Category Archives: self-care skills

Teach Utensil Grasp and Control…Without the Food!

Therapro has just published my latest guest post! There are some situations that almost require occupational therapists to separate mealtime from utensil manipulation, at least at the earliest stages.  Check out my post Teaching Utensil Use Outside of the Mealtime Experience to find out if your child or client would benefit from this approach!

If you haven’t already read this very popular post I wrote earlier, make learning to use utensils an opportunity to bond emotionally,  take the pressure of self-feeding off the table and help an avoidant child engage in food play with Teach Spoon Grip By Making It Fun And Sharing a Laugh With Your Child.

Therapro has been one of my go-to sources for quality therapy equipment for years.  Take the time to review their catalog online and explore their unique bowls, plates and utensils that can help children with developmental delays achieve independence in self-feeding.

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Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problem With Blankets

 

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Everyone knows that sleep is important.  Research in sleep science (yes, that is a thing) tells us that our brains are working to digest the day’s learning, the immune system is active during sleep, and our bodies are repairing and renewing tissues and organs while we slumber.  As much as we need sleep, kids need it more.  They are building the brains and bodies they will carry into their future.  Children need good quality sleep as much as they need healthy food.

Helping children to sleep well is usually a combination of creating good and consistent bedtime routines, giving them a full day of physical action and warm social interaction, and developing a healthy sleep environment.  This means providing a sleep-positive environment and removing any barriers to sleeping well.  But giving kids the chance to get a good night’s sleep can be harder when a child has hypermobility.

Some of the challenges to sleep are sensory-based, and some are orthopedic.  Here are a few things that make sleep more challenging for these kids:

  • Children with limited proprioception and kinesthesia due to low tone or excessive joint mobility can have difficulty shifting down into a quiet state for sleep.  They spend their day seeking sensory input;  not moving reduces the sensory information that makes them feel calm and organized.  To understand more about the sensory concerns of hypermobility, take a look at Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children.
  • Some hypermobile kids have joint or muscle pain that keeps them up or wakes them up.
  • Hypermobile kids can get arms and legs caught in their bedclothes or between crib slats and mattresses.  Any layer can be a potential problem, from the top sheet to the decorative afghan that Granny sent for his birthday.
  • Limbs can slide off the mattress during deep sleep and create strain on ligaments and tendons.   You and I depend on our brain to perceive an awkward position and take corrective action.  The same child who “w” sits and slides off a chair without noticing is not going to wake up when her arm is hanging off the bed during sleep, even though the tissues are stretching beyond their typical range of motion.

Here are some simple strategies that may improve your child’s sleep:

  • Try a duvet or a flannel sheet set to minimize the number of layers of bedclothes.
  • Use a rashguard suit instead of pajamas.  I am particularly fond of the zip-front style so that less force is needed to get arms in and out while dressing.  You can peel it off more easily.  The lycra creates sensory feedback that can support body awareness while keeping them cozy.  An all-in-one suit also gives a bit of support so that limbs don’t easily overstretch.  A little bit of proprioceptive input in a breathable fabric that can also generate a bit of neutral warmth (from body heat) to keep tissues from getting too stiff.
  • Avoid footie sleepers that are too short.  Too-small footie sleepers create compressive forces on joints and could even encourage spinal torque.  Hypermobile kids will be the last ones to complain since they often don’t feel discomfort right away.  My preference is not to use these sleepers at all with hypermobile kids or kids with low tone.  See the next suggestion for another reason why I feel this way.
  • Make them take off those footie sleepers when they wake up and walk around.  As fabric twists and children stand/walk on the fabric, not the soles, it creates a safety risk underfoot.  Less sensory feedback and slippery soles!!  Get them dressed once they wake up.
  • Carefully consider weighted blankets.  Originally sold for kids on the autistic spectrum and for kids with sensory processing disorders without muscle or orthopedic issues, these blankets have become popular with other groups.  The biggest concern is that placing weight (meaning force) on an unstable joint over time without conscious awareness or adult control is a safety issue.  It is possible to create ligament injury or even subluxation of a joint, depending on limb position and the amount of force placed on a joint.  Talk this one over with your OTR or PT before you order one of these blankets.
  • Consider aromatherapy, gentle massage, white noise machines, and other gentler sleep strategies to help your child sleep well.  For kids who sleep well but wake up stiff, learn how to use gentle massage and possibly heat to help them get going.
  • Try K-Taping or Hip Helpers for stability.  Kineseotape stays on for days and gives joint support and sensory input while your child sleeps.  Hip Helpers are snug lycra bike shorts that limit extreme hip abduction for the littlest kids  (legs rotate out to the sides excessively).  They gently help your child align hip joints correctly.  As with weighted blankets, I strongly recommend consulting with your therapists to learn about how to use both of these strategies.  When used incorrectly, both can create more problems for your child.

 

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Potty Training Boys: Do You Teach Standing Up Or Sitting Down?

 

darran-shen-477150.jpgTraining children for bladder control before bowel control is often easier for quite a few reasons:  More frequent bathroom trips = more opportunities for success, digestion and diet issues don’t stall success,  and urination is usually a painless, phobia-free, and quick experience.  In general, families that hire me as a consultant are encouraged to consider bladder training to be the first mountain to conquer.

But should little boys sit or stand to do the deal?  After a child has been sitting on the potty, understands it’s use, and has consistent success, I will encourage parents to have their sons stand to urinate.  But it isn’t as simple as that.  There are pros and cons.

First, the pros of standing to urinate:

  • little boys have probably seen their brothers, cousins and dad use the toilet, and most children want to copy their same-gender parent.  This is often more motivation to become independent in the bathroom.
  • young children may be a little more mindful of why they are standing in front of the toilet.  Children that are sitting have a harder time seeing what is happening and can get distracted. I know, I know, even the “big boys” can have terrible aim.  But children need all the help they can get to stay focused.
  • improving aim is motivation to use the toilet.  I wrote a blog post on using targets to teach boys to improve their accuracy and build interest in toileting.Piddlers Make Potty Training Fun!  These really work!

And now the cons:

  • See the item about distractibility under “pros”.  Some boys are so distracted that sitting on an toilet seat insert with a splash guard is the only way to prevent spraying the bathroom and any supervising adult.
  • Some children will start out urinating and begin to have a bowel movement concurrently.  Oops!  These children often have issues with low tone or digestive problems, and cannot “hold it” long enough to finish urinating and then sit on the toilet to have a bowel movement.  If they have an accident, it could be very upsetting to them and make them less eager to be fully trained.
  • Children with low muscle tone or postural stability issues may need to sit to achieve a safe and stable position.  No one can eliminate when they are unsteady or fearful.

Some children are vocal and clearly tell you what they want to do and why.  Some cannot or will not communicate, but you can figure out what they are thinking.  Some need to be encouraged to give standing a try.  If your son was initially interested and now has lost some of his enthusiasm and is still sitting to urinate, try telling him that it is time to stand like the big guys and see if you can regain some of your momentum in toilet training!

For more information on toilet training children with low muscle tone, check out my other posts such as   Low Tone and Toilet Training: The 4 Types of Training Readiness   as well as my useful e-book.  Here is a post that explains why this unique book will help you move forward with training right away! The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Make Wiping Your Child’s Nose Easier With Boogie Wipes

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It is cold and flu season here in the states, and I have already seen my share of snot-caked little faces.  Little children get more colds than older kids and adults, and they can turn into an agitated mess when you say “Honey, I need to wipe your nose”.  These wipes are going to make your job as chief booger-wiper a lot easier!

When I first saw Boogie Wipes, I will confess that I thought it was another expensive product to separate first-world parents from their money.  After all, I grew up on dry tissues and I survived.

I was wrong.  These really work.

At first, I thought that the use of moisture was the key to their success.  Not so.  Parents told me that using a regular baby wipe didn’t “do the deal” the way a Boogie Wipe took care of the snot problem and made kids calm down about nose-wiping.  I had to find out what really made this product better.

  1. Boogie Wipes have a few important ingredients that separate them from the standard baby wipes.  The first ingredient is water.  The second ingredient is sodium chloride; good old salt.  Saline is a combo of these two ingredients, and saline softens the gluey crud that is dried-on snot.  It also thins the still-wet snot so you can wipe it away without pressing so hard on tender skin.  Yeah!
  2. The next four ingredients are aloe leaf juice, chamomile flower extract, vitamin E and glycerin.  All gentle and (to most children) non-irritating skin conditioners.  I am a huge fan of Puffs Plus tissues, but these wipes are gentler than my fave tissues.  Children’s skin is so much more delicate than ours, and the ingredients in snot are so irritating.  That is even before it becomes a dried-on coating.  Boogie Wipes leave a thin coating of skin conditioners after you wipe your child’s face.  This coating acts as a slight skin barrier for the next drip of snot.  Brilliant!

The remaining ingredients are preservatives that prevent your open container of Boogie Wipes from becoming a source of germs instead of a source of relief.  I am sure that there are children who react to these preservatives, but I haven’t yet met any families that report problems over the years that this product has been available in NY.

Unless you know your child will react to these specific preservatives, I recommend trying the unscented version first (they come in fresh and lavender scents too) and using them before your child gets a cold.  It is kinder to find out that they are sensitive to any ingredients before their skin is already irritated by all that snot from an illness.  Kids whose skin is going to react will likely do so when well, but their skin can recover from any irritation more quickly when their immune system is not also fighting a bad cold.

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The Boogie folks do sell a saline spray as well as wipes, and I am all for using saline spray to loosen up internal nose crud.  The problem with sprays isn’t that they don’t work.  They do, and they work well.

The problem is that children are naturally avoidant of us sticking things up their noses, and they are really bad at controlling the “sniff” in order to efficiently suck the spray up into their sinuses.  I teach children how to blow their noses and how to handle sprays.  It is part of my job as an OTR.  Not the best part, but nevertheless, a part of teaching ADLs.  I haven’t had much success teaching children under 3 to use nose sprays.  They just get more frightened and upset.  If you have an older child or a child that seems less afraid of nose examinations at the pediatrician, then go ahead and give sprays a try.  It can really loosen up a clogged nose.

Good luck trying Boogie Wipes, or try the generic versions that I am starting to see on store shelves.  Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so manufacturers are telling us that they also know that these products really work!

A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair

 

Therapists often recommend these well-designed seats for kids that need solid foot support, but even the best hip and chest strapping doesn’t always mean that a child is actively using their feet for postural control.

As a young therapist, I used tape, foam, and towel rolls everywhere, as if I was creating a modern sculpture.  For the most part, all I got for my effort was frustration.  Food and force tend to make short work of the most ingenious wedges and supports on a chair used for feeding.  Then I got smarter and decided to make this a lot easier on everyone.

I wanted to share my easiest strategy for helping children place their feet on a foot plate and keep them there:  shoes!

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The little guy in the “before” photo has generalized low tone and hypermobility.  His pelvis is reasonably stable using the existing straps on the chair, and he is able to reach forward to finger-feed, partially activating his trunk and hip musculature.  But those feet just tapped away on the footplate, and his legs remained extended at the knee through most of the meal.  He is too little to respond to any verbal prompts for posture, but not completely addicted to gaining sensory input though his feet.  He is there for the food, and the foot movements were his way of gaining sensory input and entertaining himself!

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Non-skid soles, and totally stylish, too!

Just putting on his tiny boat shoes gives him some “grip” on the foot plate, and he stayed in this position for the rest of the meal with our repositioning his body at all!  He still has to develop some hip control so his knees don’t move laterally as he reaches forward.  Using shoes with non-skid soles is an easy hack to help him get some distal stability without constantly touching and repositioning him.  Kids that get a lot of therapy and need almost total help for toileting and dressing really start to hate all our manhandling after a while.

Hope this gives parents and therapists an idea that requires very little effort and can  deliver immediate results!

Wondering how you are going to deal with potty training?  Check out my new e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  There is so little useful advice out there for parents of children with hypotonia!  My book as checklists and specific strategies for pre-training, choosing equipment such as seat inserts, and covers the sensory and social/emotional consequences of low tone as it relates to learning this important life skill.

My book is available on my website tranquil babies, at  Amazon and on Your Therapy Source, a great resource for pediatric therapy materials.  Coming soon:  my next book on raising a child with hypermobility.  It will include strategies for positioning, play, ADLs, and school activities.  My web designer suggested that I should add short videos so that you can see demonstrations and equipment/toys that make life easier for everyone!  Please submit comments if you have your own suggestions to make this book a great resource for parents and therapists!

An Affordable Sensory-Friendly Clothing Line Has Arrived!

 

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A boy’s tee from the Cat and Jack collection at Target

Here in the US, kids are getting ready to start the school year.  A mom mentioned to me that Target is now carrying sensory-friendly clothing by Cat and Jack; attractive and functional clothes for kids who find tags, seams and textured clothing uncomfortable.  I went to check them out online.  Here is what I learned:

The selection is limited but sufficient for kids who don’t have to wear a uniform for school.  It includes clothes for toddlers up through grade school.  I saw leggings and tees, both long and short-sleeved.  There aren’t any tags and the seams are sewn flat.  The garments have been pre-washed for softness, which saves parents some work.  I know that there are kids who insist their new clothing be repeatedly laundered to get out the stiffening agents that have been applied to fabrics.

I know that this limited line doesn’t solve the problem of getting your child into formal clothing for a big wedding, and it may not have every color under the sun, but it is nice to see affordable clothing options for kids who struggle with this issue.

In my experience as a pediatric OT, children could still have issues with tolerating sleeves and pant legs.  Some kids find the movement of fabric on skin irritating, regardless of the level of softness.  I suggest that you ask your OT about desensitization techniques that can help you and your child have better experiences when dressing, regardless of the type of garment.

Happy Back-To-School shopping!

 

 

How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There”

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Potty training is a process.  For most kids, the final frontier is managing bowel movements.  Compared to learning to pee into the toilet, little kids are often more stressed by bowel movements and have less opportunities to practice.  Constipation or just the discomfort of normal elimination can make them wary, sometimes enough to convince some children that this is a process better done in a diaper.  In comparison, urination isn’t an uncomfortable experience for healthy children.  Bowel movements sometimes happen only a few times a week, instead of the multiple times a child needs to urinate per day.  Less practice and fewer opportunities for rewards (even if your reward is warm praise) make bowel training harder.

So when they finally make the leap and manage to do #2 in the toilet, a lot of parents decide to delay teaching their child how to wipe themselves.  After all, wiping can be messy and it has to be done well enough for good hygiene.  Here are my top suggestions to make “making” a complete success:

  1. Teaching should still be part of your narrative while you are the one doing the wiping.  In my book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Tone, I teach parents how to transform daily diapering into pre-teaching.  While you are wiping, and even while you are waiting for them to finish on the toilet, your positive narrative about learning this skill doesn’t end.  You are telling your child how it’s done, in detail, as you are doing it. You convey with your words, your tone and your body language that this is a learn-able skill.
  2. Don’t forget the power of the “dry run”.  Practice with your child when he is in the bathroom, whether it is before bath time, before dressing, or during a special trip to the bathroom to practice.  Dry runs take away the mess but teach your child’s brain the motor planning needed to lean back, reach back and move that hand in the correct pattern.  The people that invented the Kandoo line of wipes have an amusing way to practice posted on their site:  spread peanut or sunflower butter on a smooth plate, and give your child some wipes or TP.  Tell him to clean the plate completely.  This is a visual and motor experience that teaches how much work it is to clean his tush well.  After this practice, your child will make a real effort, not just wave the paper around.  Brilliant!
  3. Will you have to reward him for this practice? Possibly.  It doesn’t have to be food or toys.  It could be the ability to choose tonight’s dessert for the family, or reading an extra two books at bedtime.  You decide on the reward based on your values and your child’s desires.
  4. Use good tools.  The adult-sized wet wipe is your friend.  The extra sensory information of a wet wipe versus a wad of dry paper is helpful when vision isn’t an option.  They are less likely to be dropped accidentally when clean, but having a good hold is especially important after it has been used. “Yucky”stuff  makes kids not want to hold on!  Wet wipes are more likely to wipe that little tush cleanly.  Don’t cut corners.  Allow your child to use more than one.
  5. Take turns.  Who wipes first and who bats “clean-up” (couldn’t resist that one!) is your decision.  Some children want you to make sure they are clean before they try, and some are insistent that they go first with anything.  This can change depending on mood and even time of day.  Be flexible, but don’t stand there like a foreman, ordering work but not willing to help out.  One of my favorite strategies is to always offer help, but be rather slow and inefficient.  This gives children the chance to rise to the occasion but still feel like you are always willing to support them.

 

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Take a look at my e-book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your child With Low Muscle Tone to get a clear understanding of how to prepare for and execute your plan without tears on both sides.  Will it help you even if your child doesn’t have low muscle tone?  Of course!  Most of my techniques simply speed up the learning process for typically-developing children.  And who doesn’t want to make potty independence happen faster?

This e-book is available on my website tranquil babies, at Your Therapy Source (a great site for parents and therapists), and on Amazon.  Read more about my book with Amazon’s “look inside” section, or by reading The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!