Category Archives: toy/equipment review

Need a Desk Chair for Your Hypermobile School-Age Child? Check out the Giantex Chair

 

71ASiKXBSJL._AC_SL1200_.jpgOne of my colleagues with a hypermobile third-grader told me this chair has been a great chair at school for her child.  It hits a lot of my targets for a chair recommendation, so here it is:  The Giantex chair.

Why do I like it so much?

  • It is a bit adaptable and sized for kids.  No chair fits every child, but the more you can adjust a chair, the more likely you are to provide good supportive seating.  This chair is a good balance of adaptability and affordability.  My readers know I am not a fan of therapy balls as seating for homework.  Here’s why: Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork?
  • It isn’t institutional.  Teachers, parents, and especially kids, get turned off by chairs that look like medical equipment.  This looks like a regular chair, but when adjusted correctly, it IS medical equipment, IMPO.
  • It’s affordable.  The child I described got it paid for by her school district to use in her classroom, but this chair is within the budget of some families.  They can have one at home for homework or meals.  Most kids aren’t too eager to use a Tripp Trapp chair after 6 or 7.  It’s untraditional looks bother them.  This chair isn’t going to turn them off as easily.
  • This chair looks like it would last through some growth.  I tell every parent that they only thing I can promise you is that your child will grow.  Even the kids with genetic disorders that affect growth will grow larger eventually.  This chair should fit kids from 8-12 years of age in most cases.  The really small ones or the really tall ones?  Maybe not, but the small ones will grow into it, and the tall kids probably fit into a smaller adult chair now or in the near future.

For more helpful posts on hypermobile kids, read Joint Protection And Hypermobility: Investing in Your Child’s FutureHow To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit” and When Writing Hurts: The Hypermobile Hand.

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Stress Relief in the Time of Coronavirus: Enter Quickshifts

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My clients know that I use therapeutic music called Quickshifts and Gearshifters in many pediatric therapy sessions.  They use binaural beat technology (Binaural Beats and Regulation: More Than Music Therapy ) to induce an alpha brainwave state.  This is the brain’s calm-alert state.  Due to the unprecedented stress we are all under, I am using them myself.  Every day, twice a day minimum.  Here is why:

  1. I am no good to anyone if I am vibrating with anxiety.  There is only so much breath work can do for me.  I need brain work.
  2. The calm-alert brainwave state that Quickshifts and Gearshifters rapidly induces is effortless.  Turn it on, (they can be purchased and loaded onto your phone through the free Therapeutic Listening app) wear the headphones, and it works perfectly without me doing anything else.  I do have to stay off the screen stuff, but then, I should anyway.  Mostly I take a walk (alone) or crochet.
  3. I love music.  Most of us do.  I need music.  Most of us do.  I won’t listen to some droning boring sounds if I can listen to fun music instead.  Quickshifts have children’s music, classical music and gentle techno music that isn’t aggravatingly boring.
  4. The effects of altering brainwave states boost my immunity.  And there has never been a better time for it.
  5. I can bring it with me on a walk, so I get a double dose of healthy input.
  6. It isn’t tiring or distracting.
  7. I could use it more often than 2x/day.  There is no danger or downside, unlike modulated music.  Modulated music is a workout for your brain, and using it too close to bedtime can be a challenge.   Quickshifts and Gearshifters are designed for anxiety and even trauma recovery.  This pandemic is a trauma if I ever saw one.
  8. I can use it alone at home.  No one is getting massages, going to psychotherapy, or getting acupuncture.  There is no neurofeedback machine in my house.  I couldn’t go anywhere even if I wanted to.  Enter Quickshifts.

Quickshifts and Gearshifters are best used when selected for a client by a trained OTR.  Listening to the wrong album will not damage you or your child, but it is a waste of money and time.  Two things most of us are running out of right now.  

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Think Using Dot Markers Is Therapy for Kids in Preschool? Think Again!

 

S495361_2I had to look twice.  A private client showed me the picture her 4 year-old made in his school OT session (not the picture above!).  A picture decorated using a dot marker.  He can copy a vertical cross and a circle using a pencil.  I showed him how to draw a triangle in less than 4 minutes during that session.  He is very risk-averse and is probably intellectually gifted.   He has lots of sensory issues and mildly limited fine motor skills.

Why was he using a dot marker for anything?

I know his therapist isn’t very experienced, and I am sure the supplies budget isn’t huge.  But neither are good excuses for using tools that don’t raise the skill level of a child that is so hesitant to be challenged.  Those markers are great for toddlers under 2 or older children with motor skills under a 24-month level, especially kids with neurological or orthopedic issues that don’t allow them to easily grasp and control crayons.  Dot markers get children excited to make a mark on paper (an 11-month fine motor skill) and can be the first step to holding a tool to develop early pre-writing.

They aren’t good at all to develop any kind of mature pencil grasp due to their large diameter and large tip.  It would be like writing your name with a broom!

The ink tends to splatter with heavy quick contact with paper (fun to make a mess, but not therapeutic!), and doesn’t dry quickly enough.  Repeated contact bleeds colors together, and it is hard to keep within the borders of a design unless the target is very large.  I can assure you that the design above was done by an adult, an adult with some art training.

Dot markers aren’t building pre-writing skills for this child I treat.  There are so many options for activities that do build skills in kids at his ability level.  Their use can discourage a risk-averse child from working on pencil grasp.  Whatever the activity it was that they were doing, unless he was swinging on his belly on a platform swing or going down a ramp on a scooter (I don’t think he was doing anything nearly that intense) while using a dot marker, there were other, better choices to make.

Read Using A Vertical Easel in Preschool? WHERE You Draw on it Matters! and Deluxe Water Wow Pads Offer More Challenge And More Fun To Preschoolers and Kindergarteners for more good ideas on fun at home that builds pre-writing skills.

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Binaural Beats and Regulation: More Than Music Therapy

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When you have so much to choose from, how do you pick the right one?

For people who have read about or tried Quickshifts  Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about listening on headphones versus speakers, and why the music has that echo-y tone.

The use of binaural headphones or speakers placed close to the child allows the ears to hear the full range of sound with as little interference or absorption from the environment.  It is important that the left and right ear are hearing the sounds separately.  The echo-y sound?  What you are hearing is the BBT; binaural beat technology.  The slight alteration in sound frequency between what the brain hears from the left and right speakers forces it to synch up at a frequency that matches to level of difference.

It isn’t new.  BBT has been used and researched since the 70’s.  It is out there in many forms; you can even find it on YouTube.  There are enough studies done to prove that this technology has real effects on alertness, attention and mood.  It makes sense that therapists would like to use it to help kids with self-regulation issues.  BBT is helpful for learning and self-regulation, but only if you know what brainwave state you want, and why you want it.  And that is where skilled therapists can help.

But which one to use?

 I only use Quickshifts in my therapy sessions.

 

Why do I prefer Quickshifts to deliver BBT?

  • Quickshifts entrain an alpha brainwave state.  This state is associated with calm focus the ability to move to a more powerful focus or downshift into sleep, and, wait for it, interoception.  Yup, the biggest new word in occupational therapy is interoception, and there are some excellent studies done by neuropsych researchers that indicate that alpha brainwave states increase interoception.  Yeah!  Interoception is the ability to perceive internal states, and this includes basic physiological states such as fatigue, hunger, and the need to eliminate.  So many of our clients struggle with knowing what they feel.  Quickshifts can help.
  • Alpha brainwave states are theorized to act as a gating mechanism for anxiety, which means they help kids block anxiety.  Anxiety isn’t a great state for kids with ASD, SPD, or any of us.  Anxiety is a component of so many diagnoses, and it isn’t easy to do cognitive behavioral strategies like CBT or DBT with children under 10 or 11.  Quickshifts also work well for adults with anxiety as well! Should the PARENTS of Kids With Sensory Issues Use Quickshifts?
  • The music used in Quickshifts is very carefully designed to enhance specific functional states, and every occupational therapist is all about functional performance.  We don’t want just relaxation; we want engagement in life.  The way that Quickshifts uses music allows BBT to address specific behavioral performance abilities.  There are albums for attention, for movement, and for regulation.  They all use BBT.  For each particular album, one functional goal will predominate.  I don’t need to induce a meditative state in a child that is working on handwriting.  I need calm focus and better movement control.
  • The avoidance of pure tones means I don’t have to worry about seizure activity in kids with a seizure disorder.  The use of pure tones is a risk for seizures, so if a child has frequent seizures, I can be confident that I am not increasing them with this treatment.
  • The choice of instrumentation on Quickshifts albums is often more grounding than other BBT choices.  I want kids to feel grounded, not floating on a cloud.  That state makes it harder to pay attention, to speak, move, etc.  Being jolted into a high level of engagement without grounding isn’t great either.  Remember:  OT is all about functioning.  This happens at that “just right” point of arousal.
  • There is a progression of instrumentation and rhythm on many Quickshift albums that guides the brain into more environmental awareness and postural activation, but it is done gently.   Getting to an alpha state is a goal, but improving functional performance with less risk of overload is most important to me.  I have to give kids the ability to leave our session in a great state of mind.
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He picked out his perfect pumpkin!

Pillowfort at Target: Should You Ask Your OT Before You Click “Buy”?

 

There are so many families out there that need great equipment for their sensory kids.  Pillowfort materials are on sale at Target, one of my favorite big box stores.  The items are affordable and stylish.  But are they what you really need?  In order to get the products that serve your child’s needs, you may want to think beyond color and style.  The key to good equipment is having a big picture plan.  The wrong item for the wrong kid is worse than not hitting “send”.

Some good examples are their crash pad and their chair.  If you have a sensory-seeking kid, you know what abuse your couch and bed can take.  Kids tend to dive bomb them and little by little, destroy them.  Pillowfort will sell you a nice crash pad, and they use a smiling child lying prone on one of their pads in their display on Target.com.

You might want to look at the dimensions.  In my professional experience, most of my clients are looking for way more square footage to crash into.  And when they are dysregulated, which is often, they aren’t going to be able to land squarely on such a small pad.  Therapists use pad the size of a thick full mattress for a reason.  We are all safety, all the time.  And we know what works.

The rocking desk chair is another nice chair that will serve a small number of kids.  It looks pretty sturdy, but the big sensory seekers can wear out hinges really easily.  A chair that rocks is a chair that can become tippy with the right (or wrong) user.  Choose this chair only if you have a child that isn’t one of THOSE kids.

There are other choices for kids that seek movement, and they aren’t chairs.  They are sensory diets, created by therapists with years of experience in evaluating and treating your child.  Read Sensory Stimulation is not Sensory Treatment and Halloween With Sensory Sensitive Kids: The (Sensory) Tricks of the Holiday for more information on how Good OT treatment can help your child.

Looking for information to help your hypermobile child with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome?

I wrote an e-book for you!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is now available on Amazon as a read-only download and at Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download!

This book answers all the questions you want to ask about finding the right high chairs, clothes, toilet seat, and even which crayons help your young hypermobile child make faster progress.  It has checklists and forms to help you communicate with your babysitters, your child’s teachers, even forms to improve your appointments with doctors.  Chapters on communication give you practical ideas to improve your family’s understanding of hypermobility and guide you to clarify what they can do to provide you with real support, not pity or denial.  Get it today, and start feeling more confident and empowered as a parent!

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Does Your Older Child Hate Writing? Try HWT’s Double-Lined Paper

 

This paper has been more useful to older kids (6+) that I see for handwriting help than any other paper on the market, and almost any other tool Problems With Handwriting? You Need The Best Eraser , Great Mechanical Pencils Can Improve Your Child’s Handwriting Skills .  Why?  Regular lined paper, and almost all worksheets, are usually jam-packed with lines.  Red lines, green lines, lines with airplanes and worms.  There are papers designed by occupational therapists that are even more complex than the mass-market choices.

All this is often visual noise to kids with sensory processing issues and ocular or visual-perceptual issues.  These problems are sometimes subtle and appear to be behavioral.  The kids who “hate to write”.  The kids who look away when you are demonstrating how to write a letter or spell a word.  The kids who cannot seem to remember where to start a letter, even after repeated practice.  These children often do much better with HWT’s double-lined paper.

Let’s drill down into the design of this unique paper:

  • Double-lined paper provides just two lines; the baseline and the midline.  Knowing where to start uppercase letters and tall lowercase letters is important, and this paper encourages practice and awareness while still giving some structure to writing.
  • There is a wide empty space between sets of lines.  This is intentional; children have room to place the tails of lowercase “y” and “j”, for example, without blocking the uppercase or tall lowercase letters of the next line of writing.  For many kids, not knowing what to do about crowding and spacing is a good reason to stop trying to write well, or sometimes even write at all.
  • This sturdy paper is pre-punched to be used in a 3-ring binder.  The quality of the paper is very high, which means that it doesn’t tear easily when a child erases a mistake.  Most schools provide the thinnest paper for teachers to use as handouts, creating the potential for a disaster when given to a child that struggles with grading their force on an eraser, or makes multiple errors in a word.
  • Brains get practice in sizing and proportion.  Once kids have a pattern of letter formation, it is easier to accomplish without the extra midline.  But so many kids need that “training wheel” effect much longer than scrolls recognize.  Many kids need a day or two of double-lined paper use to start understanding the way a letter “h” is twice as tall as a letter “a” and the same size but aligned differently than the letter “y”.  Of course, pointing it out is important, and so is working on other writing qualities such as letter and word spacing.
  • Kids write faster.  Because they are guided to proportion and start letters correctly, they don’t waste time thinking about it or erasing incorrect letters.  Again, this doesn’t mean their brain isn’t taking it all in.  If that were true, we would start every kid on single-lined paper in preschool.
  • There are three line sizes, so you don’t have to abandon the double-lines when your kid enter middle school.  I will admit that I wish the pre-k/K paper were thicker.  But it is still fairly sturdy.
  • You can alternate using this paper with single-lined paper to see when to “take the training wheels off” and stop using double-lined paper.  Kids should always have a chance to practice with standard paper, but when the choice is between fighting and crying, and quickly executing a homework assignment, it is no contest.

 

The best paper wins.

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Why Parents Used The Fisher-Price Rock and Play Sleeper: Desperation and Confusion

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As a Happiest Baby on the Block (HBOTB) educator, I was thrilled to hear about the product’s recall, and horrified at the number of deaths attributed to this device.  The media spent a lot of time pointing out that the company’s marketing included clear messaging that suggested that children could sleep in it, in defiance of the national pediatrician’s association’s recommendations that children sleep on a flat surface without padding or bedding until they are old enough to move to prevent suffocation.

Many of the stories online made it sound like the company must be out of their mind, or the parents must be idiots.  I don’t think that either thing is true.   I think I know why well-meaning parents listened to the printing on the box and not the hurried message/tri-fold handout from their child’s doctor:  they simply want some sleep.  They see how calm their child is in this device, and don’t know what else to do to get some peace and quiet.  Fisher-Price knew what I know; parents can be desperate and want a convenient solution to their struggles.  Their packaging mentioned both the warning and showed sleeping children in the device.

Babies are amazing, but babies don’t sleep through the night right away.  They often don'[t sleep through the night in the first 6 months.  That is a long time for parents to deal with their own chronic sleeplessness.  Many families are dual-earners, and many parents today are over 30.  Losing a night’s sleep at 23 and losing a night’s sleep at 39 are completely different.  One makes you sluggish.  The other makes you feel like you were hit by a truck.  Have that happen to you for a week, and you cannot handle screaming or exhaustion very well.  Really.  Do that for 6 months, and you might agree to almost anything anyone suggests to get a little more sleep.  When your child is so peaceful in that carrier or infant positioner, you may not want to risk waking them.  Do it anyway.  And learn how to get them back to sleep more easily.

One reason why I became a HBOTB educator was my sympathy for the parents I worked with as an occupational therapist.  These are kind people, intelligent people, but people who were not given great strategies by their pediatricians.  They were told what to do, but not HOW to do it.  Pediatricians aren’t given the time to walk parents through good techniques, even if they know them.  And a lot don’t know how to calm babies.  They know how to cure babies.  Dr. Karp’s techniques tell parents  how.

Since the arrival of the SNOO, things have become a bit simpler.  The need for education hasn’t ended, because unless you intend to spend the first 12 weeks at home each and every day, parents need to know how to calm their babies without a device.  Read Why You Still Need the 5S’s, Even If You Bought a SNOO   if you would like to know more about how HBOTB will save your sanity during the day.

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