Tag Archives: hypotonia

Is Your Child With Low Tone “Too Busy” to Make it to the Potty?

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Since writing my first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I have fielded a ton of questions about the later stages of potty training.  One stumbling block for most children appears to be “potty fatigue”.  They lose the early excitement of mastery, and they get wrapped up in whatever they are doing.  What happens when you combine the effects of low tone with the inability of a  young child to judge the consequences of delaying a bathroom run?  This can lead to delaying a visit to the bathroom until it is too late.  Oops.

Kids with low tone often have poor interoceptive processing.  What is that?  Well, interoception is how you perceive internal sensory information.  When it comes to toileting, you feel fullness in your bladder that presses on your abdominal wall, in the same way you feel a full stomach.  This is how any of us know that we have to “go”.  If you wait too long, pressure turns to a bit of pain.  Low muscle tone creates a situation in which the stretch receptors in the abdominal muscles and in the bladder wall itself don’t get triggered until there is a stronger stimulus.  There may be some difficulty in locating the source of pressure as coming from the bladder instead of bowel, or even back or stomach.  This leads to bathroom accidents if the toilet is too far away,  if you can’t walk fast enough, or if you cannot pull down your pants fast enough.

Add in a child’s unwillingness to recognize the importance of the weak sensory signals that he or she is receiving because they are having too much fun or are waiting for a turn in a game or on a swing.  Not being able to connect the dots is common in young children.  That is why we don’t let them cross a busy street alone until they are well over 3 or 4.  They are terrible at judging risk.

What should parents do to help their children limit accidents arising from being “too busy to pee?”

  1. Involve kids in the process of planning and deciding.  A child that is brought to the potty without any explanations such as “I can see you wiggling and crossing your legs.  That tells me that you are ready to pee” isn’t being taught how to recognize more of their own signs of needing the potty.
  2. Allow kids to experience the consequences of poor choices.  If they refused to use the potty and had an accident, they can end up in the tub to wash up, put their wet clothes in the washer, and if they were watching a show, it is now over.  They don’t get to keep watching TV while an adult wipes them, changes them, and cleans up the mess!
  3. Create good routines.  Early.  Just as your mom insisted that you use the bathroom before leaving the house, kids with low tone need to understand that for them, there is a cost to overstretching their bladder by “holding it”  Read  Teach Kids With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In! to learn more about this.  The best strategy is to encourage a child to urinate before their bladder is too full, make potty routines a habit very early in life, and to develop the skills of patience stretching Stretch Your Toddler’s Patience, Starting Today!  from an early age.  Creating more patience in young children allows them to think clearly and plan better, within their expected cognitive level.

Looking for more information on managing low tone and hypermobility in daily life?

I wrote three e-books for you!

My e-book on toilet training, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With low Muscle Tone, and my e-books on managing pediatric hypermobility, are available on Amazon as read-only downloads, and on Your Therapy Source as printable downloads.  Your Therapy Source has bundled my books together for a great value.  You can buy both the toilet training and the Early Years books together, or both hypermobility books together!

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How To Improve Posture In Children With Low Muscle Tone… Without a Fight!

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With pediatric occupational therapy going on at home using parents as surrogate therapists, it isn’t helpful to ask a parent to do too much repositioning of children with low tone.  First of all, kids don’t like it.  Second, kids really don’t like it.

I have never met a child that enjoys therapeutic handling, no matter how skilled I am, and I don’t think I ever will.  They don’t know why we are placing their hands or legs somewhere, and they tend not to like to be told what to do and how to do it.  The best you can hope for at times is that they tolerate it and learn that therapists are going to be helping them do what they want to do For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

Leaving a child in an awkward and unstable position isn’t the right choice either.  They are going to struggle more and fail more when out of alignment and unsteady.  If you know this is going to happen, you can’t let them stay that way because you also know that this will blow back in your face in the form of frustration, short attention span, and children developing a sense that whatever they are doing or whomever they are doing it with is a drag.  A real drag.

So how can you improve the posture of a child with low tone without forcing them physically into a better position?

  • Use good seating and other equipment that facilitates postural control.  A chair that is too small, a slippery floor and footie pajamas….try not to make stabilization too hard unless you are a licensed therapist and you know how to juggle all the variables.  If you are a parent, ask your child’s therapist what kind of seating, tables, ride-on toys, etc are the right ones.  Don’t think your therapist knows what you need?  My e-books can help you and your therapist because they have guidelines and checklists to learn about selecting all of these things.  They are part of The JointSmart Child series! Read more here The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!   and here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!
  • Respect fatigue.  A mom told me today that her daughter’s telehealth PT sessions end in tears at least half the time due to exhaustion.  That is simply unacceptable.  Great therapists don’t leave kids that upset for parents to deal with after the session.  They taper the session demands, and end on a good note.  There are always other positions to play in or other things to do when a child has fatigued postural muscles.  You know they are fried because if you present them with a fun activity and they simply cannot manage it, you aren’t being played.  They are tired.
  • Create routines that incorporate postural control.  My little clients over 2 know that their non-dominant hand had a job to do and what it is.  They know that we place feet in a certain way, and that specific games call for specific positions.  When good posture is a habit, there fights are fewer going forward.  They know what to do and what I expect and I know that they will be successful if they follow our routines.  Read How To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” and Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way for more information on this subject.

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Potty Training in the COVID-19 Age

 

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Parents are staying home with their toddlers and preschoolers now.  All day.  While this can be a challenge, it can also be the right time to do potty training.

Here’s how to make it work when you want to teach your toddler how to “make” in the potty:

  1. You don’t have to wait for readiness.  What you might get instead is a child that has lost the excitement of being praised by adults, and fears failure more than seeks praise or rewards.  If that sounds like your child,  quickly read Waiting for Toilet Training Readiness? Create It Instead!
  2. Have good equipment.  If you don’t have a potty seat that fits your child or a toilet insert and a footstool that is stable and safe, now is the time to go online shopping for one.  Without good equipment, you are already in trouble.  Children should be able to get on and off easily and not be fearful of falling off the toilet.  If you are training a preschooler and not a toddler, you really need good equipment.  They are bigger and move faster.  Safety and confidence go hand in hand.
  3. Have a plan for praise and rewards.  Not every child will want a tiny candy, but nobody should expect a new toy for every time they pee in the potty.  Know your kid and know what gets them to try a new skill.  Some children don’t do well with effusive praise Sensitive Child? Be Careful How You Deliver Praise , so don’t go over the top if this is your kid.
  4. Know how to set things up for success.  If your child is typically-developing, get Oh Crap Potty Training by Jamie Glowacki, because she is the best person to tell you how to help you be successful.  She even has a chapter just on poop!  If your child has hypotonia or hypermobility, consider my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  It is inexpensive, available on Amazon and Your Therapy Source, and gives you checklists and explanations for why you need to think out-of-the-box to potty train these kids.  You don’t leave for vacation without a map.  Don’t wing this.  Just don’t.
  5. Build your ability to calm yourself first.  Exactly like on an airplane, (remember them?  We will get back on them eventually) you need to calm yourself down in the face of refusals, accidents and tantrums.  You are no good to anyone if you are upset.  Read Stress Relief in the Time of Coronavirus: Enter Quickshifts and Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts? for some ideas.

Looking for more information on potty training?  I wrote an e-book for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone was my first e-book.  It is still my best seller.  There is a reason:  it helps parents and kids succeed.  This unique book explains why learning this skill is so tricky, and it gives parents and therapists detailed strategies to set kids (and parents) up for success!  Understanding that the sensory and social-emotional impacts of low muscle tone are contributing to potty training deals is crucial to making this skill easier to learn.  I include a readiness guide, strategies to pick the best equipment and clothes (yes, you can dress them so that they struggle more!), and how to move from the potty seat onto the adult toilet.

It is available on Amazon and on Your Therapy Source, a great site for materials for therapists as well as parents looking for homeschooling ideas.

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Joint Protection And Hypermobility: Investing in Your Child’s Future

 

allen-taylor-dAMvcGb8Vog-unsplash.jpgParents of hypermobile kids are taught early on not to pull on limbs while dressing them or picking them up.  It is less common to teach children how to protect their own joints.

In fact, parents may be encouraged by their child’s doctors to let them be “as active as they want to be, in order to build their strength”.  Without adding in education about  good joint protection, this is not good advice.  This post is an attempt to fill in the space between “don’t pull on their limbs” and “get them to be more active”.

Why?  Because hypermobile joints are more vulnerable to immediate injury and also to progressive damage over time.  Once joint surfaces are damaged, and tendons and ligaments are overstretched, there are very few treatments that can repair those situations.  Since young children often do not experience pain with poor joint stability, teaching good habits early is essential.  It is always preferable to prevent damage and injuries rather than have to repair damage.  Always.  And it is not as complicated as it sounds.

The basic principles of joint protection are simple.  It is the application that can become complex.  The more joints involved in a movement or that have pre-existing pain or damage, the more complex the solution.  That is why some children need to be seen by an occupational or physical therapist for guidance.  We are trained in the assessment and prescription of strategies based on clinical information, not after taking a weekend course or after reading a book.  I am thinking of writing an e-book on this subject, since there really is nothing much out there for hypermobile people at any age….

Some of the basics of joint protection are:

  • Joints should be positioned in anatomical alignment while at rest and as much as possible, while in use.  Knowing the correct alignment doesn’t always require a therapist.  Bending a foot on it’s side isn’t correct alignment.  Placing a wrist in a straight versus an angled position is.
  • Larger joints should execute forceful movements whenever possible.  That means that pushing a heavy door open with an arm or the side of your body is better joint protection than flattening your hand on it.  The exception is if there is damage to those larger structures.  See below.
  • Placing a joint in mid-range while moving protects joint structures.  As an example, therapists often pad and thicken handles to place finger joints in a less clenched position and allow force to dissipate through the padding.  We discourage carrying heavy loads with arms held straight down or with one arm/hand.

Remember:  once joints are damaged, if joints are painful, or the muscles are too weak to execute a movement, activity adaptations have to be considered.  There is no benefit to straining a weak or damaged joint structure.

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The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

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My first e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, was a wonderful experience to write and share.  The number of daily hits on one of my most popular blog posts  Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children helped me figure out what my next e-book topic should be.

Hypermobility is a symptom that affects almost every aspect of a family’s life.  Unlike autism or cerebral palsy, online resources for parents are so limited and generic that it was obvious that what was needed was solid practical information using everyday language.  Being empowered starts with knowledge and confidence.

The result?  My new e-book:  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility.  Volume One:  The Early Years.

What makes this book unique?

  • This manual explains how and why joint instability creates challenges in the simplest tasks of everyday life.
  • The sensory and behavioral consequences of hypermobility aren’t ignored; they are fully examined, and strategies to manage them are discussed in detail.
  • Busy parents can quickly spot the chapter that answers their questions by reading the short summaries at the beginning and end of each chapter.
  • This book emphasizes practical solutions over theories and medical jargon.
  • Parents learn how to create greater safety at home and in the community.
  • The appendices are forms that parents can use to improve communication with babysitters, family, teachers and doctors.

Who should read this book?

  1. Parents of hypermobile children ages 0-6, or children functioning in this developmental range.
  2. Therapists looking for new ideas for treatment or home programs.
  3. New therapists, or therapists who are entering pediatrics from another area of practice.
  4. Special educators, and educators that have hypermobile children mainstreamed into their classroom.

Looking for a preview?  Here is a sample from Chapter Three:  Positioning and Seating:

Some Basic Principles of Positioning:

Therapists learn the basics of positioning in school, and take advanced certification courses to be able to evaluate and prescribe equipment for their clients.  Parents can learn the basics too, and I feel strongly that it is essential to impart at least some of this information to every caregiver I meet.  A child’s therapists can help parents learn to use the equipment they have and help them select new equipment for their home.  The following principle are the easiest and most important principles of positioning for parents to learn:

  • The simplest rule I teach is “If it looks bad, it probably IS bad.”  Even without knowing the principles of positioning, or knowing what to do to fix things, parents can see that their child looks awkward or unsteady.  Once they recognize that their child isn’t in a stable or aligned position, they can try to improve the situation.  If they don’t know what to do, they can ask their child’s therapist for their professional advice.
  • The visual target is to achieve symmetrical alignment: a position in which a straight line is drawn through the center of a child”s face, down thorough the center of their chest and through the center of their pelvis.  Another visual target is to see that the natural curves of the spine (based on age) are supported.  Children will move out of alignment of course, but they should start form this symmetrical position.  Good movements occurs around this centered position.
  • Good positioning allows a child a balance of support and mobility.  Adults need to provide enough support, but also want to allow as much independent movement as possible.
  • The beginning of positioning is to achieve a stable pelvis.  Without a stable pelvis, stability at the feet, shoulders and head will be more difficult to achieve.  This can be accomplished by a combination of a waist or seatbelt, a cushion, and placing a child’s feet flat on a stable surface.
  • Anticipate the effects of activity and fatigue on positioning.  A child’s posture will shift as they move around in a chair, and this will make it harder for them to maintain a stable position.
  • Once a child is positioned as well as possible, monitor and adjust their position as needed.  Children aren’t crockpots; it isn’t possible to “set it and forget it.”  A child that is leaning too far to the side or too far forward, or whose hips have slid forward toward the front of the seat, isn’t necessarily tired.  They may simple need repositioning.
  • Equipment needs can change over time, even if a child is in a therapeutic seating system.  Children row physically and develop new skills that create new positioning needs.  If a child is unable to achieve a reasonable level of postural stability, they may need adjustments or new equipment.  This isn’t a failure; positioning hypermobile children is a fluid experience.

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume One:  The Early Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon.com

And also as a click-through and printable download  on Your Therapy Source!  

NEW:  Your Therapy Source is selling my new book along with The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone as a bundle, saving you money and giving you a complete resource for the early years!

Already bought the book?  Please share your comments and suggestions for the next two books!  Volume Two is coming out in spring 2020, and will address the challenges of raising the school-aged child, and Volume Three focuses on the tween, teen, and young adult with hypermobility!

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Have a Child With Low Tone or a Hypermobile Baby? Pay More Attention to How You Pick Your Little One Up

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Carrying and holding kids is such a natural thing to do.  But when your child has hypermobility due to low muscle tone, joint issues or a connective tissue disorder, how you accomplish these simple tasks makes a difference.  Your actions can do more than get them from one position or location to another: they can build a child’s skills, or they can increase the risk of damage by creating excessive flexibility or even accidentally injure a child’s joints.

How could something so simple be both a problem as well as an opportunity?  Because hypermobility creates two issues that have to be addressed:  Less strength and stability at vulnerable joints, and less sensory feedback regarding pain and position sense in your child.  The ligaments, tendons, muscles and joint capsule at every hypermobile joint are more likely to be damaged when excessive force is placed on them.

Knowing how much force is too much isn’t easy without some instruction from a skilled therapist.  Depending on your child to react quickly and accurately to accidental stretch or pressure by crying or pulling away isn’t a good idea.  Their excessive flexibility reduces firing of receptors deep within all of these tissues in response to excessive force.  You may have looked at your child’s shoulders or ankles and think “That looks uncomfortable.  Why isn’t she fussing?”  This is the reason.  It means that you will have to be altering your actions to reduce the risk of harm.

As I mentioned earlier, this is also an opportunity.  It is an opportunity to teach your child about safe movement and positioning, right from the start.  Even the youngest child will pick up on your emphasis on alignment, control and safety.  They are always listening and learning from you every day, so incorporate effective movement into your handling and help your child build awareness and independence today!

Here are some strategies for you and your child:

  1. Always spread the force of your grasp over their body, and place your hands on the most stable locations, not the most flexible.  Lift a child through their trunk, not by holding their arms.  If they cannot steady their head, support it while you lift.  If you feel those little bones in their wrists and ankles moving under your grasp, support those joints instead of pulling on them.  Not sure how to do this correctly?  Ask your therapist for some instruction.
  2. Do not depend on a child’s comfort level to tell you how far a joint should stretch.   Think about typical joint movement instead.   If their hips spread very wide when you place them on your hip, think about holding them facing forward, with their knees in line with their hips, not pressed together.
  3. Give them time to move with you.  Those over-stretched muscles are at a mechanical disadvantage for contraction.  This means that when you tell a child to sit up, you have to give them time to do so before you scoop them up.  They aren’t  being defiant or lazy (I have not, in fact, ever met a lazy baby!).  This is a neuromuscular issue.
  4. Discourage unsafe movements.  Some children find that overstretching their joints gives them more sensory feedback.  It feels good to them.  This is not OK.  You will not be able to stop them every time, but they will eventually learn that their is a right way and a wrong way to move.  Knowing why isn’t necessary.  Yet.  Teach them to respect joint movement and use things like graded joint compression and vibration (your occupational therapist should be able to help you with this) to give them the sensory feedback they want.

Still concerned about safety?  Read Teaching Safety Awareness To Special Needs Toddlers  and  Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way to learn more methods to build independence without injury.

 

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Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers

jeremy-paige-146338-unsplashWhether you live in the city or the ‘burbs, you almost certainly use a stroller for your infant or toddler.  Even parents who use slings or carriers for “baby wearing”  find themselves needing a stroller at some point.  Why are strollers a problem for children with low muscle tone?  The answer is simple:  sling seats and ineffective safety straps.

The Challenges of a Sling Seat:

Strollers, especially the umbrella strollers that fold up into slim spaces, have a sling seat, not a flat and firm seat.  Like a hammock or a folding lawn chair, these seats won’t give a child a solid surface that activates their trunk.  When a child sits in a sling seat, they have to work harder to hold their body in a centered and stable position.

Why is that important when you are transporting your child in a stroller?

Because without a stable and active core, your child will have to work harder to speak and look around.  A child with low muscle tone or hypermobility that is in a sling seat may be inclined to be less active and involved, even fatigued from all that work to stay stable.  It could appear that they are shy or uninterested, but they might be at a physical disadvantage instead.  A collapsed posture also encourages compensations like tilting the head and rounding the back.  Will it cause torticollis or scoliosis?  Probably not, but it is certainly going to encourage a child to fall into those asymmetrical patterns.  Kids with low tone don’t need any help to learn bad habits of movement and positioning.

Safety strap location and use in many strollers is less than optimal.  

There are usually hip and chest straps on a stroller.  Some parents opt to keep them loose or not use them at all, thinking that kids are being unnecessarily restrained.  I think this is a mistake for kids with low tone.

Good support at the hips is essential when a child with low tone sits in a sling seat.  It is their best chance to be given some support.  Chest straps are often not adjusted as the child grows.  I see two patterns:  Straps too low for an older child, and straps too high for a younger one.  The latter issue usually occurs when parents never adjusted the straps after purchase.  They left them in the position they were in from the factory.  Make sure that the straps are tight enough to give support but not so tight that a child is unable to move at all.  A child that is used to sliding forward may complain about having their hips secured so that they can’t slouch, but they will get used to it.

You may have to reposition a child with low tone from time to time as you go about your errands or adventures.  They often don’t have the strength or body awareness to do so themselves.  They could be in a very awkward position and not complain at all.  Check their sitting position as you stroll along.  Good positioning isn’t “one and done” with these kids, but doing it right will benefit them while they are in the stroller, and also when they get out!

Think about your high chair as well.  Read How To Pick A High Chair For Your Special Needs Child and A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair.

Looking for more information that could make things easier for your child and for yourself?

I wrote an e-book for you!

The JointSmart Child: Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is finally available!

Filled with more information on seating and positioning, how to select the right high chair, and how to help your child learn to get dressed and use a spoon or fork, it is the manual that parents have been looking for!  There are even chapters on how to improve connection and communication with family, your child’s siblings, teachers, and doctors.  Parents who know what to do and what questions to ask feel confident and empowered.

This unique book is available as a printable and click-able download at Your Therapy Source and as a read-only digital download on Amazon.com

Is your back killing you every time you lift your child out of their stroller or crib?

Parents of children with special needs often neglect their own bodies in service of their children.  This is a shame because there are things you can do to protect your body and make your life easier while caring for your child.  Read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child and Universal Design For Parents of Special Needs Kids: It’s Important for You Too!.

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