Category Archives: toy/equipment review

Binaural Beats and Regulation; More Than Music Therapy

josh-wilburne-501952-unsplash

When you have so much to choose from, how do you pick the right one?

For people who have read about or tried Quickshifts  Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Processing, Attention and Postural Activation, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about listening on headphones versus speakers, and why the music has this echo-y tone to it.

The use of binaural headphones allows the ears to hear the full range of sound with as little interference or absorption from the environment.  It is important that the left and right ear are hearing the sounds separately.  The echo-y sound?  What you are hearing is the BBT; binaural beat technology.

It isn’t new.  BBT has been used and researched since the 70’s.  It is out there in many forms; you can even find it on YouTube.  There are enough studies done to prove that this technology has real effects on alertness, attention and mood.  It makes sense that therapists would like to use it to help kids with self-regulation issues.

BBT is helpful for learning and self-regulation, but only if you know what brainwave state you want, and why you want it.  And that is where therapists can help.

But which one to use?  I only use Quickshifts in my therapy sessions.  

Why do I prefer Quickshifts to deliver BBT?

  • Quickshifts entrain an alpha brainwave state.  This state is associated with calm focus and, wait for it, interoception.  Yup, the biggest new word in occupational therapy is interception, and there are some excellent studies done by neuropsych researchers that indicate that alpha brainwave states increase interoception.  Yeah!  Interoception is the ability to perceive internal states, and this includes basic physiological states such as fatigue, hunger, and the need to eliminate.  So many of our clients struggle with knowing what they feel.  Quickshifts can help.
  • Alpha brainwave states are theorized to act as a gating mechanism for anxiety, and anxiety isn’t a great state for kids with ASD, SPD, or, really, any of us.  Anxiety is a component of so many diagnoses, and it isn’t easy to do cognitive strategies like CBT or DBT with children under 10 or 11.
  • The music used in Quickshifts is very carefully designed to enhance specific functional states, and every occupational therapist is all about functional performance.  We don’t want just relaxation; we want engagement in life.  The way that Quickshifts uses music allows BBT to address specific behavioral performance abilities.  There are albums for attention, for movement, and for regulation.  They all use BBT.  At any particular time, one functional goal will predominate.  I don’t need to induce a meditative state in a child that is working on handwriting.  I need calm focus and movement control.
  • The avoidance of pure tones means I don’t have to worry about seizure activity in most kids.  If a child has frequent seizures, I can be confident that I am not increasing them.
  • The choice of instrumentation on Quickshifts albums is often more grounding than other BBT choices.  I want kids to feel grounded, not floating on a cloud.  That state makes it harder to speak, move, etc.  Being jolted into a high level of engagement without grounding isn’t great either.  Remember:  OT is all about functioning.  That happens at that “just right” point of arousal.
  • There is a progression of instrumentation and rhythm on many Quickshift albums that guides the brain into more environmental awareness and postural activation, but it is done gently.   Getting to an alpha state is a goal, but improving functional performance with less risk of overload is most important to me.  I have to give kids a chance to leave our session in a good place.
rawpixel-1054665-unsplash

He picked out his perfect pumpkin!

Pillowfort at Target: Should You Ask Your OT Before You Click Buy?

 

There are so many families out there that need great equipment for their sensory kids.  Pillowfort materials are on sale at Target, one of my favorite big box stores.  The items are affordable and stylish.  But are they what you really need?  In order to get the products that serve your child’s needs, you may want to think beyond color and style.  The key to good equipment is having a big picture plan.  The wrong item for the wrong kid is worse than not hitting “send”.

Some good examples are their crash pad and their chair.  If you have a sensory-seeking kid, you know what abuse your couch and bed can take.  Kids tend to dive bomb them and little by little, destroy them.  Pillowfort will sell you a nice crash pad, and they use a smiling child lying prone on one of their pads in their display on Target.com.

You might want to look at the dimensions.  In my professional experience, most of my clients are looking for way more square footage to crash into.  And when they are dysregulated, which is often, they aren’t going to be able to land squarely on such a small pad.  Therapists use pad the size of a thick full mattress for a reason.  We are all safety, all the time.  And we know what works.

The rocking desk chair is another nice chair that will serve a small number of kids.  It looks pretty sturdy, but the big sensory seekers can wear out hinges really easily.  A chair that rocks is a chair that can become tippy with the right (or wrong) user.  Choose this chair only if you have a child that isn’t one of THOSE kids.

There are other choices for kids that seek movement, and they aren’t chairs.  They are sensory diets, created by therapists with years of experience in evaluating and treating your child.  Read Sensory Stimulation is not Sensory Treatment and Halloween With Sensory Sensitive Kids: The (Sensory) Tricks of the Holiday for more information on how Good OT treatment can help your child.

Looking for information to help your hypermobile child with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome?

I wrote an e-book for you!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is now available on Amazon as a read-only download and at Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download!

This book answers all the questions you want to ask about finding the right high chairs, clothes, toilet seat, and even which crayons help your young hypermobile child make faster progress.  It has checklists and forms to help you communicate with your babysitters, your child’s teachers, even forms to improve your appointments with doctors.  Chapters on communication give you practical ideas to improve your family’s understanding of hypermobility and guide you to clarify what they can do to provide you with real support, not pity or denial.  Get it today, and start feeling more confident and empowered as a parent!

bonnie-kittle-144618-unsplash

Does Your Older Child Hate Writing? Try HWT’s Double-Lined Paper

 

This paper has been more useful to older kids (6+) that I see for handwriting help than any other paper on the market, and almost any other tool Problems With Handwriting? You Need The Best Eraser , Great Mechanical Pencils Can Improve Your Child’s Handwriting Skills .  Why?  Regular lined paper, and almost all worksheets, are usually jam-packed with lines.  Red lines, green lines, lines with airplanes and worms.  There are papers designed by occupational therapists that are even more complex than the mass-market choices.

All this is often visual noise to kids with sensory processing issues and ocular or visual-perceptual issues.  These problems are sometimes subtle and appear to be behavioral.  The kids who “hate to write”.  The kids who look away when you are demonstrating how to write a letter or spell a word.  The kids who cannot seem to remember where to start a letter, even after repeated practice.  These children often do much better with HWT’s double-lined paper.

Let’s drill down into the design of this unique paper:

  • Double-lined paper provides just two lines; the baseline and the midline.  Knowing where to start uppercase letters and tall lowercase letters is important, and this paper encourages practice and awareness while still giving some structure to writing.
  • There is a wide empty space between sets of lines.  This is intentional; children have room to place the tails of lowercase “y” and “j”, for example, without blocking the uppercase or tall lowercase letters of the next line of writing.  For many kids, not knowing what to do about crowding and spacing is a good reason to stop trying to write well, or sometimes even write at all.
  • This sturdy paper is pre-punched to be used in a 3-ring binder.  The quality of the paper is very high, which means that it doesn’t tear easily when a child erases a mistake.  Most schools provide the thinnest paper for teachers to use as handouts, creating the potential for a disaster when given to a child that struggles with grading their force on an eraser, or makes multiple errors in a word.
  • Brains get practice in sizing and proportion.  Once kids have a pattern of letter formation, it is easier to accomplish without the extra midline.  But so many kids need that “training wheel” effect much longer than scrolls recognize.  Many kids need a day or two of double-lined paper use to start understanding the way a letter “h” is twice as tall as a letter “a” and the same size but aligned differently than the letter “y”.  Of course, pointing it out is important, and so is working on other writing qualities such as letter and word spacing.
  • Kids write faster.  Because they are guided to proportion and start letters correctly, they don’t waste time thinking about it or erasing incorrect letters.  Again, this doesn’t mean their brain isn’t taking it all in.  If that were true, we would start every kid on single-lined paper in preschool.
  • There are three line sizes, so you don’t have to abandon the double-lines when your kid enter middle school.  I will admit that I wish the pre-k/K paper were thicker.  But it is still fairly sturdy.
  • You can alternate using this paper with single-lined paper to see when to “take the training wheels off” and stop using double-lined paper.  Kids should always have a chance to practice with standard paper, but when the choice is between fighting and crying, and quickly executing a homework assignment, it is no contest.

 

The best paper wins.

joao-rafael-662575-unsplash

Why Parents Used The Fisher-Price Rock and Play Sleeper: Desperation and Confusion

ID-100108085

As a Happiest Baby on the Block (HBOTB) educator, I was thrilled to hear about the product’s recall, and horrified at the number of deaths attributed to this device.  The media spent a lot of time pointing out that the company’s marketing included clear messaging that suggested that children could sleep in it, in defiance of the national pediatrician’s association’s recommendations that children sleep on a flat surface without padding or bedding until they are old enough to move to prevent suffocation.

Many of the stories online made it sound like the company must be out of their mind, or the parents must be idiots.  I don’t think that either thing is true.   I think I know why well-meaning parents listened to the printing on the box and not the hurried message/tri-fold handout from their child’s doctor:  they simply want some sleep.  They see how calm their child is in this device, and don’t know what else to do to get some peace and quiet.  Fisher-Price knew what I know; parents can be desperate and want a convenient solution to their struggles.  Their packaging mentioned both the warning and showed sleeping children in the device.

Babies are amazing, but babies don’t sleep through the night right away.  They often don'[t sleep through the night in the first 6 months.  That is a long time for parents to deal with their own chronic sleeplessness.  Many families are dual-earners, and many parents today are over 30.  Losing a night’s sleep at 23 and losing a night’s sleep at 39 are completely different.  One makes you sluggish.  The other makes you feel like you were hit by a truck.  Have that happen to you for a week, and you cannot handle screaming or exhaustion very well.  Really.  Do that for 6 months, and you might agree to almost anything anyone suggests to get a little more sleep.  When your child is so peaceful in that carrier or infant positioner, you may not want to risk waking them.  Do it anyway.  And learn how to get them back to sleep more easily.

One reason why I became a HBOTB educator was my sympathy for the parents I worked with as an occupational therapist.  These are kind people, intelligent people, but people who were not given great strategies by their pediatricians.  They were told what to do, but not HOW to do it.  Pediatricians aren’t given the time to walk parents through good techniques, even if they know them.  And a lot don’t know how to calm babies.  They know how to cure babies.  Dr. Karp’s techniques tell parents  how.

Since the arrival of the SNOO, things have become a bit simpler.  The need for education hasn’t ended, because unless you intend to spend the first 12 weeks at home each and every day, parents need to know how to calm their babies without a device.  Read Why You Still Need the 5S’s, Even If You Bought a SNOO   if you would like to know more about how HBOTB will save your sanity during the day.

cropped-dscf18881.jpg

The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem

31XYtX2BTeL

Many different ways to use Dycem!

In adult rehab, occupational therapists are regularly providing patients who have incoordination, muscle weakness or joint instability with both skill-building activities and adaptive equipment such as Dycem.  In pediatrics, you see a predominance of skills training.  Adaptive equipment shows up primarily for the most globally and pervasively disabled children.  I think that should change. Why?  Because frustration is an impediment to learning, and adaptive equipment can be like training wheels; you can take them off as skills develop.  When kids aren’t constantly frustrated, they are excited to try harder and feel supported by adults, not aggravated.

 

What Dycem Can Do For Your Child

Dycem isn’t a new product, but you hardly ever see it suggested to kids with mild to moderate motor incoordination, low tone, sensory processing disorders, hypermobility, and dyspraxia.  We let these kids struggle as their cereal bowl spills and their crayons roll away from them.  Dycem matting is a great tool for these kids.  It is grippy on both sides, but it is easy to clean.  Place a terrific bowl or plate on it OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues, and it won’t tip over with gentle pressure, and not even if the surface has a slight incline.  It lasts a long time, and can be cut into any shape needed for a booster seat tray or under the base of a toy like a dollhouse or a toy garage.  Placing a piece of Dycem under your child while they are sitting on a tripp trap chair or a cube chair A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato ChairThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat! will help them keep their pelvis stable while they eat and play.  The bright color contrasts with most objects, supporting kids with visual deficits and poor visual perceptual skills.  It catches their eye and their attention.  As you can see, Dycem has a lot to offer children and parents.

How To Use Dycem To Build Motor Skills

Will it prevent all spills or falls?  No.  But it will decrease the constant failures that cause children to give up and request your help, or cause them to refuse to continue trying.  Children are creating their self-image earlier than you realize, so helping them see themselves as competent is essential.  Will it teach kids not to use their non-dominant hand to stabilize objects?  Not if an adult uses it correctly.  Introducing Dycem at the appropriate stage in motor development and varying when and where it is used is the key.  Children need lots of different types of situations in order to develop bilateral control, and as long as they are given a wide variety of opportunities, offering them adaptive equipment during key activities isn’t going to slow them down.  It will show them that we are supporting them on their journey.  When kids are new to an activity or a skill and need repeated successes to keep trying, Dycem can help them persevere.  When children are moving to the next level of skill and see that they are struggling more, Dycem can support them until they master this new level.

Should you buy the pre-cut mats or the roll of Dycem?  It depends on your needs.  Be aware that Dycem doesn’t stay tacky forever, so the cheaper strategy is the roll.

The Cheap Hack:  Silicone Mats

I will often recommend the use of silicone baking mats instead of dycem.  These inexpensive mats often do the job at a lower cost, and can be easily replaced if lost at daycare or school.  Dycem is a specialty item that can be purchased online but not in most stores.  Silicone mats aren’t as grippy, but they are easily washed and dried.  Some families are averse to anything that looks like adaptive equipment, so I may introduce these mats first to build a parent’s confidence in my recommendations.

dama-delta-699104-unsplash

The Best Ride-On Toy For Younger (or Petite) Toddlers

 

61-g+QMVAYL._SL1000_.jpgAs an occupational therapist, I have always found it difficult to recommend a toddler ride-on toy for younger or smaller kids with low muscle tone and hypermobility.  Most of these toys have such a wide seat that children must propel themselves with their knees rotated out and pushing forward on their toes.  Exactly the pattern of movement we DON’T want to see.

And then I saw the Fly Bike.  This little fold-up bike has a seat that is about 9.5 inches high and has a very narrow seat.  This allows a child’s feet to be aligned with their hips, facilitating the development of hip and trunk control, not substituting bending forward and back to propel the toy.

The textured seat helps grip a child’s clothing for a little extra stability, and the small handlebars mean children aren’t draping their chest over the front of the toy; they are holding onto the handlebars with their hands.  Brilliant.  The rubber wheels are kind to indoor floors, but can handle pavement easily.

Are there children that don’t fit this toy?  Absolutely.  If your child is too tall for this toy, they shouldn’t use it.  If your child cannot maintain adequate sitting balance independently on this toy, they may need more support from another style of ride-on toy, perhaps with a larger seat and a backplate.

I finally have a great ride-on toy that I can recommend for smaller kids.  An early Xmas present to me and my little clients!

wout-vanacker-497472

Deluxe Water Wow Pads Offer More Challenge And More Fun To Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

 

91Wl4b-x3nL._SX425_.jpgMy clients and colleagues know how much I love the original Water Wow books.  They are reusable and mess-free fun for kids at home, at the doctor’s office, the restaurant and the plane ride.  These bigger books are going to be even more fun for preschool kids and kindergarteners!

Here are some great reasons why I love these books:

  • They have more pages, and more pages means they keep kids busy (and happy) longer.
  • They offer more detail and more challenge.  The graphics inspire critical thought (Is this a silly thing to find in the supermarket or not?) and the red lens that looks like a magnifying glass makes kids feel like Sherlock Holmes as they search for secret items.
  • There are mazes, hidden items and pages where kids can compare two almost-identical pictures and find the anomalies.  It is more than just wiping water on a picture.
  • Like the originals, the pages dry quickly and can be used over and over.  It seems like kids would get bored after the first run-through, but children can enjoy the “reveal” and the sensory play of water on a page for a long time after they have solved all the puzzles.  If you are at 30K feet and your kid is getting restless, this could buy you a bit of time without having to resort to screens that they will insist on for the rest of the (expensive) trip.  Genius.
  • Oh, and the pen is easy to grasp, and it develops a mature pencil grasp with repeated use.  Yeah!

I think these would be terrific holiday gifts.  If you are looking for more gift ideas, read Automoblox: For the Discriminating Preschool Gearhead and Melissa And Doug Tape Activity Book Is Reusable Fun for some other good toys that build skills while having fun!