Tag Archives: hypermobility

Hypermobile Child? Simple Dental Moves That Make a Real Difference in Your Child’s Health

 

 

tetbirt-salim-696162-unsplashAs the OT on a treatment team, I am the ADL (Activities of Daily Living) go-to person.   Why then, do so few parents ask me what ideas I have about ADLs, especially dental care?  Probably because OT as a profession has developed this reputation as either focused on handwriting or sensory processing.  Maximizing overall health and building skills by improving ADLs is often pushed to the side.  Not today.

People with connective tissue disorders have a greater chance of cavities and more serious dental problems.   Knowing what to do for your child and why it is important helps parents make changes in behavior with confidence and clarity.

Here are my suggestions to support a child that has been diagnosed or is suspected of having Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility or any connective tissue disorder:

  1. Teach good dental hygiene habits early.  Why?  Habits, especially early habits, seem to be harder to dislodge as we age.  Good self-care habits can and should last a lifetime.  Automatically brushing and flossing gently twice a day is cheap and easy.  Make it routine, not optional.  I know how this can become a fight for young children.  This is one of those things that is worth standing your ground on and making it fun (or at least easy) for children to do.  Brush together, use brushes and pastes with their favorite characters, pair it with something good like music or right before bedtime stories, but don’t think that dental care isn’t important.
  2. Research on people with typical connective tissue suggests dental care reduces whole-body inflammation.  Inflammation seems to be a huge issue for people with connective tissue problems, and no one needs increased inflammation to add to the challenges they have already.  Enough said.
  3. Tools matter.  Use the softest toothbrushes you can find, and the least abrasive toothpaste that does the job.  Tooth enamel is also made from the same stuff and skin and bone, and so are gums.  Treat them well.  Water-powered picks and battery-operated brushes may be too rough, so if you want to try them, observe the results and be prepared to back off it becomes clear that your child’s tissues can’t handle the stress.  Toothpaste that is appealing will be welcomed.  Taste and even the graphics/characters on the tube could make the difference.  My favorite strategy is to give your child a choice of two.  Not a choice to brush or not.
  4. Think carefully about acidic foods.  Lemonades, orange juice, energy drinks, and those citrus-flavored gummies all deposit acids on teeth that are also mixed with natural or added sugars.  Those sugars become sticky on teeth, giving them more time to irritate gums and soften enamel.  Easy hack?  Drink citrus/acidic drinks with a straw.  Goes to the back of the mouth and down the hatch.  At the very least, drink water after eating or drinking acidic foods to rinse things out.
  5. Baby teeth count.   Because your young child hasn’t lost even one baby tooth, you may think this doesn’t apply to you.  Those permanent teeth are in there, in bud form.  Children can develop cavities in baby teeth as well as permanent teeth.  Gum irritation is no different for young children, and they are less likely to be able to tell you what they are feeling.  Sometimes the only sign of a cavity in a young child is a change in eating habits.  This can be interpreted as pickiness instead of a dental problem.
  6. Consider sealants and fluoride   I know…some people are nervous about the composition of sealants and even fluoride, which has been in the public water system here in the US for a long time.  I would never criticize a parent who opted out of either.  It is a personal decision.  But be aware that they don’t increase tissue irritation, and they protect tender enamel, tooth roots and the surrounding gums.  At least have an open discussion with your pediatric dentist about the pros and cons.  I am mentioning sealants here specifically because some parents aren’t aware that this treatment option can reduce cavity formation and gum deterioration.

Looking for more information about ADLs and hypermobility?  Take a look at Easy Ways to Prevent Skin Injuries and Irritations for Kids With Connective Tissue Disorders and Teach Spoon Grip By Making It Fun And Sharing a Laugh With Your Child and Low Muscle Tone and Dressing: Easy Solutions to Teach Independence.

david-clode-635942-unsplash

Advertisements

Hypermobile Toddlers: It’s What Not To Do That Matters Most

 

shawnn-tan-265187.jpg

Do you pick up your toddler and feel that shoulder or those wrist bones moving a lot under your touch?  Does your child do a “downward dog” and her elbows look like they are bending backward?  Does it seem that his ankles are rolling over toward the floor when he stands up?  That is hypermobility, or excessive joint movement.

Barring direct injury to a joint, ligament laxity and/or low muscle tone are the usual culprits that create hypermobility.  This can be noticed in one joint, a few, or in many joints throughout the body.  While some excessive flexibility is quite normal for kids, other children are very, very flexible.  This isn’t usually painful for the youngest children, and may never create pain for your child at any point in their lifetime.  That doesn’t mean that you should ignore it.  Hypermobility rarely goes away, even though it often decreases a bit with age in some children.  It can be managed effectively with good OT and PT treatment.   And what you avoid doing at this early stage can prevent accidental joint injury and teach good habits that last a lifetime.

  1. Avoid over-stretching joints, and I mean all of them.  This means that you pick a child up with your hands on their ribcage and under their hips, not by their arms or wrists.  Instruct your babysitter and your daycare providers, demonstrating clearly to illustrate the moves you’d prefer them to use. Don’t just tell them over the phone or in a text.  Your child’s perception of pain is not always accurate when joint sensory aren’t stimulated (how many times have they smacked into something hard and not cried at all?) so you will always want to use a lift that produces the least amount of force on the most vulnerable joints.  Yes, ribs can be dislocated too, but not nearly as easily as shoulders, elbows or wrists.  For all but the most vulnerable children, simply changing to this lift instead of pulling on a limb is a safe bet.  Read Have a Child With Low Tone or a Hypermobile Baby? Pay More Attention to How You Pick Your Little One Up
  2. Actively discourage sitting, lying or leaning on joints that bend backward.  This includes “W” sitting.   I have lost count of the number of toddlers I see who lean on the BACK  of their hands in sitting or lying on their stomach.  This is too much stretch for those ligaments.  Don’t sit idly by.  Teach them how to position their joints.  If they ask why, explaining that it will cause a “booboo” inside their wrist or arm should be enough.  If they persist, think of another position all together.  Sitting on a little bench instead of the floor, perhaps? Read   Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) for more information and ideas.
  3. Monitor and respect fatigue.  Once the muscles surrounding a loose joint have fatigued and don’t support it, that joint is more vulnerable to injury.  Ask your child to change her position or her activity before she is completely exhausted.  This doesn’t necessarily mean stopping the fun, just altering it.  But sometimes it does mean a full-on break.  If she balks, sweeten the deal and offer something desirable while you explain that her knees or her wrists need to take a rest.  They are tired.  They may not want to rest either, but it is their rest time.  Toddlers can relate.

Although we as therapists will be big players in your child’s development, parents are and always will be the single greatest force in shaping a child’s behavior and outlook.  It is possible to raise a hypermobile child that is active, happy, and aware of their body in a nonjudgmental way.    It starts with parents understanding these simple concepts and acting on them in daily activities.

 

Wondering about your stroller or how to help your child sit for meals or play?  Read Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With StrollersThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!,  Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers and Picking The Best Trikes, Scooters, Etc. For Kids With Low Tone and Hypermobility for practical ideas that help your child today!

Wondering about your child’s speech and feeding development?  Take a look at Can Hypermobility Cause Speech Problems? to learn more about the effects of hypermobility on communication and oral motor skills.

Looking for information on toilet training your child with Ehlers Danlos syndrome, generalized ligament laxity, or low muscle tone?  My e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, gives you detailed strategies for success, not philosophy or blanket statements.  I include readiness checklists, discuss issues that derail training such as constipation, and explain the sensory, motor, and social/emotional components of training children that struggle to gain the awareness and stability needed to get the job done.  You will start making progress right away!

My e-book is available on my website tranquil babies, at Amazon, and at Your Therapy Source.

Is Your Hypermobile Child JointSmart?

Sometimes it must seem that OTs and PTs are the ultimate buzz killers. “Don’t do gymnastics; it could damage your knees” and “I don’t recommend those shoes. Not enough support”. Just like the financial planner that tells you to sell the boat and save more for a rainy day, we therapists can sound like we are trying to crush dreams and scare families.

Nothing could be further from the truth! Our greatest wish is to see all children live their lives with joy, not pain and restriction. Hypermobile children that grow up understanding their body’s unique issues and know how to live with hypermobility are “joint smart” kids. The kids who force their bodies to do things that cause injury or insist on doing things they simply cannot accomplish face two kinds of pain; physical pain, and a feeling that they are failing for reasons they cannot fathom.

Pain at a Young Age?
Very young children with hypermobility don’t usually see OTs and PTs for pain, unless they have JRA or MD. The thing that sends them to therapy initially is their lack of stability. Some impressively hypermobile kids won’t have pain until they are in middle age. Pain (at any age) usually results from damage to the ligaments, tendons and occasionally the joints themselves. When the supporting tissues of a joint are too loose, a joint can dislocate or sublux (partial dislocation). This is often both painful and way too frequent for hypermobile kids. Strains and sprains are very common, and they happen from seemingly innocuous events. Other tissues may bruise easily as well, creating more pain. Disorders such as Ehlers Danlos syndrome can affect skin and vessel integrity as well as joint tissue, so it is not uncommon to see bruising “for no reason” or larger bruises than you would expect from daily activity.

Becoming JointSmart Starts With Parents
So…does your child even understand that they are hypermobile? If they are under 8, almost certainly not. Do they know that they have issues with being unstable? Probably. They may have been labeled “clumsy” or “wobbly”, even weak. Labels are easy to give and hard to avoid. I suggest that parents reframe these labels and try to take the negative sting out of them. Pointing out that people come in an amazing variety of shapes and abilities is helpful, but the most important thing a parent can do is to understand the mechanics, the treatment and how to move and live with hypermobility. Then parents can frame their child’s issues as challenges that can be dealt with, not deficits that have cursed them. How a parent responds to a child’s struggles and complaints is key, absolutely key.

The first step is teaching yourself about hypermobility and believing that options exist for your child. Ask your therapists any questions you have, even the ones you are afraid to ask, and make sure that your therapist has a positive, life-affirming perspective. Most of us do, but if you are at all anxious or worried, it really helps to hear about what can be done, not just what activities and choices are off the table. If you blame yourself for your child’s hypermobility, get support for yourself so that your child doesn’t feel that they are burdening you. They don’t need that kind of baggage on this journey.

Even when we are optimistic and creative as therapists, it doesn’t mean that we won’t tell you our specific concerns about gymnastics and Crocs for children with hypermobility. We will. It would be unprofessional not to. But we want you and your child to develop the ability to understand your options, including the benefits and the drawbacks of those options, and give you the freedom to make conscious choices.

Now that is being smart!

Low Tone and Toilet Training: Learning to Hold It In Long Enough to Make It to The Potty

 

be content

If your child can’t stay dry at night after 5, or can’t make it to the potty on time, there are a number of things that could be going wrong.  I won’t list them all, but your pediatrician may send you to a pediatric urologist to evaluate whether there are any functional (kidney issues, thyroid issues, adrenal issues etc.) or structural issues ( nerve, tissue malformations).  If testing results are negative, some parents actually feel worse rather than better.

Why?  Because they may be facing a situation that is harder to evaluate and treat:  low tone reducing sensory awareness and pelvic floor control.

Yes, the same problem that causes a child to fall off their chair without notice can give them potty problems.  When their bladder ( which is another muscle, after all) isn’t well toned, it isn’t sending sensory information back to the brain.  The sensors that respond to stretch aren’t firing and thus do not give a child accurate and timely feedback.  It may not let them know it is stretched until it is ready to overflow.  If the pelvic floor muscles are also lax, similar problems.  Older women who have been pregnant know all about what happens when you have a weak pelvic floor.  They feel like they have to “go”  but can’t hold it long enough to get to the bathroom!   Your mom and your daughter could be having the same problems!!

What can you do to help your child?  Some people simply have their kids pee every few hours, and this could work with some kids in some situations.  Not every kid is willing to wear a potty watch (they do make them) and the younger ones may not even be willing to go.  The older ones may be so self-conscious that they restrict fluids all day, but that is not a great idea.  Dehydration can create medical issues that they can’t fathom.  Things like fainting and kidney stones.

Believe it or not, many pediatric urologists don’t want kids to empty their bladder before bedtime.  They want kids to gradually expand the bladder’s ability to hold urine for a full 8-10 hours.  I think this is easier to do during the day, with a fully awake kid and a potty close at hand.  Too many accidents make children and adults discouraged.  Feeling like a failure isn’t good for anyone, and children with low tone already have had frustrating and embarrassing experiences.  They don’t need more of them.

There are a few ideas that can work, but they do take effort and skill on the part of parents:

First, practice letting that bladder fill up just enough for some awareness to arise.  You need to know how much a child is drinking to figure out what the right amount is, and your child has to be able to communicate what they feel.  This is going to be more successful with children with at least a 5-6 year-old cognitive/speech level.  Once they notice what they are feeling down there right before they pee, you impress on them that when they feel this way that they can avoid an accident by voiding as soon as they can.  Try to get them to create their own words to describe the sensation they are noticing.  That fullness/pressure/distention may feel ticklish, it may be felt more in their belly than lower down; all that matters is that you have helped your child identify it and name it.

You have to start with an empty bladder, and measure out what they are drinking so you know approximately how much fluid it takes them to perceive some bladder stretching.    It helps if you can measure it in a way that has meaning for them.  For me, it would be how many mugs of coffee.  For a child it might be how many mini water bottles or small sport bottles until they feel the need to “go”.  You also need to know how long it takes their kidneys to produce that amount of urine.  A potty watch that is set to go off before they feel any sensation isn’t teaching them anything.

The second strategy I like involves building the pelvic floor with Kegels and other moves.  Yup, the same moves that you do to recover after you deliver a baby.  The pelvic floor muscles are mostly the muscles that you contract to stop your urine stream.  Some kids aren’t mentally ready to concentrate on a  stop/start exercise, and some are so shy that they can’t do it with you watching.  But it is the easiest way to build that pelvic floor.  There are other core muscle exercises that can help, like transverse abdominal exercises and pelvic tilt exercises.  Boring for us, and more boring for kids.  But they really do work to build lower abdominal strength.  If you have to create a reward system for them to practice, do it.  If you have to exercise  with them, all the better.  A strong core and a strong pelvic floor is good for all of us!

Tell your child to stand up and check again to see if he “has to go”.  Why? Because the extra force of gravity on that full bladder will add sensory information.  Many children with low muscle tone sit or lie down while playing.  The force of a full bladder isn’t felt as intensely, and young children aren’t always able to parse the small cues.  Stand up, and there should be more force on the internal sphincter and more of a sense that it’s time to use the toilet.

Finally, don’t forget that the same things that make adult bladders edgy will affect kids.  Caffeine in sodas, for example.  Spicy foods.  Some medications for other issues irritate bladders or increase urine production.  Don’t forget constipation.  A full colon can press on a full bladder and create accidents.

Interested in learning more about toilet training?  My e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is available on my website, tranquil babies.  Just click ‘e-book” on the ribbon at the top of the home page, and learn about my readiness checklists, and how to deal with everything from pre-training all the way up to using the potty in public!

 

 

 

 

Hypermobility in Young Children: When Flexibility Isn’t Functional

Your grandma would have called it being ” double jointed”.   Your mom might mention that she was the most flexible person in every yoga class she attended.  But when extra joint motion reduces your child’s performance or creates pain, parents get concerned.  Sometimes pediatricians and orthopedists do not.

Why would that happen?  A measure of flexibility is considered medically within the norm for children and teens.  Doctors often have no experience with rehab professionals, so they can’t share other resources with parents.  This can mask some significant issues with mild to moderate hypermobility in children.  Parents leave the doctor’s office without a diagnosis or advice, even in the face of their child’s discomfort or their struggles with handwriting or recurrent sports injuries.  Who takes hypermobility seriously?  Your child’s OT and PT.

Therapists are the specialists who analyze functional performance and create effective strategies to improve stability and independence.  I will give a shout-out to orthotists, physiatrists and osteopaths for solutions such as splints and prolotherapy.  Their role is essential but limited, especially with younger children. Nobody is going to issue a hand splint or inject the ligaments of a child under 5 unless a child’s condition is becoming very poor very quickly.  Adaptations, movement education and physical treatments are better tolerated and result in more functional gains for most middle and moderately involved hypermobile children.  Take a look at Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children to understand more about what an OT can do to help your child.

Low tech doesn’t mean low quality or low results.  I have done short consults with children that involve only adaptations to sitting and pencil choice for handwriting, with a little ergonomic advice and education of healthy pacing of tasks thrown in.  All together, we manage to extend the amount of time a child can write without pain.  Going full-tilt paperless is possible when pain is extreme, but it involves getting the teachers and the district involved.  Not only is that time-consuming and difficult to coordinate, it is overkill for those mildly involved kids who don’t want to stand out.  Almost nothing is worse in middle school than appearing “different”.  A good OT and a good PT can help a child prevent future problems, make current ones evaporate, or minimize a child’s dependence and pain.

Hypermobile kids are often bright and resourceful, and once they learn basic principles of ergonomics and joint protection, the older children can solve some of their own problems.  For every child that is determined to force their body to comply with their will to compete without adaptation, I meet many kids that understand that well-planned movements are smarter and give them less pain with more capability.  But they have to have the knowledge in order to use it.  Therapists give them that power.

Parents:  please feel free to comment and share all your great solutions for your child with hypermobility, so that we all can learn from YOU!

Is your hypermobile child also struggling with toilet training or incontinence?  Check out Low Tone and Toilet Training: Learning to Hold It In Long Enough to Make It to The Potty  to gain an understanding of how motor and sensory issues contribute to this problem, and how you can help your child today!

Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!)

56494543081585p__3

Most parents assume that toilet training isn’t going to be easy. A child with low muscle tone often crawls later, walks later, and may speak later.  But  low tone can affect toilet training in ways both obvious and subtle.  As an occupational therapist, I want to share an explanation of why one of the consequences of low muscle tone can make teaching this skill just as hard as teaching your child to walk independently.  Hint:  it isn’t something you can see, and it isn’t balance or stability. (both important but quite visible consequences of low tone)

When muscles are not “sitting at the ready” for use as they are in normal tone, it takes more time, more stimulation, more effort or all three to get them to contract and tighten.  But it also means that the receptors inside the muscles of the bladder, the rectum, and the abdomen are not firing as frequently or as strongly.  The brain’s interpretation of a change from resting state to the stimulation of stretched receptors is known as proprioception.  The special ed teachers I work with in Early intervention would call it “body awareness”.  This internal awareness of a change in pressure within your bladder wall, in your rectum and against your pelvic wall is what compels you and I to get up and go to the bathroom.  This is “interoception“, proprioception’s internal version.  With low muscle tone, your toddler is honestly stating the truth when they tell you that they don’t feel like they have to “go” and then they pee on the floor right in front of you.  They may have only a very weak sensation of fullness, or it may only be perceived a few moments before they really have to go.  That is what lower proprioceptive registration is like.  All of a sudden, the level of muscle receptor firing has reached a point where it is perceived.  And now there is a puddle on your floor.

What can you do?  Well, in previous posts I have mentioned that all the strategies to develop cooperation and frustration tolerance are keys to teaching a toddler anything at all. I go into more details about readiness in Low Tone and Toilet Training: The 4 Types of Toileting Readiness .  When you are facing an issue where the feelings that you are trying to sensitize them to are fleeting and invisible, you are going to need them to be very highly motivated indeed.  That means that you work on Happiest Toddler on the Block techniques such as patience stretching and “feeding the meter”.  These create positive parenting interactions that help your toddler listen to you when you tell them it is potty time and then keep them on the toilet long enough to make things happen.  If your toddler ignores your directions unless it is something he wants to do, and engages you in defiance games constantly just to see your reaction, you have some work to do regarding his behavior before toilet training is going to be successful.

Here are specific suggestions for toilet training the child with low muscle tone:

  • They need stronger physical sensations at the time when you sit them down on the potty. A full bladder stretches, and that stretch of the muscle wall is what they don’t feel unless it is a profound stretch. That means that they should drink a larger amount of liquid at specific times, so that bladder is really full at a predictable time. Yes, it means that roaming the house with a sippy cup will not work for toilet training.  A half-full bladder isn’t going to give enough sensory input but it will empty when they bend forward or squat.   If you have done the patience stretching and feeding the meter techniques from Happiest Toddler on the Block, your toddler can handle the change in beverage scheduling and they will be fully hydrated at all times.  They are just not drinking all day long.  The same thing can be done with meals, allowing for small snacks but having real toddler-sized meals, not grazing throughout the day.  Full colon= more contractions and more sensations.  A diet with fiber makes the poop firmer, and therefore sensations in the colon are more obvious.  A higher-fiber diet is a good way to prevent constipation as well.   This is a summary of a recent comment from a parent that used these methods:  She told me that using this strategy made her life so much less stressful when taking her daughter out of the house for preschool or appointments.  She knew that her child had fully emptied her bladder and wouldn’t be taking a big drink again until lunch.  She didn’t have to scout out bathrooms constantly and keep watching her daughter for little signs that she needed to “go”.  Makes sense to me!
  • Watch your child and see what their current voiding/defecating schedule seems to be.  Not every person is like clockwork, but you need to know when they are likely to go once you have the drinking and eating schedule down.  What goes in will come out.  Kidneys are more reliable than intestines.  About 30-45 minutes after a big drink, that bladder should be filling up.  For some children it can be 20-25 minutes. Then you know when to get them on the potty.  There is no point in sitting there when they are close to empty.  Everyone gets irritated.  Is your child unwilling to drink enough?  You may need to offer a better beverage, such as a yogurt drink or chocolate milk.  Serve them with a “silly straw” and watch that drink disappear!
  • These children just don’t have that much abdominal muscle tension to help with voiding, so the physical position they are in can help or hurt their efforts.  Sitting with your knees lower than your hips and your body leaning back reduces the intra-abdominal pressure.  You want to increase their ability to push gently, so sitting on a floor potty in a slightly flexed position can help them contract their abdominal muscles and push with their feet to get some pressure going.  Heavy straining is not recommended and so do not demonstrate or encourage superhero-sized force. Read my post on selecting potty seats that help your child do the deal. Picking A Potty Seat For Toilet Training A Child With Low Tone
  • Don’t distract them from the job at hand.  You might not be comfortable with a long conversation about toilet activities, but if they are chatting about Thomas the Tank Engine while that pee is coming out, they have no idea how it happened or what it felt like just before the stream started.  They missed out on becoming more aware of the sensory experience, and low muscle tone can make that sensation very fleeting and vague for them to begin with.  If they arrived on the potty full and ready to do their thing, this doesn’t have to be an extended bathroom visit.  This bathroom trip is all about the process of using the toilet, not a rehash of what they did at school that day.
  • Last, and probably obvious to most parents, is that you cannot shame a child for not recognizing a sensation that is not easily perceived because of low muscle tone.  They didn’t cause this issue, and once they are motivated to use the toilet, they would like to please you and feel proud of themselves too.

For more information about managing toilet training with low tone, take a look at Low Tone and Toilet Training: How Can Your Child’s Therapists Help You ?,  Is Your Constipated Toddler Also Having Bladder Accidents? Here Are Three Possible Reasons Why  and Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child?

If your child has mastered the potty seat but isn’t ready for the “big time”, read Low Tone and Toilet Training: Using The Adult Toilet for two pieces of equipment that can raise their game, and a few other strategies to help them make the switch to using an adult toilet.

I am so excited to offer parents a comprehensive manual that prepares them well and explains so many of the confusing situations that they encounter.  Don’t be afraid to train….be prepared!  Learn more how my e-book can help you make changes in your child’s skills today by reading The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Help Has Arrived!

Here’s what parents are saying about The Practical Guide”:

The Practical Guide has truly been heaven sent!  Although my globally delayed 5-year old daughter understood the idea of toileting, this skill was certainly not mastered.  Our consultations with Cathy and her guide on how to toilet train have given me the knowledge I’ve needed to understand low tone as a symptom that can be tackled.  Morgan has made visible advances, and I am so encouraged and empowered because I know what piece we need to work on next.  Thank you, Cathy, for writing this book!”      Trish C, mother of Morgan, 5 years old

“I would often say to myself “Cathy has to put all of her accumulated wisdom down into a book”.  I am happy to say-here it is!  You will find no one with more creative and practical  solutions.  Her insights and ideas get the job done!”     Laura D. H., mother of M., 4 years old 

Cathy has been a “go-to’ in every area imaginable, from professional referrals to toilet training.  I can’t say enough positive things about her.  She has been so insightful and helpful on this journey.”  Colleen S. mother of two special needs children

How do you buy my book?  Three ways:  Visit my website tranquil babies, Buy it on Amazon.com, or visit your therapy source, a wonderful site for parents and therapists.

 

For even more support with your toddler, visit my website tranquil babies and speak with me directly by purchasing a phone/video consultation.  You will be able to ask your specific questions and get up-to-date equipment recommendations and more!

tai-jyun-chang-270109