Tag Archives: homeschooling

Teach Kids How to Cut With Scissors…The Easy Way

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terrific safe scissors for little hands!

As a pediatric occupational therapist, scissor use is something I assess but also something I teach.  And I teach it early.  I also teach safety early, and teach it with a focus on early success.

What makes it easier to teach children to cut with scissors?

  1. Good timing.  Typically-developing children have the visual-motor skills to start snipping with scissors at 24 months.  YUP; that early.  What they don’t have is safety awareness and the ability to select what they should be using.  To teach scissor skills this early, you have to know about fine motor development, child behavior, learning skills, and have access to the right tools.  If a child is unable to attend to your demonstration, unwilling to tolerate assistance of any kind, or unable to use both hands at midline, then 24 months of age is too soon.
  2. Good tools.  My long-time readers know that I use only one type of scissor until a child is 4 or 5:  Lakeshore Scissors for Toddlers That Only Cut the Paper, Not the Toddler  Nothing derails training like needing a bandage!  In addition to the right scissors, beginning to cut is helped when the paper is a bit stiff.  The cheap printer paper most teachers and even therapists use to make copies of cutting sheets is difficult to cut.  We don’t experience it as difficult, because adults have better graded grasp.  We can control the scissor more easily as well.  Young children do much better with card stock or at least high-quality printer paper.  Try getting the administration to pay for it, though.  But if you want success, use the right tools.  My private clients learn using the Kumon “LET’s Cut Paper” series of books, or “Paper Playtime”.  Read more about these excellent books here: Kumon Learn to Cut Books: Paper Truly Worth Snipping Up   . 
  3. Good demonstration.  Some children watch every move you make.  Others are completely oblivious.  Most are somewhere in the middle.  But learning to cut isn’t intuitive.  Not any more intuitive than changing the air filter in your car is.  Could you learn to do it?  Sure, but it would really help if you could watch someone before you tried it.  I make sure that a child is able to observe me, and being that close to a scissor is another reason to use Lakeshore’s brand of safety scissor.  If a child grabs my hand or my scissor, I might not be happy about it, but the will not be injured.  If they ONLY watch me the first or second time I use a scissor in front of a child, that is just fine.  Some kids are risk-averse, and pushing them to try isn’t smart.  The next time I bring the scissors out, they may be more eager to try to use them, and they will have some information stored away about how they work.
  4. Good experiences.  Learning should be fun.  Play should be fun.  Learning to use scissors should be play, not work.  Make it fun.  I will demonstrate cutting on a page that results in something fun to play with.  The “Let’s Cut Paper” books make some cut things.  Another thing that is fun is cutting pieces of paper that fall to the table.  I am doing telehealth during the pandemic, so I am teaching parents to cut 1/2-inch strips of paper and have kids cut across the paper.  They joy in a child’s face when they snip across the strip is wonderful.  It isn’t the same as snipping on the side of the page.  You need to make it fun, or it isn’t going to work.

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Doing Preschool Camp at Home This Summer? This is the Water Table You Want!

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I just found this online after a parent asked me for recommendations for equipment.  She isn’t sending her two kids under 5 to camp this year, and needs some ideas to turn her backyard into a fun place to spend the summer.  This is the Little Tikes Magic Flower water table.

Why do I love this one?

Watch their video on Amazon and you will understand!  But before you do, here are my reasons, as an occupational therapist, for recommending this water table:

  • Multiple levels mean that children of different ages can both have fun.
  • Multiple ways to explore helps kids take turns without having to choose between “the fun thing” and the “barely OK things” on the water table.
  • The animal theme works for lots of kids.  Not everyone likes pirates.  Or even understands pirates.
  • It is big enough to have at least 2 kids playing at the same time, maybe 3.
  • They include 2 duckies (who doesn’t love duckies?), 2 frogs, 3 turtles, a fish, and three pouring choices.  I hate tables where you STILL have to go out and buy stuff to make it fun.  This table is “one-and-done”.
  •  All of my clients with low tone and hypermobility that can stand will be motivated to do so; there isn’t really any way to lean on this water table.  They can stabilize by holding an edge, but they cannot drape themselves over it.  They will be bending and reaching.  A lot.  That is a good thing.  But be mindful of the heat Helping Children With Low Muscle Tone Manage Summertime Heat
  • Kids that use a wheelchair or need to sit while playing due to mobility issues will still be able to have fun with their friends and siblings that can stand and bend.  This water table is inclusive.

I really hate sand tables.  You would think that as an OTR, I would love them.

Nope.  Sand gets everywhere.  In clothes, in body folds, everywhere.  Kids get sand in their mouth and in their eyes.  It tracks into the house unless you shower your kid outside, and maybe it will be found inside even then.  Sand is a pain in the neck.

As long as you empty your water table and hit it regularly with some soap or a diluted bleach solution to keep it clean, it is much easier on everyone to have a water table rather than a sand table.  This one is going to be a lot of fun!

Need more ideas for fun this summer?  Read The Preschool Water Arcade Game You Need This Summer If Camp is Cancelled (and maybe even if it isn’t) and Doing OT Telehealth? Start Cooking (And Baking)!

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Doing OT Telehealth? Start Cooking (And Baking)!

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Parents are looking for ways to survive the lockdown without daycare and preschool.  Even the easiest child is starting to chafe under the oppression of the COVID quarantine.  As an OT, it is my job to help parents support growth and development, but I don’t have to make it feel like work.

Enter cooking and baking as OT activities!

The simplest recipe I know has two ingredients and cannot be ruined unless you step on it:  Chocolate rolls.

You need:

  • Baking sheet, preferably non-stick or lined with parchment paper.  This dough is sticky, and the melted chips are a pain to clean off a surface.
  • Work surface: possibly another baking sheet, non-stick foil, or parchment paper.  
  • One container of crescent rolls (8 to a package, usually) Keep it cold until you are going to use it.  When it gets warm it gets very goey.  Kids either love it and mash it about, or won’t touch it.
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips, separated into two small bowls.  You will need only about 1 cup, but have extra since kids will taste a few.  Or a lot.  A mom only had a chocolate bar, and she broke it up into small pieces.  I think she needed to smash something that day!   COVID has made us adaptable….

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Unroll two triangles of dough, one for the adult, and one for the child.

Demonstrate how to gently push the chips into the dough, then roll up, starting at the wider end.  Assist your child to imitate you. Don’t over-fill with chips.   If it becomes a squishy mess when they roll it up, don’t panic.  This will bake off just fine.  I promise.

Repeat with all dough triangles.

Place both rolls on the baking sheet, and once filled, place the baking sheet on the center rack of the oven.

Bake for about 8-12 minutes or just until the bottom of the rolls turns light golden brown.  You will have to check them after 8 minutes, as they bake quickly.  They keep baking a bit after you take them out of the oven, and if you overbake, you will have 8 chocolate hockey pucks.

Cool and enjoy!

NOTES:

I ALWAYS make a recipe by myself first before baking with kids.  Why?  Two reasons:

  1. I need to know what can go wrong and how my oven responds.  Every minute counts in baking.  Kids take failure personally, so I want to make mistakes and fix them before I ask a child to try a recipe out.
  2. You have a finished product to show them.  Young children cannot look at dough and chips and imagine what it will be like when it is done.  Showing them the actual, real, tasty end product makes it understandable to them.

Is your child likely to snack on the supplies?  Use an “eating bowl”.  I often tell parents to assemble a small amount of chocolate chips in a separate bowl and designate this as an “eating bowl”.  Rather than criticize a child’s desire to sample, they can eat from this bowl without altering the amount needed for the recipe.  Even Julia Child liked to snack on her supplies!!

If you want to get fancy, you can place a few raspberries at the wide end of the dough.   Toddlers and preschoolers aren’t gourmets, and they can reject things that aren’t simple, so don’t insist that they copy you.  But this is a way to expand a child’s awareness of food variety as well as make your chocolate roll tastier.

 

 

 

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Need a Desk Chair for Your Hypermobile School-Age Child? Check out the Giantex Chair

71ASiKXBSJL._AC_SL1200_.jpgOne of my colleagues with a hypermobile third-grader told me this chair has been a great chair at school for her child.  It hits a lot of my targets for a good chair recommendation, so here it is:  The Giantex chair.

Why do I like it so much?

  • It is a bit adaptable and it is sized for kids.  No chair fits every child, but the more you can adjust a chair, the more likely you are to provide good supportive seating.  This chair is a good balance of adaptability and affordability.  My readers know I am not a fan of therapy balls as seating for homework when a child is hypermobile.  Here’s why: Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork?
  • It isn’t institutional.  Teachers, parents, and especially kids, get turned off by chairs that look like medical equipment.  This looks like a regular chair, but when adjusted correctly, it IS medical equipment, IMPO.
  • It’s affordable.  The child I described got it paid for by her school district to use in her classroom, but this chair is within the budget of some families.  They can have two; one at school and one at home for homework or meals.  Most kids aren’t too eager to use a Tripp Trapp chair after 6 or 7. That chair is a hit with many therapists, but it’s untraditional looks bother a lot of older children.  This chair isn’t going to turn them off as easily.
  • This chair looks like it would last through some growth.  I tell every parent that they only thing I can promise you is that your child will grow.  Even the kids with genetic disorders that affect growth will grow larger eventually.  This chair should fit kids from 8-12 years of age in most cases.  The really small ones or the really tall ones?  Maybe not, but the small ones will grow into it, and the tall kids probably fit into a smaller adult chair now, or in the near future.

For more helpful posts on hypermobile kids, read Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection StrategiesHow To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” and When Writing Hurts: The Hypermobile Hand.

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Want more information to help your older child and make life easier?  My newest book has finally arrived!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility  Volume Two: The School Years is now available as a read-only download on Amazon and a printable download on Your Therapy Source .  It is filled with the practical information that parents and therapists need to make kids’ lives easier, safer, and more independent.  Your Therapy Source has created book bundles, discounting all of my books when you buy more than one, making it more affordable to get the information you need.

There are extensive forms and checklists for school and home, and strategies that make immediate improvements in a child’s life.  Learn how to buy and fill a backpack that doesn’t damage a child’s joints, how blankets can create more pain and sleep problems,  and how to help a child write and keyboard with greater control.  Read more about it here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

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Is Your Toddler Home From School Because of COVID-19? Save Your Sanity With Fun Routines

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Many families have toddlers that are not attending daycare or preschool now.  They are at home.  All day.  They are off their schedules, and sometimes seem off their rockers!  Here are some ideas to help their parents retain their sanity:

  1. Create a routine for them.  This means that they get snacks at a certain time, outdoor play at a certain time, look at books, take a nap, listen to music, etc.  all in a predictable sequence.  Paint rocks, tear up scrap paper and glue it onto a bigger piece of paper, etc.  Crafts are fun and they can be cheap.  You don’t have to reproduce the school routine, you just have to be consistent about your home routine.  They will learn to anticipate what comes next, with all the calmness that consistency provides.
  2. Have some emergency items/activities.  Bake off some pre-made cookie dough, open up some new toy you saved for a special time.  It is special now!  Root through the back of the gift closet or the toy box and find something that is new or seems new.
  3. Turn on music and calm everyone down.  Music is powerful, and these days we need it.  Sing out and be silly.  You probably could blow off some steam too.  Consider using Quickshifts  Binaural Beats and Regulation: More Than Music Therapy if your child has sensory processing or low muscle tone.
  4. Make sure they get to move.  Every day.  Even if all you do is dance around the room, make it active.  Jump on pillows, log roll around safely, etc.  I treated kids in tiny NYC apartments, so I know it can be done.  It isn’t about having a lot of space.
  5. Reconsider the use of screens as rewards.  I know it works, but there is a price to pay after that initial quiet time.  Think carefully about what will happen when time is up, or when meals of bedtime come.  It could get ugly.  I have used screen activities in treatment, but NEVER EVER a reward, or even a consistent activity every session.  It is another fun thing we do that isn’t always available, and certainly not received by howling for it.  For apps that teach instead of entertain, read Screen Time for Preschoolers? If You Choose to Offer Screen Time, Make it Count With These Apps

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Is Automaticity The Key To Handwriting Success?

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I know that this is a bold statement.  Handwriting is a complex skill, with visual-motor coordination, perceptual, cognitive and postural components.  But when I evaluate a child’s writing, and I watch them having to think about where to start and sequence movements to form a letter and place it on a line, and then decide how far apart the letters and words should be, it makes me think that the lack of automaticity is often a child’s biggest hurdle.  Even if their motor control isn’t terrific, they can still have legible and functional writing if they make fewer errors and write fast enough to complete their work in a reasonable amount of time.  Slow and labored writing isn’t functional, even if it is beautiful.

Think about how important it is for any visual-motor skill to become automatic in order to be efficient.   You cannot hit that ball if you have to think about it.  You just can’t.  It has to be a smooth and automatic response that comes from practice and refined feedback loops developed by experience.  While practicing, professional athletes drill down on minute aspects of the swing, but during the game, they choke if they “overthink”.  Ask anyone who has done a ton of free-throws in basketball (you get an unimpeded chance to drop that orange ball into the hoop) for practice but cannot make it when the game is on the line.

In this current culture, teachers have so many skills to impart.  Handwriting is still a skill children need.  Paper workbooks and worksheets are still used extensively until 3rd or 4th grade.  You cannot wait it out until kids get old enough to keyboard.  And a struggling writer in second grade is already feeling bad about their abilities. Sometimes so bad that they don’t want to do the language arts work that develops spelling, vocabulary and creative expression.   So waiting until they can type isn’t the answer.  You want excitement and enthusiasm for reading and writing early on.  Nothing develops excitement like success.  Nothing kills enthusiasm like boredom and failure.

If automaticity is the key to handwriting success, how do you develop it in children?  I think the folks at Handwriting Without Tears have figured it out.  I no longer use any other handwriting materials.  Their workbooks and pre-K multi-sensory learning tools are just too good.

  1. If you look at the pre-K and early primary workbooks carefully, you will see that the left-to-right, top-to-bottom orientation is embedded in everything.  Even the cute animals for little kids to color are all facing left-to-right!
  2. The two lines (baseline and midline) are simple to use.  No wondering where to place letters.   The pre-K letters are at the bottom of the page, creating an emerging automatic sense of baseline.
  3. The developmental progression (versus the alphabetical progression) builds slowly from vertical and horizontal lines to curves and diagonal lines.  Letters are grouped by the way they are formed, making automatic movements emerge early and consistently.
  4. Workbook pages aren’t overwhelming with activities, but the skills are repeated to intentionally develop writing automaticity.

For example, instead of writing 12 letter”B”s and 12 letter “b”s,  uppercase letters, with their larger and simpler hand movements are taught together and earlier.  Letters “b” and “d” aren’t taught together since they can easily be reversed.  Letters “b” and “h” are taught together since the formation is very similar.  Fewer reversals, more success without having to go back and re-teach letter formation.

Take a look at the best “pre-K into K” book I have ever seen, HWT’s KickStart Kindergarten.  It is the perfect summer bridge activity for your preschooler or your older special needs child.

Happy summer writing!

 

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Homeschooling? Make Learning to Write Easy for Everyone

Handwriting is a skill that powers the development of language and literacy, as well as math skills.  This is an important early foundation skill.  Keyboarding does not replace writing at any age.  If you doubt me, gather up all your pencils and pens for a day or two.  See what happens.

If they are truthful, most early education teachers will tell you that they received very little training in how to teach young children to write.  They are using the curricula that their principal or lead teacher has chosen.  It usually has not been chosen because those professionals have actually used it successfully.  Often it is a district-wide decision and teachers may not even be trained in the basics of using the program, let alone the principles of teaching any handwriting curricula to typically-developing children.

Luckily, my favorite handwriting curriculum is easy for parents to use when they homeschool.  This will be one of those situations where your children’s skills will almost immediately exceed their public school peers, and stay that way through the years.  Even if your child has learning differences.

Handwriting Without Tears is an affordable program, has easy-to-understand parent/teacher guides, and multi sensory activities that engage young children right away.  The materials for cursive and above are not insulting to the older child that needs review and support.  Most importantly, if your child has learning differences, your child can use this program successfully because the materials support children of all stripes.

HWT provides pre-writing materials like wood pieces and Mat Man that are fun for 4’s or older kids working at that level.  Their workbooks are simple and uncluttered for kids with visual-perceptual issues, and the teaching progression is developmental, not alphabetical.  Kids that have motor issues will be supported to build control before they have to work on the tricky diagonals or curves of the letters “A” and “B”.  You can still teach phonics and any other literacy program that you desire.  HWT allows you to teach writing and reading separately or together.  You get to decide.

Kids on the spectrum are often literal thinkers, and get overwhelmed with complex teaching language.  You will be using repetition and routine with this curriculum, helping them learn by supporting their strengths and their desire to have structure and familiarity.  This will not slow down a sibling that isn’t on the spectrum.  That child will simply sail ahead!  The ultimate goal of handwriting instruction is simple:  legible automatic handwriting.  For all the excitement about spontaneous and free writing for literacy in kindergarten, if your child is constantly erasing errors in first and second grade, he or she will start to write less and less.  Making too many mistakes will reduce creativity and writing output.

The program is also written in Spanish and French, which may be helpful for children learning English or desirable for families that want a multicultural curriculum.  Same excellent and easy-to-teach format.

Visit their website, where you can download some free samples and try them for yourself.  Homeschooling requires parents to make many decisions, but this is one choice that makes things easier.