Tag Archives: hypermobility and positioning

Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way

david-deleon-307202

Hypermobile children end up in some impressively awkward positions.  It can feel uncomfortable just to look at the way their arms or legs are bent.   It can be an awkward position with any part of the body; shoulders that allow an arm to fold under the body and the child lies on top of the arm, crawling on the backs of the hands instead of the palms, standing on the sides of the feet, not the soles.

The mom of a child I currently treat told me that this topic is frequently appearing on her online parent’s group.  Mostly innocent questions of “Does your child do this too?”  and responses like “At least she is finally moving on her own”  When I met her child, she was rolling her head backward to such a degree that it was clearly a risk to her cervical (neck) spine.  We gradually decreased, and have almost eliminated, this behavior.  This child is now using it to get attention when she is frustrated, not to explore movement or propel herself around the room.

Because of their extreme flexibility and the additional gradual stretching effects of these positions, most children will not register or report pain in these positions.  Those of us with typical levels of flexibility can’t quite imagine that they aren’t in pain.  Unfortunately, because of their decreased proprioception Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children and decreased sense of stability, many hypermobile kids will intentionally get into these awkward postures as they seek more sensory input.  It can actually feel good to them to feel something!

The fact that your child isn’t in pain at the moment doesn’t mean that there isn’t damage occurring as you watch them contort their bodies, but the underlying inflammation and injury may only be perceived later, and sometimes not for years.  Possibly not until tissue is seriously damaged, or a joint structure is injured.  Nobody wants that to happen. Read   Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing.  If you think that there is a chance that your child is more than just loose-limbed, ask your therapist to read Could Your Pediatric Therapy Patient Have a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue? and get their opinion on whether to pursue more evaluations.  Some causes of hypermobility have effects on other parts of the body.  An informed parent is the best defense.

Here is what you can do about all those awkward postures:

  • Discuss this behavior with your OT or PT, or with both of them.  If they haven’t seen a particular behavior, take a photo or video on your phone.
  • Your professional team should be able to explain the risks, and help you come up with a plan.  For the child I mentioned above, we placed her on a cushion in a position where she could not initiate this extreme cervical hyperextension.  Then we used Dr. Harvey Karp’s “kind ignoring” strategy.  We turned away from her for a few seconds, and as soon as she stopped fussing, we offered a smile and a fun activity.  After a few tries, she got the message and the fussing was only seconds.  And it happens very infrequently now, not multiple times per day.
  • Inform everyone that cares for your child about your plan to respond to these behaviors, to ensure consistency.  Even nonverbal children learn routines and read body language.  Just one adult who ignores the behavior will make getting rid of a behavior much, much harder.
  • Find out as much as you can about safe positioning and movement.  Your therapists are experts in this area.  Their ideas may not be complicated, and they will have practical suggestions for you.  I will admit that not all therapists will approach you on this subject.  You may have to initiate this discussion and request their help.  There are posts on this blog that could help you start a conversation.  Read Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) and Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers  and How To Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit”.  Educate yourself so that you know how to respond when your child develops a new movement pattern that creates a new risk.  Kids are creative, but proactive parents can respond effectively!!

Looking for more information on hypermobility?

I wrote 2 e-books for you!

My first, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is your guide to helping your child develop independence and safety from birth through age 5.  Filled with practical strategies to help parents understand the complexities of hypermobility, it empowers parents every step of the way.  In addition to addressing all the basic self-care skills kids need to learn, it covers selecting chairs, trikes, even pajamas!  There are checklists for potty training and forms that parents can use to help communicate with teachers, therapists, family members…even doctors!

“Dr. Google” isn’t helping parents figure out how to help their kiss with PWS, SPD, ASD, Down syndrome, and all the other diagnoses that result in significant joint hypermobility.  This is the book that provides real answers in everyday language, not medical jargon.

Read more about this book, and get a peek at part of chapter 3 on positioning for success by reading The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

This unique e-book is available on Amazon as a read-only download or on Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download.  Feel more empowered and confident as a parent…today!

Is Your Hypermobile Child Older Than 5?  This is the E-book for You!

The jointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume Two: The School Years is a larger, more comprehensive book that helps the parents and therapists of older children ages 6-12 navigate school needs, build full ADL independence, and increase safety in all areas of life, including sports participation.  Need to know how to pick the right chair, desk, sport, even musical instrument?  Got it.  Want to feel empowered, not aggravated, at medical appointments?  Got that too!  There are forms and checklists that parents can use to improve school meetings and therapists can use for home programs and professional presentations.  Read more about it here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

Get my newest book today on  Amazon .  Don’t have a Kindle?  Don’t worry:  Amazon has an easy method to load it onto your iPhone or iPad!

  • joshua-coleman-655076-unsplash

Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers

jeremy-paige-146338-unsplashWhether you live in the city or the ‘burbs, you almost certainly use a stroller for your infant or toddler.  Even parents who use slings or carriers for “baby wearing”  find themselves needing a stroller at some point.  Why are strollers a problem for children with low muscle tone?  The answer is simple:  sling seats and ineffective safety straps.

The Challenges of a Sling Seat:

Strollers, especially the umbrella strollers that fold up into slim spaces, have a sling seat, not a flat and firm seat.  Like a hammock or a folding lawn chair, these seats won’t give a child a solid surface that activates their trunk.  When a child sits in a sling seat, they have to work harder to hold their body in a centered and stable position.

Why is that important when you are transporting your child in a stroller?

Because without a stable and active core, your child will have to work harder to speak and look around.  A child with low muscle tone or hypermobility that is in a sling seat may be inclined to be less active and involved, even fatigued from all that work to stay stable.  It could appear that they are shy or uninterested, but they might be at a physical disadvantage instead.  A collapsed posture also encourages compensations like tilting the head and rounding the back.  Will it cause torticollis or scoliosis?  Probably not, but it is certainly going to encourage a child to fall into those asymmetrical patterns.  Kids with low tone don’t need any help to learn bad habits of movement and positioning.

Safety strap location and use in many strollers is less than optimal.  

There are usually hip and chest straps on a stroller.  Some parents opt to keep them loose or not use them at all, thinking that kids are being unnecessarily restrained.  I think this is a mistake for kids with low tone.

Good support at the hips is essential when a child with low tone sits in a sling seat.  It is their best chance to be given some support.  Chest straps are often not adjusted as the child grows.  I see two patterns:  Straps too low for an older child, and straps too high for a younger one.  The latter issue usually occurs when parents never adjusted the straps after purchase.  They left them in the position they were in from the factory.  Make sure that the straps are tight enough to give support but not so tight that a child is unable to move at all.  A child that is used to sliding forward may complain about having their hips secured so that they can’t slouch, but they will get used to it.

You may have to reposition a child with low tone from time to time as you go about your errands or adventures.  They often don’t have the strength or body awareness to do so themselves.  They could be in a very awkward position and not complain at all.  Check their sitting position as you stroll along.  Good positioning isn’t “one and done” with these kids, but doing it right will benefit them while they are in the stroller, and also when they get out!

Think about your high chair as well.  Read How To Pick A High Chair For Your Special Needs Child and A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair.

Looking for more information that could make things easier for your child and for yourself?

I wrote an e-book for you!

The JointSmart Child: Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is finally available!

Filled with more information on seating and positioning, how to select the right high chair, and how to help your child learn to get dressed and use a spoon or fork, it is the manual that parents have been looking for!  There are even chapters on how to improve connection and communication with family, your child’s siblings, teachers, and doctors.  Parents who know what to do and what questions to ask feel confident and empowered.

This unique book is available as a printable and click-able download at Your Therapy Source and as a read-only digital download on Amazon.com

Is your back killing you every time you lift your child out of their stroller or crib?

Parents of children with special needs often neglect their own bodies in service of their children.  This is a shame because there are things you can do to protect your body and make your life easier while caring for your child.  Read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child and Universal Design For Parents of Special Needs Kids: It’s Important for You Too!.

pan-xiaozhen-272911-unsplash

The Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!

 

 

 

Finding a good chair for your special needs toddler isn’t easy.  Those cute table-and-chair sets from IKEA and Pottery Barn are made for older kids.  Sometimes much older, like the size of kids in kindergarten.  Even a larger child with motor or sensory issues will often fall right off those standard chairs!

Should you use a low bench or a chair?

I am a big fan of the Baby Bjorn footstool for bench sitting in therapy, but without a back, many toddlers don’t sit for very long without an adult to sit with them.  Independent sitting and playing is important to develop motor and cognitive skills.   The cute little toddler armchairs that you can get with their name embroidered on the backrest look great, but kids with sensory or motor issues end up in all sorts of awkward positions in them.  Those chairs aren’t a good choice for any hypermobile child or children with spasticity.

Enter the cube chair.  It has so many great features, I thought I would list them for you:

  • Made of plastic, it is relatively lightweight and easy to clean.  While not non-slip, there is a slight texture on the surface that helps objects grip a little.  Add some dycem or another non-slip surface, and you are all set.
  • Cube chairs can be a safe choice for “clumsy” kids. Kids fall. It happens to all of them.  The design makes it very stable, so it is harder to tip over. The rounded edges are safer than the sharp wooden corners on standard activity tables.
  • It isn’t very expensive.  Easily found on special needs sites, it is affordable and durable.
  • A cube chair is also a TABLE! That’s right; turn it over, and it is now a square table that doesn’t tip over easily when your toddler leans on it.
  • Get two:  now you have a chair and table set!  Or use them pushed together as a larger table or a stable surface for your child to cruise around to practice walking.  That texture will help them maintain their grip.  The chairs can stack for storage, but you really will be using them all the time.  You won’t be storing them.
  • It has two seat heights.  Look at the photos above:  when your child is younger, use the lower seat with a higher back and sides for support and safety.   When your child gets taller, use the other side for a slightly higher seat with less back support.
  • The cube chair is quite stable for kids that need to hold onto armrests to get in and out of a chair.  The truly therapeutic chairs, such as the Rifton line, are the ultimate in stability, but they are very expensive, very heavy, and made of solid wood.  They are often rejected by kids and families for their institutional look.  If you can use a cube chair, everyone will be happier.

Which kids don’t do well with these chairs?  

Children who use cube chairs have to be able to sit without assistance and actively use their hip and thigh muscles to stabilize their feet on the floor.  Kids with such significant trunk instability that they need a pelvic “seatbelt” and/or lateral supports won’t do well with this chair.  A cube chair isn’t going to give them enough postural support. If you aren’t sure if your child has these skills, ask your occupational or physical therapist.  They could save you money and time by giving you more specific seating recommendations for your child.

Your child may be too small or too large for a cube chair.  Kids who were born prematurely often remain smaller and shorter for the first years, and a child needs to be at least 28-30 inches tall (71-76 cm) to sit well in a cube chair without padding.

You may add a firm foam wedge to activate trunk muscles if they can use one and still maintain their posture in this chair, or use the Stokke-style chair (A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair ) or the Rifton chair until your child has developed enough control to take advantage of a cube chair.  If your child sits on the floor but uses a “W-sitting” pattern, learn about alternatives in Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) .

Looking for more information on positioning and play?  Check out Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With StrollersFor Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance .

And of course…my NEW e-book!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One The Early Years is now available on Amazon.com  as a read-only download and at Your Therapy Source as a clickable and printable download.

It has an entire chapter on seating and positioning for ages 0-5, and so much more.  Chapters on how to carry and hold a child, how to build safety at home and in the community, and how to talk with your family, teachers, friends and even your doctor about your child’s needs!  Read more here: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children (and Their Therapists) Finally Get Their Empowerment Manual!

 

Worried about toilet training?  I wrote the e-book you are looking for!  

Read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! to learn why my book will help you more than a generalized special needs toileting book.  OK, I’ll tell you:  you learn why low tone makes thing harder, and why doing pre-training is like investing money for retirement.  It pays off in the long run!  Loaded with checklists and quick reference summaries made for busy parents, this book is filled with things you can start using immediately, even if your child isn’t close to independence.