thrash around a bit under the covers, becoming trapped in multiple layers of bed linens, or they can fall asleep in awkward positions that result in pain.
  • Children that are sedentary during the day for any reason (preference for tablet or video play, fatigue, pain, etc) may not be physically tired enough at night.  They may also be staying up too late at night.  Good sleep hygiene includes enough daytime activity combined with a conscious wind-down hours before bedtime occurs.
  • Some children with generalized low tone or joint hypermobility (especially with a connective tissue disorder) have issues with the partial collapse of their airway during sleep.  They snore or gasp in their sleep, and appear exhausted even after a full night’s sleep.  This is a serious issue.  Sleep apnea should be evaluated and addressed by a professional.
  • Hypermobile kids can get arms and legs caught in their bedclothes or between crib slats and mattresses.  Any layer can be a potential problem, from the sheet to the decorative afghan that Granny sent for his birthday.  For more information on hypermobility and safety, read Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing
  • Limbs can slide off the mattress during deep sleep and create strain on ligaments and tendons.   You and I depend on our brain to perceive an awkward position and take corrective action by waking us slightly.  The same child who “w” sits and slides off a chair without noticing is not going to wake up when her arm is hanging off the bed during sleep, even though the tissues are stretching beyond their typical range of motion.
  • Waking up to go to the bathroom or having to clean up a nighttime accident ruins sleep.  It isn’t uncommon to have older kids wear protective garments well past 5 at night, and some children need to practice holding in their urine to expand the bladder’s ability to hold it all night long.  This is something to discuss with your child’s urologist or pediatrician, since “holding it in” can be it’s own problem.  Read Teach Kids With EDS Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In! to learn more about the pitfalls of too much “holding”.

Here are some simple strategies that may improve your child’s sleep:

  • Try a duvet or a flannel sheet set to minimize the number of layers of bedclothes.
  • Use a rashguard suit instead of pajamas.  I am particularly fond of the zip-front style so that less force is needed to get arms in and out while dressing.  You can peel it off more easily.  The lycra creates sensory feedback that can support body awareness while keeping them cozy.  An all-in-one suit also gives a bit of support so that limbs don’t easily overstretch.  A little bit of proprioceptive input in a breathable fabric that can also generate a bit of neutral warmth (from body heat) to keep tissues from getting too stiff.
  • Avoid footie sleepers that are too short.  Too-small footie sleepers create compressive forces on joints and could even encourage spinal torque.  Hypermobile kids will be the last ones to complain since they often don’t feel discomfort right away.  My preference is not to use these sleepers at all with hypermobile kids or kids with low tone.  See the next suggestion for another reason why I feel this way.
  • Make them take off those footie sleepers when they wake up and walk around.  As fabric twists and children stand/walk on the fabric, not the soles, it creates a safety risk underfoot.  Less sensory feedback and slippery soles!!  Get them dressed once they wake up.
  • Address sleep apnea, lack of daytime activity, and toilet training/scheduling rather than waiting for things to improve.  Not all young children achieve night time dryness on pace with other children, but ignoring the impact isn’t going to help things.
  • Carefully consider safety issues before you try a weighted blanket.  Originally sold for kids on the autistic spectrum and for kids with sensory processing disorders without muscular or orthopedic issues, these blankets have become popular with other groups.  The biggest concern for hypermobile kids is that placing weight (meaning force) on an unstable joint over time without conscious awareness or adult monitoring is a safety issue.  It is possible to create permanent ligament injury or even subluxation of a joint with weights, depending on a limb’s position, the length of time weight is applied, and the amount of force placed on a joint.  Talk the idea of a weighted blanket over with your OTR or PT before you order one of these blankets.
  • Consider aromatherapy, gentle massage, white noise machines, and other gentler and less invasive sleep strategies to help your child sleep well.  Consider techniques like gentle joint compression and/or deep pressure brushing, but ask your therapists how to adapt it for your child’s specific needs  Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?.  For kids who sleep well but wake up stiff, learn how to use gentle massage and possibly heat to help them get going.  Do not ignore pain at bedtime, or complaints of pain on awakening.  These are important clues that you need to address.   Ask your occupational therapist or your pediatrician for ideas to adapt your bedtime routine (your OT)  or your pain plan ( your MD) to handle nighttime pain.
  • Try K-Taping or Hip Helpers for stability.  Kineseotape stays on for days and gives joint support and sensory input while your child sleeps.  Hip Helpers are snug lycra bike shorts that limit extreme hip abduction for the littlest kids when their legs rotate out to the sides excessively.  They gently help your child align hip joints correctly.  As with weighted blankets, I strongly recommend consulting with your therapists to learn about how to use both of these strategies safely.  When used incorrectly, both can create more problems for your child.  Simply put, any strategy that could help could also be misused and create harm.

Need more information about managing hypermobility in children?  Take a look at Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports? , Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection Strategies and Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior

Announcing my new e-books on pediatric hypermobility!

There are now TWO e-books for the parents and therapists of hypermobile kids ages 0-5 and 6-12!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One: The Early Years is the first e-book in the series.  It is a practical manual for parents and therapists.  Learn more about how hypermobility affects sensory and behavioral development as well as motor skills, and how to pick the right equipment to help a child thrive!  There are ideas for every ADL skill and even strategies to talk with your family and doctor about your child’s needs.  Read more about this book at The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!  You can buy this unique new book as a clickable and printable download at Your Therapy Source or as a read-only download at Amazon.com

The JointSmart Child: Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume Two:  The School Years takes things further and deeper.  It is a larger book, filled with information to make life easier, safer and more independent for kids 6-12.  Learn how to pick the best chairs, desks, bikes, even the best sports and musical instruments for a child.  Understand the best ways to communicate with your child’s teachers and medical providers to get the results you want.  This book has an extensive appendix with forms and handouts for parents and therapists alike.  There are even some simple recipes to build fine motor and sensory skills through cooking.  It is available on Amazon and on Your Therapy Source  and you don’t need a kindle to download it; they have a simple way to load it on your phone or iPad!  Read more about this book here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

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A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair

Therapists often recommend these well-designed seats for kids that need solid foot support, but even the best hip and chest strapping doesn’t always mean that a child is actively using their feet for postural control.

As a young therapist, I used tape, foam, and towel rolls everywhere, as if I was creating a modern sculpture.  For the most part, all I got for my effort was frustration.  Food and force tend to make short work of the most ingenious wedges and supports on a chair that is used for feeding.  Then I got older and smarter, and decided to make this a lot easier on everyone.

I wanted to share my easiest strategy for helping children place their feet on a foot plate and keep them there:  shoes!

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The little guy in the “before” photo has generalized low tone and hypermobility.  His pelvis is reasonably stable using the existing straps on the chair, and he is able to reach forward to finger-feed, partially activating his trunk and hip musculature.  But those feet just tapped away on the footplate, and his legs remained extended at the knee through most of the meal.  He is too little to respond to any verbal prompts for posture, but not completely addicted to gaining sensory input though his feet.  He is there for the food, and the foot movements were his way of gaining sensory input and entertaining himself!

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Non-skid soles, and totally stylish, too!

Just putting on his tiny boat shoes gives him some “grip” on the foot plate, and he stayed in this position for the rest of the meal with our repositioning his body at all!  He still has to develop some hip control so his knees don’t move laterally as he reaches forward.  Using shoes with non-skid soles is an easy hack to help him get some distal stability without constantly touching and repositioning him.  Kids that get a lot of therapy and need almost total help for toileting and dressing really start to hate all our manhandling after a while.  This limits how much handling an adult needs to do to help a child use this type of chair correctly.

If you still get too much sliding around, my first thought is to check the height of the footplate.  If your child grew a bit, the footplate may need to be lowered.  Or you could try Dycem The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem.  This non-skid matting is easy to clean and is super-grippy.  It works as a seat mat as well.  If your child’s hips are stable, their feet can be more effective in supporting their posture.  You can buy it without being a therapist; it is available on Amazon!

Need another chair for play?  Read The Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!

This gives parents and therapists an idea that requires very little effort and can  deliver immediate results!

Does your child W-sit?  Are you wondering why it is discouraged by your therapists and what to do about it…today?  Read Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters)!

Looking for more information on managing hypermobility in young children?

I wrote an e-book just for you!

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The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is a new e-book, filled with practical strategies to improve your child’s safety and independence every day.  I provide methods to pick out the right high chair, the best way to teach utensil use and dressing, and how to make your home safer for your child.  There are chapters on building your communication skills so that you can get the most support from your family, your babysitter or nanny, even better results from your child’s doctors!  There are forms that you can fill out to provide caregivers with the essential information they need to help your child, and forms that help you strategize your goals for school meetings and doctor’s appointments.

You can find this unique e-book as a printable and click-able download at Your Therapy Source  or as a read-only download at Amazon

 

Wondering how you are going to deal with potty training?  

Check out my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  There is so little useful advice out there for parents of children with hypotonia!  My book as checklists and specific strategies for pre-training, choosing equipment such as seat inserts, and covers the sensory and social/emotional consequences of low tone as it relates to learning this important life skill.

My book is available on my website tranquil babies, at  Amazon and on Your Therapy Source, a great resource for pediatric therapy materials. 

Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior

 

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There is nothing worse than using a scientific study that correlates two variables and assuming causation. Translation:  If behaviors typical of disorder “A” are seen in a lot of people with problem “B”, we cannot assume that “A” is the cause of their behavior.   But we do it all the time.  People who love coffee adore studies that say coffee drinkers seem to live longer.  People who hate to exercise are validated by reports that find the number of heart attacks after exercise “is increasing”.

When it comes to labeling children’s behavior, we should take a couple of big steps back with our erroneous reasoning.  And when the label is ADHD, take three more.  Not because ADHD isn’t a big issue for families.  The struggles of kids, parents and educators shouldn’t be minimized.  But we should be cautious with labels when two situations occur:  children at very young ages and trying to make a diagnosis when it is  determined largely by clinical observation, not scientific testing.  Seeing ADHD in a child with hypermobility is one of those situations.

Hypermobility without functional movement problems is very common in young children.  Super-bendy kids that walk, run, hit a ball and write well aren’t struggling.  But if you have a child that cannot meet developmental milestones or has pain and poor endurance, that is a problem with real-life consequences.  Many of them are behavioral consequences.  For more on this subject, take look at How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Regulation in Children.

Yes, I said it.  Hypermobility is a motor problem that has a behavioral component.  I don’t know why so little has been written on this subject, but here it is:  hypermobile kids are more likely to fidget while sitting, more likely to get up out of their chairs, but also more likely to stay slumped on a couch.  They are more likely to jump from activity to activity, and more likely to refuse to engage in activities than their peers.  They drape themselves on furniture and people at times.  And they don’t feel as much discomfort as you’d think when they are in unusual positions Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way

Why?  Hypermobility reduces a child’s ability to perceive body position and degree of movement, AKA proprioception and kinesthesia.  It also causes muscles to work harder to stabilize joints around a muscle, including postural muscles.  These muscles are working even when kids are asleep, so don’t think that a good rest restores these kids the same way another child gets a charge from a sit-down.

Hypermobility impacts all the things that kids like to do.

Got a child who whines?  You  may have a child with a huge issue with frustration and asynchronous development.  What is that? A kid whose skills in some areas lag behind his otherwise normal developmental path.  Read  Got a Whining Child Under 5? Here Is Why They Whine, And What To Do About It  to know what to do to turn this ship around.

Read Hypermobility and Music Lessons: How to Reduce the Pain of Playing and How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Activity Levels in Children and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports? to learn how to help hypermobile kids get more out of life with less behavioral problems.

Looking for more practical information about raising your hypermobile child?

I wrote 2 books for you; One for young children, and one about supporting school-age kids!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One: The Early Years is your guide to making life easier for your baby, toddler and preschooler.

Read The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!  to learn how my new e-book will build your confidence and give you strategies that make your child safer and more independent…today!  The above link includes a brief preview on positioning principles every parent of a child with hyper mobility should know.  You can find a read-only download on Amazon and a printable and click-through version on Your Therapy Source.

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume Two:  The School Years is an even larger and more comprehensive book for children ages 6-12.  Filled with information on how to pick the right chair, desk, bike and even clothes that make kids safer and more independent; this book is for parents and therapists that want to make a real difference in a child’s life and feel empowered, not confused.  It is available on Your Therapy Source as a printable download and on  Amazon  as an e-book, and don’t worry: you can download it from Amazon on your iPad as well as your Kindle.  Amazon makes it easy!

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When a hypermobile child starts to move, the brain receives more sensory input from the body, including joints, skin and muscles.  This charges up a sensory system that was virtually starving for information.  Movement from fidgeting and movement by running around the house are solutions to a child’s sense that they need something to boost their system.  But fatigue can set in very quickly, taking a moving child right back to the couch more quickly than her peers.  It looks to adults like she couldn’t possibly be tired so soon.  If you had to contract more muscles harder and longer to achieve movement, you’d be tired too!  Kids  develop a sense of self and rigid habits just like adults, so these “solutions” get woven into their sense of who they are.  And this happens at earlier ages than you might think.  Take a look at Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children to understand a bit more about this experience for hypermobile kids.

Then there is pain.  Some hypermobile kids experience pain from small and large injuries.  They are more likely to be bruised,  more likely to fall and bump into things, and more likely to report what pediatricians may call “growing pains”.  Sometimes the pain is the pull on weak ligaments and tight muscles as bones grow, but sometimes it isn’t.  Soreness and pain lead some kids right to the couch.  After a while, a child may not even complain, especially if the discomfort doesn’t end.  Imagine having a lingering headache for days.  You just go on with life.  These kids are often called lazy, when in truth they are sore and exhausted after activities that don’t even register as tiring for other children their age.

How can you tell the difference between behaviors from ADHD and those related to hypermobiilty?  I think I may have an idea.

After a hypermobile child is given effective and consistent postural support, sensory processing treatment, is allowed to rest before becoming exhausted (even if they say they are fine), and any pain issues are fully addressed, only then can you assess for attentional or emotional problems.  Some days I feel like I am living in a version of “The Elephant and the Six Blind Men”, in which psychiatrists, psychologists and pediatricians are all saying that they see issues with sensory tolerance, movement, attention, pain and social development, but none of them see the whole picture.

Occupational therapists with both physical medicine and sensory processing training are skilled at developing programs for postural control and energy conservation, as well as adapting activities for improved functioning.  They are capable of discussing pain symptoms with pediatricians and other health professionals.

I think that many children are being criticized for being lazy or unmotivated, and diagnosed as lacking attentional skills when the real cause of their behaviors is right under our noses.  It is time to give these kids a chance to escape a label they may not have.

 

Share Could Your Pediatric Therapy Patient Have a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue? with your therapist and see what reactions you receive.  The truth is that many kids don’t get a diagnosis as early as possible.  Rare syndromes aren’t the first thing your pediatrician is thinking of, but you can raise the issue if you have more information and feedback.

Looking for more posts on hypermobility?  Check out Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork? , Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problem With Blankets  and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports? for useful strategies to manage  hypermobility and support both physical health and functional skills.

Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children

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When most parents think of sensory processing issues, they think of the children who hate clothing tags and gag on textured foods.   Joint hypermobility, regardless of the reason (prematurity, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, head injury, etc) can result in kids who stumble when they move and wobble when they rest.  They are seen by orthopedists and physical therapists, and told to build up those weak muscles.  Well, hypermobile kids have sensory processing issues too!   And they deserve more effective treatment for these issues than they typically receive.

Lack of joint integrity, especially decreased joint stability, results in a decrease in proprioception and kinesthesia.  These two under-appreciated (and poorly explained) senses tell a child about her body’s positions and movements without the use of vision. The literature out there is sparse.

If you are hoping that a lot of research on this topic exists, and you think your pediatrician understands why your child can’t grasp a pencil but can squeeze the @@#$% out of Play-Doh, good luck.  

Who will believe AND understand you?  Your OT!

Most of the scientific research into proprioception and hypermobility has been done by PTs, and is focused on proprioception in the leg. They are interested in how it affects mobility.

The problems with poor proprioception and kinesthesia go far beyond walking.  Essentially no research has been done on hand function or the practical application of research to living skills of any kind when it comes to hypermobility syndromes and proprioception. But OTs can teach you and your child’s classroom staff about the connections between sensory processing and motor performance.  They can help your child improve skills based on their knowledge of neurology and function.

Here is a simple explanation of how proprioception and kinesthesia affect function.  Consider the process for touch-typing.  Your awareness of your hand’s position while at rest on the home row is proprioception.  You know where your movement starting and end points are via proprioception without looking.  Your awareness of the degree of movement in a joint while you are actively typing is kinesthesia.  Kinesthesia tells you that you just typed a “w” instead of an “e” without having to look at the screen or at your fingers.Your brain “knows”, through learned feedback loops, that your finger movement was too far to the left to type the letter “w”, but far enough to have been a “e”.  Teachers and others call this “muscle memory”, but that is a misnomer.  Muscles have no memory; brains do.  And brains that aren’t getting the right information send out the wrong instructions to muscles.  Oops!

You are able to grade the amount of force on each key because your skin, joint and muscle sensors transmit information about the resistance you meet while pressing down each key.   Your brain compares it previous typing success and the results on the screen, and makes adjustments in fractions of a second. This is sensory processing at work.

Why do children with hypermobility have proprioceptive and kinesthetic processing problems?  Because information from your body is transmitted is through receptors embedded in the tissue within and surrounding the joints.   These receptors respond to muscle and tendon stretch, muscle contraction, and pressure within the joint.   Joint hypermobility creates less stimulation (and thus less accurate information) to these sensory receptors.  Like the game at the carnival, the ball isn’t hit hard enough to ring the bell at the top of the post.  The sensory information coming into the brain is either insufficient or delayed (or both), and therefore the brain’s output of directions to achieve postural stability or dynamic movement is correspondingly poor.

This shows up as a collapsed posture, difficulty quickly changing positions to catch a ball or leap over an obstacle, a heavy-footed gait, and a whole lot of other difficulties.  One of the most common issues are the awkward or extreme positions these kids get into, and sometimes strongly prefer.  They look like they should be in pain, but they aren’t.  Read more about what to do when your child insists on sitting in a position that could harm them in Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way

What should parents be looking for when they wonder if proprioception is affecting their child’s functional performance?

Can children with hypermobility improve their sensory processing and thereby improve the quality of their movements in daily life?  Absolutely.

Because sensory processing is a complex skill, addressing each component of functional performance will give the hypermobile child more skills.  Building muscular strength within a safe range of joint movement is only one aspect of treatment.  If your child is experiencing difficulty in music lessons or when playing sports, please read Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports? and  Hypermobility and Music Lessons: How to Reduce the Pain of Playing for some useful ways to think about what you say to your child.  Positioning a child to give them more sensory feedback while in action is essential.  Increasing overall sensory processing by using other sensory input modalities is often ignored but very helpful.  And don’t forget joint protection.  They have to last as long as possible.  Read Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection Strategies to understand more about this topic.

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I’ll bet that you didn’t think of toileting as a proprioceptive issue.  When thinking about toileting the hypermobile child, the biggest problem is often an interoceptive issue; the kind of proprioception that involves internal organs.  This can make it difficult for hypermobile kids to feel when they need to “go” in time to get to the bathroom, but it can also create retention.  The urge isn’t very powerful for them. Read For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up and Teach Kids With EDS Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In!.  And of course, you might want an e- book that will help you with toilet training.  I wrote it for youThe Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

I believe that vestibular input is one of the most powerful but rarely used modalities that can improve the sensory-motor performance of hypermobile children.  They don’t have to demonstrate vestibular processing deficits to benefit from a vestibular program.  The lack of effective sensory processing due to poor proprioceptive registration and discrimination creates problems with balance, and targeted vestibular input is designed to fine-tune the brain’s balance center.  I could link you to scholarly articles on this concept, but you would fall asleep before finishing them.  Trust me, vestibular input can make a difference.  This program can be done without stressing fragile joints, which is often a limitation for the programs that focus too much on muscular strengthening and stabilization activities.

 

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My favorite sensory processing strategy for hypermobile kids?  The use of rhythmic music during movement.

Therapeutic music programs that use the powerful effects of sound on the brain are effective treatments for hypermobile children.  Using sound to improve vestibular processing increases the quality and the speed of response to a loss of balance.  Muscle tone increases in children while they are listening through stimulation of  midbrain centers, and this combo of improved tone and improved vestibular processing helps children improve their safety while moving and even while sitting still. For all of you with kids who fall off chairs while doing nothing, you know what I mean!  I have been trained in the use of Therapeutic Listening through Vital Sounds, and I really like to ease of using Quickshifts.  These short pieces of music that entrains both sides of the brain for activation and attention can really make a change in hypermobile kids.  There are other programs that work well too.  I prefer Vital Links’ Quickshifts for greater options and ease of use in a daily schedule Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation.  You download their free app and buy the music for your phone!  The most significant benefit to adding a listening program to a home program for any child or adult is that there is no stress on connective tissue, even for kids that are in a lot of pain and have very limited mobility.  For kids that have POTS as well as hypermobility, this can be a real advantage.  The middle ear is connected intimately to the vagus nerve, which impacts the autonomic nervous system.  Treatment of the vestibular system can directly improve the ability of the autonomic nervous system, without the risks associated with many activities.

Another technique to enhance sensory processing is the Wilbarger Protocol.  Although not created for children with hypermobility, I believe that it can be altered to address poor proprioceptive discrimination in specific conditions such as EDS.  Read Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? for a look at how I adapt the protocol with safety in mind.

Kineseotape can be helpful to provide some of the missing proprioceptive information.  When your child has a connective tissue disorder, or is under the age of 3, skin issues complicate taping.  Read Can You K-Tape Kids With Ehlers-Danlos and Other Connective Tissue Disorders? for some suggestions to make this treatment more effective and less risky.

It is difficult to explain to insurers and sometimes even neurologists ( don’t get me started on how hard it is for orthopedists to follow this),  but if you understand the complex processes that support sensory processing, you will be changing the background music in your clinic or your home in order to capitalize on this effect!  I recommend the Vital Links Therapeutic Listening programs for their ease of use and child-friendly music.

Children with hypermobility can benefit from occupational therapy sessions that provide more than a pencil grip and a seat cushion.  All it takes is an appreciation for the sensory effects of hypermobility on function.

Looking for a manual that empowers you and your hypermobile child?

I wrote 2 e-books just for you; one for the smaller kids, and one for the school-age child!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One: The Early Years is my e-book for the parents and therapists of young children, packed with strategies that make life easier and build a toddler’s and preschooler’s skills!

It is available as a read-only download on Amazon and as a printable and clickable download at Your Therapy Source    YTS has it bundled with my book on toilet training for a complete set at a discounted price.

Read how my new e-book can help you today:  Parents of Young Hypermobile Children (and Their Therapists) Finally Get Their Empowerment Manual!

Need a book for older kids?  Here you go!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving with Hypermobility Volume Two:  The School Years is my newest book, filled with even more information for kids ages 6-12.  There are strategies to help them write and play sports with less risk of injury, plus methods to communicate with teachers and doctors to get the services your child needs.  Learn how to pick the best chairs, bikes, even the right clothes to make your child safer and more independent.  Read more about it here:  Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!  It is available on Amazon as a read-only download and as a printable e-book on Your Therapy Source!

Does your hypermobile child also have toileting issues?  

My e-book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, could help you make progress today!  

The Practical Guide is available on my website, tranquil babies and on Amazon as well as at your therapy source, a great place for therapists and parents to find exercise programs and activities for children.  Read more about it, and hear what parents have to say about this unique e-book:The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

photo-1445800363697-51e91a1edc73  Toilet Training Help Has Arrived!             

My most popular post,  Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!) inspired me to write a manual to help parents with potty training.  There was nothing in books or online that really helped families, just a few lines about being patient and not pushing children….which is no help at all! Families deserve good strategies and an explanation for all the frustration they experience.

What makes this book so unique?  Media specialists say that you have to be able to explain your product in the time it takes for the average elevator ride.  OK, here is my elevator speech on The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone:

My book provides a complete explanation of the motor, sensory, and social/emotional effects that low muscle tone has on toilet training.  It does so without being preachy or clinical.  Parents understand whether their child is ready to train, and how to start creating readiness immediately.  They learn how to pick the right potty seat, the right clothes, and how to decide between the “boot camp” or gradual method of training.  A child’s speech delays, defiance or disinterest in potty training are addressed in ways that support families instead of criticizing them.

  • Each readiness quiz helps parents figure out what issues need to be addressed for successful training and reminds them of their child’s strengths.
  • Chapter summaries give a quick review of each section.  Parents decide which chapter they need to read next to get more information.
  • Clinical information is explained in layman’s terminology, so parents don’t have to Google “interoception” to understand the neurology that causes a child not to recognize that they have a full bladder.

Here’s what parents are saying about The Practical Guide”:

The Practical Guide has truly been heaven sent!  Although my globally delayed 5-year old daughter understood the idea of toileting, this skill was certainly not mastered.  Our consultations with Cathy and her guide on how to toilet train have given me the knowledge I’ve needed to understand low tone as a symptom that can be tackled.  Morgan has made visible advances, and I am so encouraged and empowered because I know what piece we need to work on next.  Thank you, Cathy, for writing this book!”      Trish C, mother of Morgan, 5 years old

“I would often say to myself “Cathy has to put all of her accumulated wisdom down into a book”.  I am happy to say-here it is!  You will find no one with more creative and practical  solutions.  Her insights and ideas get the job done!”     Laura D. H., mother of M., 4 years old 

Cathy has been a “go-to’ in every area imaginable, from professional referrals to toilet training.  I can’t say enough positive things about her.  She has been so insightful and helpful on this journey.”  Colleen S. mother of two special needs children

Want a bit of a preview?  Here is a small section from Chapter One: Are You Ready For Toilet Training?  Is Your Child?

Parents decide to start toilet training for three primary reasons.  Some families train in anticipation of an outside event, such as enrolling their toddler in a preschool that doesn’t change diapers.  Another example would be the impeding birth of a sibling  Parents who want to train their older child hope that they can avoid having two children in diapers, They do not expect to have the time and attention for training after their new baby arrives.

The second common reason to begin training is when their child achieves a skill that parents believe to be a precursor to successful toileting.  For example, when children learn a word or a sign for urination, adults may thing that they may finally be able to train them.  The final reason is when school staff or their pediatrician recommends that they start training.  whatever your reason, you are reading this book because you are wondering if you and/or your child could be ready for toilet training.

These are the eight types of toileting readiness: 

  1. Financial
  2. Physiological
  3. Communication 
  4. Cognitive 
  5. Social/emotional 
  6. Clothing Management
  7. Time and Attention
  8. Appropriate Equipment

How can you find my book?

Three ways:  Visit my website  tranquil babies and click on “e-book” at the top of the homepage, buy it on Amazon, or visit  Your Therapy Source, a wonderful site for parents and therapists.  Just search for The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone!

 

Need more than toilet training strategies?

 My new e-book, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is for you!  Like The Practical Guide, it has solutions to everyday problems, but this book also gives you strategies to make your child and your home safer, have mealtime and dressing successes, and even learn how to communicate better with your family, babysitter, teacher and doctor!  Find it on Amazon.com.  It is also available as a printable download on Your Therapy Source.

HELP HAS ARRIVED!

Kids With Low Muscle Tone Can Sit For Dinner: A Multi-Course Strategy

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Low muscle tone can create so many different issues during mealtime.  Staying still and safe in a chair can be a real issue for these kids, and yet many are seen to be just “behaving badly”.

Here is a roadmap to navigate mealtimes when your child has issues with wriggling, sliding, falling or leaping up every few minutes.

First, understanding how low muscle tone influences behavior can help defuse some of the criticism and arguments.  Low tone creates too much information, as instability creates movement that distracts even the child who is moving.   Inadequate muscle and joint receptor stimulation doesn’t produce enough information in the form of position and movement sense for the brain to process (proprioception and kinesthesia for all you therapists out there). Add in loose ligaments around major joints (it is common to see these two issues together), and your child can really struggle to stay in her chair even with the best intentions.  Imagine yourself in this situation:  you cannot feel that your hips are sliding off the seat until you are just about on the floor, and when you do move, it seems like that is the best way to get more information about where your body is vis-a-vis the chair.  No one wants you to move, and no one wants you to fall.  If your child with low muscle tone decides that she dislikes sitting for meals but happily eats everything standing up or on the run, this could be the reason.

Parents need to start teaching self-feeding skills early and well.  Read Hypermobility Or Low Tone? Three Solutions to Mealtime Problems and Teach Utensil Grasp and Control…Without the Food! for some additional strategies that work.

 

Get a good chair.  Today.

Kids can start out looking pretty good on a chair, especially if they have a supportive chair that is the right height, seat depth, and provides solid foot placement on the floor or on a footplate. Booster seats that aren’t buckled securely onto a chair are a huge hazard for these children.  Don’t go there.   The Tripp Trapp chair has been the go-to chair for a lot of children with muscle tone issues for years.  There are others that provide similar support without the serious sticker shock.  Look around and ask your therapist what features are important.  Here is a good chair for kids over 7: Need a Desk Chair for Your Hypermobile School-Age Child? Check out the Giantex Chair.  For an easy way to keep those feet stable on a chair with a footplate, read A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair.

One adaptation I like for these chairs or booster seats with a smooth surface is using non-skid shelf liner as a seat mat.  It can be cut to your exact seat dimensions and cleaned easily.  I don’t recommend adhering it to the seat.  The mat gives a little bit of grip on clothing that limits the sliding on a smooth wooden seat.  Some children like the matting glued to the footplate as well for tactile feedback, but that makes it harder to clean, a tripping hazard at times, and it can bunch up when the adhesive loosens in spots.  If you need more grip. try Dycem.  This rehab staple is available from therapy supply stores and online retailers.  Read about what it can do for your child here; The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem.

Don’t stop there.  Think tableware:

I also like to make custom placemats for younger children that encourage them to place their non-dominant hand on the mat unless it is needed for bowl stabilization. I trace that hand in a location on the mat that is slightly in front of them, next to the traced line for the bowl/plate.   A great resource for dinnerware that doesn’t fly off the table is OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues.  Hand-on-the-table is not as polite as “hand in your lap” positioning, but these children often need to use that hand in this position to shift their weight forward through their trunk and use it actively to stabilize their body  during the meal.  The usual result if their hand is left in their lap?  They slump toward one side, or that non-dominant hand will start to twist the tablecloth, bang on the table or make another action to energize or stabilize their nervous system.

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Utensil use is often rejected because it can be so frustrating for kids.  Avoid the temptation to allow a finger-feeding diet by teaching good utensil use and giving them good utensils.  i covered this in Which Spoon Is Best To Teach Grown-Up Grasp? and Teach Spoon Grip By Making It Fun And Sharing a Laugh With Your Child.

 

Safety is always on my mind.  Hopefully on yours too.

Kids with low tone often try to rock while sitting or try to rock the chair to get more proprioception and some vestibular input.  Placing any chair near a wall is often the difference between a child flipping the chair backwards or not.  Banging the chair into the wall once or twice requires a conversation; flipping backward head first may require an E.R. visit!

Being involved in the family meal is always desirable for social skills and developing family togetherness.  For kids with low muscle tone, conversation can help them stay more alert at a time of day when they may be fatigued.  Their desire for movement might be satisfied by socially acceptable actions:  help setting the table, getting up to retrieve things from the kitchen for family members during the meal, and cleaning up.  If you were looking for reward chart items or just assigning household tasks to all family members, this can help everyone.

Want activités apart from mealtime to build skills?  Try Should You Use Pre-Mixed Dough to Bake With Your Toddler? and Doing OT Telehealth? Start Cooking (And Baking)!

Looking for more help with positioning and ADL’s?

I wrote an e-book just for you!

The JointSmart Child;  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is your manual for finding the right equipment, helping them build all the self-care sills, and is your manual to teach your child how to move safely and independently through these first few years.

I want parents to be empowered and have resources.  Doctors and therapy programs aren’t providing the depth of information parents need.  Read more about my book here: The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

This book gives parents solid information to help navigate positioning, utensil selection, how to motivate and teach skills to kids ages 0-5.  It offers information on improving communication with family members, babysitters, teachers and even doctors!  There are blank forms to help parents think through their questions and feel confident in every situation!

My unique e-book is available on Amazon  as a read-only download or on  Your Therapy Source  as a printable and click-able download.  Read it today and start feeling more confident as a parent right away!

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Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!)

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Most parents assume that toilet training a child with low tone (also called hypotonia) isn’t going to be easy. A child with low muscle tone often crawls later, walks later, and may speak later.  But  low tone can affect toilet training in ways both obvious and subtle.  As an occupational therapist, I want to share an explanation of why one of the consequences of low muscle tone can make teaching this skill just as hard as teaching your child to walk independently.  Hint:  it isn’t something you can see, and it isn’t balance or stability. (both very important, but quite visible, consequences of low tone).

When muscles are not “sitting at the ready” for use as they are in normal tone, it takes more time, more stimulation, more effort or all three to get them to contract and tighten.  But it also means that the receptors inside the muscles of the bladder, the rectum, and the abdomen are not firing as frequently or as strongly.  The brain’s interpretation of a change from resting state to the stimulation of stretched receptors is known as proprioception.  The special ed teachers I work with in Early intervention would call it “body awareness”.  This internal awareness of a change in pressure within your bladder wall, in your rectum and against your pelvic wall is what compels you and I to get up and go to the bathroom.  This is “interoception“, proprioception’s internal version.  With low muscle tone, your toddler is honestly stating the truth when they tell you that they don’t feel like they have to “go” and then they pee on the floor right in front of you.  They may have only a very weak sensation of fullness, or it may only be perceived a few moments before they really have to go.  That is what lower proprioceptive registration is like.  All of a sudden, the level of muscle receptor firing has reached a point where it is perceived.  And now there is a puddle on your floor.

What can you do?  

There may never have been a better time to get this going Potty Training in the COVID-19 Age .  In previous posts I have mentioned that all the strategies to develop cooperation and frustration tolerance are keys to teaching a toddler anything at all. I go into more details about readiness in Low Tone and Toilet Training: The 4 Types of Toileting Readiness .  When you are facing an issue where the feelings that you are trying to sensitize them to are fleeting and invisible, you are going to need them to be very highly motivated indeed.  That means that you work on Happiest Toddler on the Block techniques such as patience stretching and “feeding the meter”.  These create positive parenting interactions that help your toddler listen to you when you tell them it is potty time and then keep them on the toilet long enough to make things happen.  If your toddler ignores your directions unless it is something he wants to do, and engages you in defiance games constantly just to see your reaction, you have some work to do regarding his behavior before toilet training is going to be successful.

Here are specific suggestions for toilet training the child with low muscle tone:

  • They need stronger physical sensations at the time when you sit them down on the potty. A full bladder stretches, and that stretch of the muscle wall is what they don’t feel unless it is a profound stretch. That means that they should drink a larger amount of liquid at specific times, so that bladder is really full at a predictable time. Yes, it means that roaming the house with a sippy cup will not work for toilet training.  A half-full bladder isn’t going to give enough sensory input but it will empty when they bend forward or squat.   If you have done the patience stretching and feeding the meter techniques from Happiest Toddler on the Block, your toddler can handle the change in beverage scheduling and they will be fully hydrated at all times.  They are just not drinking all day long.  The same thing can be done with meals, allowing for small snacks but having real toddler-sized meals, not grazing throughout the day.  Full colon= more contractions and more sensations.  A diet with fiber makes the poop firmer, and therefore sensations in the colon are more obvious.  A higher-fiber diet is a good way to prevent constipation as well.   This is a summary of a recent comment from a parent that used these methods:  She told me that using this strategy made her life so much less stressful when taking her daughter out of the house for preschool or appointments.  She knew that her child had fully emptied her bladder and wouldn’t be taking a big drink again until lunch.  She didn’t have to scout out bathrooms constantly and keep watching her daughter for little signs that she needed to “go”.  Makes sense to me!
  • Watch your child closely, and see what their current voiding/defecating schedule seems to be.  Not every person is like clockwork, but you need to know when they are likely to go once you have the drinking and eating schedule down.  What goes in will come out.  Kidneys are more reliable than intestines.  About 30-45 minutes after a big drink, that bladder should be filling up.  For some children it can be 20-25 minutes. Then you know when to get them on the potty.  There is no point in sitting there when they are close to empty.  Everyone gets irritated.  Is your child unwilling to drink enough?  You may need to offer a better beverage, such as a yogurt drink or chocolate milk.  Serve them with a “silly straw” and watch that drink disappear!
  • These children just don’t have that much abdominal muscle tension to help with voiding, so the physical position they are in can help or hurt their efforts.  Sitting with your knees lower than your hips and your body leaning back reduces the intra-abdominal pressure.  You want to increase their ability to push gently, so sitting on a floor potty in a slightly flexed position can help them contract their abdominal muscles and push with their feet to get some pressure going.  Heavy straining is not recommended and so do not demonstrate or encourage superhero-sized force. Read my post on selecting potty seats that help your child do the deal. Picking A Potty Seat For Toilet Training A Child With Low Tone
  • Don’t distract them from the job at hand.  You might not be comfortable with a long conversation about toilet activities, but if they are chatting about Thomas the Tank Engine while that pee is coming out, they have no idea how it happened or what it felt like just before the stream started.  They missed out on becoming more aware of the sensory experience, and low muscle tone can make that sensation very fleeting and vague for them to begin with.  If they arrived on the potty full and ready to do their thing, this doesn’t have to be an extended bathroom visit.  This bathroom trip is all about the process of using the toilet, not a rehash of what they did at school that day.
  • Last, and probably obvious to most parents, is that you cannot shame a child for not recognizing a sensation that is not easily perceived because of low muscle tone.  They didn’t cause this issue, and once they are motivated to use the toilet, they would like to please you and feel proud of themselves too.

For more information about managing toilet training with low tone, take a look at these posts:      Is Your Constipated Toddler Also Having Bladder Accidents? Here Are Three Possible Reasons Why  and Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child?

If your child has mastered the potty seat but isn’t ready for the “big time”, read Low Tone and Toilet Training: Using The Adult Toilet for two pieces of equipment that can raise their game, and a few other strategies to help them make the switch to using an adult toilet.

Want a guide to toilet training?

 I wrote an e-book for you!

I am so excited to offer parents a comprehensive manual that prepares them well and explains so many of the confusing situations that they encounter.  Don’t be afraid to train….be prepared!  Learn more how my e-book can help you make changes in your child’s skills today by reading The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Help Has Arrived!

Here’s what parents are saying about The Practical Guide”:

The Practical Guide has truly been heaven sent!  Although my globally delayed 5-year old daughter understood the idea of toileting, this skill was certainly not mastered.  Our consultations with Cathy and her guide on how to toilet train have given me the knowledge I’ve needed to understand low tone as a symptom that can be tackled.  Morgan has made visible advances, and I am so encouraged and empowered because I know what piece we need to work on next.  Thank you, Cathy, for writing this book!”      Trish C, mother of Morgan, 5 years old

“I would often say to myself “Cathy has to put all of her accumulated wisdom down into a book”.  I am happy to say-here it is!  You will find no one with more creative and practical  solutions.  Her insights and ideas get the job done!”     Laura D. H., mother of M., 4 years old 

Cathy has been a “go-to’ in every area imaginable, from professional referrals to toilet training.  I can’t say enough positive things about her.  She has been so insightful and helpful on this journey.”  Colleen S. mother of two special needs children

How do you buy my book?  Three ways:  Buy it at my website tranquil babies, on Amazon.com, or visit your therapy source, a wonderful site for parents and therapists.

 

Need more than toilet training advice?  

I wrote a more comprehensive e-book for the parents and therapists of young children with hypermobility!

Read my post The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today! to learn how my new book, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility will help you with all aspects of raising a hypermobile child, from selecting the best equipment to communicating with your child’s doctors!  It is currently available on Amazon.com as a digital download, and it is a printable download with a clickable table of contents on Your Therapy Source!

 

For even more support with your toddler, visit my website tranquil babies and speak with me directly by purchasing a phone/video consultation.  You will be able to ask your specific questions and get up-to-date equipment recommendations and more!

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