Tag Archives: chairs and tables for hypermobility

How To Improve Posture In Children With Low Muscle Tone… Without a Fight!

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With pediatric occupational therapy going on at home using parents as surrogate therapists, it isn’t helpful to ask a parent to do too much repositioning of children with low tone.  First of all, kids don’t like it.  Second, kids really don’t like it.

I have never met a child that enjoys therapeutic handling, no matter how skilled I am, and I don’t think I ever will.  They don’t know why we are placing their hands or legs somewhere, and they tend not to like to be told what to do and how to do it.  The best you can hope for at times is that they tolerate it and learn that therapists are going to be helping them do what they want to do For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

Leaving a child in an awkward and unstable position isn’t the right choice either.  They are going to struggle more and fail more when out of alignment and unsteady.  If you know this is going to happen, you can’t let them stay that way because you also know that this will blow back in your face in the form of frustration, short attention span, and children developing a sense that whatever they are doing or whomever they are doing it with is a drag.  A real drag.

So how can you improve the posture of a child with low tone without forcing them physically into a better position?

  • Use good seating and other equipment that facilitates postural control.  A chair that is too small, a slippery floor and footie pajamas….try not to make stabilization too hard unless you are a licensed therapist and you know how to juggle all the variables.  If you are a parent, ask your child’s therapist what kind of seating, tables, ride-on toys, etc are the right ones.  Don’t think your therapist knows what you need?  My e-books can help you and your therapist because they have guidelines and checklists to learn about selecting all of these things.  They are part of The JointSmart Child series! Read more here The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!   and here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!
  • Respect fatigue.  A mom told me today that her daughter’s telehealth PT sessions end in tears at least half the time due to exhaustion.  That is simply unacceptable.  Great therapists don’t leave kids that upset for parents to deal with after the session.  They taper the session demands, and end on a good note.  There are always other positions to play in or other things to do when a child has fatigued postural muscles.  You know they are fried because if you present them with a fun activity and they simply cannot manage it, you aren’t being played.  They are tired.
  • Create routines that incorporate postural control.  My little clients over 2 know that their non-dominant hand had a job to do and what it is.  They know that we place feet in a certain way, and that specific games call for specific positions.  When good posture is a habit, there fights are fewer going forward.  They know what to do and what I expect and I know that they will be successful if they follow our routines.  Read How To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” and Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way for more information on this subject.

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The Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!

 

 

 

Finding a good chair for your special needs toddler isn’t easy.  Those cute table-and-chair sets from IKEA and Pottery Barn are made for older kids.  Sometimes much older, like the size of kids in kindergarten.  Even a larger child with motor or sensory issues will often fall right off those standard chairs!

Should you use a low bench or a chair?

I am a big fan of the Baby Bjorn footstool for bench sitting in therapy, but without a back, many toddlers don’t sit for very long without an adult to sit with them.  Independent sitting and playing is important to develop motor and cognitive skills.   The cute little toddler armchairs that you can get with their name embroidered on the backrest look great, but kids with sensory or motor issues end up in all sorts of awkward positions in them.  Those chairs aren’t a good choice for any hypermobile child or children with spasticity.

Enter the cube chair.  It has so many great features, I thought I would list them for you:

  • Made of plastic, it is relatively lightweight and easy to clean.  While not non-slip, there is a slight texture on the surface that helps objects grip a little.  Add some dycem or another non-slip surface, and you are all set.
  • Cube chairs can be a safe choice for “clumsy” kids. Kids fall. It happens to all of them.  The design makes it very stable, so it is harder to tip over. The rounded edges are safer than the sharp wooden corners on standard activity tables.
  • It isn’t very expensive.  Easily found on special needs sites, it is affordable and durable.
  • A cube chair is also a TABLE! That’s right; turn it over, and it is now a square table that doesn’t tip over easily when your toddler leans on it.
  • Get two:  now you have a chair and table set!  Or use them pushed together as a larger table or a stable surface for your child to cruise around to practice walking.  That texture will help them maintain their grip.  The chairs can stack for storage, but you really will be using them all the time.  You won’t be storing them.
  • It has two seat heights.  Look at the photos above:  when your child is younger, use the lower seat with a higher back and sides for support and safety.   When your child gets taller, use the other side for a slightly higher seat with less back support.
  • The cube chair is quite stable for kids that need to hold onto armrests to get in and out of a chair.  The truly therapeutic chairs, such as the Rifton line, are the ultimate in stability, but they are very expensive, very heavy, and made of solid wood.  They are often rejected by kids and families for their institutional look.  If you can use a cube chair, everyone will be happier.

Which kids don’t do well with these chairs?  

Children who use cube chairs have to be able to sit without assistance and actively use their hip and thigh muscles to stabilize their feet on the floor.  Kids with such significant trunk instability that they need a pelvic “seatbelt” and/or lateral supports won’t do well with this chair.  A cube chair isn’t going to give them enough postural support. If you aren’t sure if your child has these skills, ask your occupational or physical therapist.  They could save you money and time by giving you more specific seating recommendations for your child.

Your child may be too small or too large for a cube chair.  Kids who were born prematurely often remain smaller and shorter for the first years, and a child needs to be at least 28-30 inches tall (71-76 cm) to sit well in a cube chair without padding.

You may add a firm foam wedge to activate trunk muscles if they can use one and still maintain their posture in this chair, or use the Stokke-style chair (A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair ) or the Rifton chair until your child has developed enough control to take advantage of a cube chair.  If your child sits on the floor but uses a “W-sitting” pattern, learn about alternatives in Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) .

Looking for more information on positioning and play?  Check out Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With StrollersFor Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance .

And of course…my NEW e-book!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One The Early Years is now available on Amazon.com  as a read-only download and at Your Therapy Source as a clickable and printable download.

It has an entire chapter on seating and positioning for ages 0-5, and so much more.  Chapters on how to carry and hold a child, how to build safety at home and in the community, and how to talk with your family, teachers, friends and even your doctor about your child’s needs!  Read more here: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children (and Their Therapists) Finally Get Their Empowerment Manual!

 

Worried about toilet training?  I wrote the e-book you are looking for!  

Read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! to learn why my book will help you more than a generalized special needs toileting book.  OK, I’ll tell you:  you learn why low tone makes thing harder, and why doing pre-training is like investing money for retirement.  It pays off in the long run!  Loaded with checklists and quick reference summaries made for busy parents, this book is filled with things you can start using immediately, even if your child isn’t close to independence.