Category Archives: preschoolers

Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing

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Therapists always try hard to be optimistic when discussing their pediatric client’s future.  Why not?  Kids have amazing potential, and we aren’t fortune tellers; there are so many things that can go right.

As therapists, we also should share the reality of how bad choices create unfortunate consequences.  Among them are the long-term results of falls, especially head injuries.  Kids fall, kids trip, kids walk into things.  All kids, and for much of early childhood.  The hypermobile child will have more episodes of injury, often has greater injury occurring in each episode, and frequently experiences a slower or less complete recovery from injury.  This isn’t a criticism of parents, kids, or even acute medical care.  It is the reality of living with a condition, often a syndrome, that has effects beyond just loose joints.

This can include connective tissue disorders that create weak skin, ligaments, and tendons, decreased pain registration, delayed protective reactions when falling, and cognitive or behavioral complications that make learning and controlling actions more difficult.  Hypermobile kids often spend more years in an unstable state in which they need assistance and supervision.  And more years when they are vulnerable to serious injury.  A head injury or a spine injury isn’t an “unfortunate” event.  It is frequently a life-changing event.  The course of education and employment can be forever altered.  For the worse.

In a clinic or school setting, your therapist is bound to guidelines that indemnify them and the facility. While they cannot control what happens at home, you should know what to do to make your home safer for a child with hypermobility.  It begins with your environment, then you change your responses, then your build  your child’s ability to incorporate safety awareness into their day.

  • Create a safe but accessible home.  This expands on “baby proofing” to include railings set at a height that allow your child to push up rather than hang on them.  Removal of loose rugs and adding padded floor surfaces in common areas, especially areas where they are climbing or running.  Bathrooms are the location for many injuries once children become independent in toileting or bathing.  Instead of supervising them forever, create a safe place with hidden grab bars (there are toilet paper holders and towel racks that are actually grab bars) and non-slip flooring.  Place needed items within easy reach without climbing.
  • Teach safe movement from the start.  Children that learn how to move versus children that are passively moved will have more safety awareness.  For children that still need a lot of help, narrate your moves and weave in safety messages.  It will sink in.  Finally, don’t allow unsafe moves, even if they didn’t hurt themselves.  Tell them to try it again the safe way.  Children are unable to anticipate the results of their actions.  This is why we don’t let 12 year-olds drive or let 5 year-olds cross the street alone.  Sometimes the reason they do things our way is because we said so.  Until they are old enough to understand the “why”.
  • Share your thought processes with children as soon as they can wrap their heads around things.  Even kids in preschool can follow along with the idea that too many “boo-boos” will stop them from being able to play.  Older kids can learn that the right chair helps them stave off fatigue until they finish a game.
  • Ask your therapists for specific safety advice, and then carefully think through their answers.  The truth is that some therapists are more safety-aware than others.  I have been told that I am one of the most vocal therapists on a team when regarding safety issues.  Perhaps it is because I spent 10 years working in adult rehab, treating patients for problems that started decades before I met them.  I have seen what overuse and poor design has cost people.  By then it is often too late to do much more than compensation and adaptation.  I am committed to prevention with my pediatric clients.  The cost is too high not to say something and say it loud.

For more information and ideas about helping your child with hypermobility, read Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?

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Afraid to Toilet Train? Prepare Your Child… and Prepare Yourself

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I spend an extra 30 minutes at the end of a session this week helping a mom build her courage and confidence so that she felt ready to start toilet training soon.  Her child is over 3, has sensory and motor issues, but shows tons of signs for readiness:  dry diapers for increasingly long periods, tells adults when he needs to “go”, able to manage clothing, etc.  He also has no confidence in his abilities, rarely likes change or challenge, and is super-sensitive to altering routines and using new environments.  This isn’t going to be seamless.

It isn’t clear who is the more prepared individual, but I think it could be the child.

This mom read my favorite marketplace book on training “Oh Crap”, and she needs to re-read it with an eye to the many ways in which her child fits the picture of a child that could NEVER be fully ready to train.  This species is so averse to novelty and challenge that no treat or toy is a great enough reward.  Nothing is more frightening to them than failure, and you simply cannot miss the diaper.  It is familiar, fail-proof, and allows children to never have to monitor their body signals or stop watching Paw Patrol to go to the potty.  Ever.

This child is likely to be experiencing the normal sensations of fullness and pressure (as the bladder and rectum fill) as uncomfortable and a little scary.  This interoceptive input can be one that children are sensitive to in the same way that the find seams on clothes or lying down for a diaper change unpleasant.  He requires a lot of support to tolerate and process tactile input and vestibular input, so it isn’t exactly surprising that he would find interoceptive sensation difficult to handle.  Adding a new routine for dealing with elimination, placing it in a room he rarely uses (the bathroom) and being old enough to know that he could “fail” and old enough to absorb outside comments about being “dirty” is more than enough to make this harder than it should be.

My suggestions to this mom included:

  • Adding more vocabulary to her discussions about toilet training.  Speaking about the feelings of pressure and fullness, the actions of pushing the poop out gently, and cleaning/wiping with clear messaging that this is a learning experience that nobody does perfectly.  Hearing that his parents had “accidents” when they were little, and that every child will have accidents, well, this could really help both of them.
  • Dressing him lightly, or choosing to go naked or just underpants (I like two layers of training pants if they still fit his tiny heine!) so that there are fewer barriers to making it to the potty means she may need to shop for training garments.
  • Planning the environment if she is going to let him go naked.  All living events except sleeping need to happen in places where accidents can be cleaned up easily.  She isn’t averse to staining the carpet, but I assured her that her child knows not to spill things on that carpet.  He is too old not to interpret soiling it as a failure.  When she runs to clean it up, he will feel badly.  If she doesn’t have to rush and shows no stress, he will relax about the almost inevitable accident.  He NEEDS  the confidence to move forward.
  • Consider more media about toileting and the arc of learning.  Most children don’t like to talk about things that distress them.  But they LOVE to read about others who are going through the same things.  I suggested that she weave in some new books about characters who are learning to use the toilet, and add comments about their feelings as they learn.  This would include how excited and proud the character is.  Proud can be a new word in his vocabulary!

 

Training a child that has low tone?  I wrote an e-book for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is filled with preparation ideas, strategies to address the common issues of sensory processing limitations and the behavioral effects of low tone, and even includes a guide to building readiness instead of waiting for it to arrive!  You can find it on my website Tranquil Babies,  on Amazon  , and on a terrific site for occupational therapy materials, Your Therapy Source

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Does Your Child Still Chew on Clothes or Toys?

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Babies love to munch on their toys.  They nibble at book bindings, chew the heck out of their loveys, and some little ones really love to chew their pacifiers.  As they grow, most children let go of this behavior.  Chewing and biting for sensory exploration and state modulation diminishes and a child’s behavior evolves into thinking, communicating, and smooth internal state regulation.

But some older kids slip their sleeve or shirt collar into their mouth whenever they can, and are left with a soggy mess by the end of the day.  They suck on their markers or the grocery store cart.  Their toys and pencils are ragged witnesses to the continuing use of oral stimulation, long past the first year or two of life.

Why do they do this?

Some kids are seeking to fill an oral cavity that is less stimulated due to low muscle tone, hypermobility and/or limited sensory discrimination.  Shoving a sleeve in there provides that sensory boost as muscles, skin and ligaments stretch.  Children that need more sensory input due to inactivity, boredom, physical limitations and illness use oral input as an always-available and independent option.  Other kids use biting and chewing to modulate their level of arousal (and open their eustachian tubes, BTW!).  While most OTs know about the modulation piece, the way biting and chewing impact hearing and even vestibular health isn’t so commonly considered.  Biting can stem nystagmus for some kids, and it can lessen dizziness or help a child move their eyes apart as they watch objects in the distance (divergence) for reading the board and for sports.  For kids that use biting well after the toddler biting phase should be over, evaluating any ocular (eye) or ENT issues can be helpful.

Exploring the level of stress in a child’s life outside the classroom or therapy clinic is another consideration.  Biting and chewing are calming proprioceptive inputs that a child can use when they are anxious or fearful, or just uncertain.  It may not be possible to impact the stress of divorce, moving to a new home, or adding a newborn to the family, but appreciating these situations as factors in behavior can improve how families, teachers and therapists respond.  Older children could be trying to modulate their level of arousal without causing trouble by running, jumping or yelling.  Chewing is less likely to be disruptive in a classroom setting.

What Can You Do Once a Chewing Habit is Established?

Once oral sensory seeking behavior takes hold, it isn’t easy to stop.  It can be very satisfying and accessible, particularly for young children.  Addressing the core cause or causes means taking things one step at a time.  Many children do well with a multi-sensory diet added to their daily activities.  More physical activity or more frequent activity breaks can help.  I find that more vestibular input in particular can be powerful.  Using whistles can be helpful when chosen well and supervised for safety and overall modulation.   Some children need to become more aware of their behaviors; older kids can use some of the “How Does Your Engine Run?” concepts to take responsibility for their behaviors and independently seek alternative sensory input.  Kids that learn mindfulness techniques can incorporate those into their program as well.

The use of chewing objects can help, but there are three concerns that have to be addressed:  hygiene, safety, and speech.  A child that sucks or chews on any object isn’t going to monitor its cleanliness, so make sure you use non-toxic soap that is carefully rinsed off.  A chewing necklace should never be worn while sleeping due to safety issues, nor can it be used when it could become snagged on branches or sports equipment.  And finally, having something in the mouth, whether it is a pacifier or a chewing toy, will minimize and alter speech if it isn’t removed for communication.  Never allow a child who is talking or learning to talk to devolve into head nods so they can keep chewing.

Looking for more information on sensory issues?  Read Sensory Sensitivity In Toddlers: Why Responding Differently to “Yucky!” Will Help Your Child and Weaning the Pacifier From An Older Child.

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Are Your Other Children Resentful of Your Special Needs Child?

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This is something that is hardly ever spoken of, but it happens in many, if not most families.  The good news is that it is normal, it doesn’t predict future behavior, and you can address it without sending everyone to a psychiatrist.

The time and energy demands of a special needs child aren’t always in proportion to a child’s delays.  Surgeries or therapy intensives can pull you away for weeks.  The little things, like therapy always being at the same time as someone’s soccer games, are actually harder for siblings over time.  Even sharing lap time can be tough for a toddler who was, until recently, able to climb into your arms anytime.

Remember, toddlers naturally see the world as theirs, and assume that they and their actions are a part of everything that happens to them, good or bad.  They will not be able to fully comprehend why their sibling may take a long time to be able to play with them.  Older children may perceive that it isn’t “nice” to complain about their perceived lack of parental attention, but they feel it.

What can you do?  I believe that quality time is the answer, but only part of the answer.  When you are planning, engaging in, and reminiscing about the quality time that you spent with your child, regardless of whether they are 18 months old or 18 years old, you approach it as if you were in a long-distance love affair.

If you were dating someone across the country, you would talk about the upcoming rendezvous with excitement, you would savor every short minute of it, and you would reconnect afterward, reminding your beloved of the wonderful time you had, and what you hope will happen the next time.

The twist that I learned from Dr. Harvey Karp’s wonderful book The Happiest Toddler on the Block is to put into words exactly how you FEEL about your child and the terrific plans (or event that just passed).  Saying “I am SO, SO, looking forward to reading our special book tonight!” with a smile can mean that a child will put up with your absence at that soccer game.  Reminding a child “Remember when we went out for ice cream alone, nobody else?  That was fun!” helps them handle the fact that they are bathing with the nanny or big sister while you bathe and dress your special needs child.  Even responding with sympathy:”I know…I am sad too that I can’t go with you to your playdate because I have to take Jonah to PT” and using a tone of voice, facial expression and body language that messages real regret; this will help your child handle their feelings without becoming aggressive or shamed for their feelings.

I think this works extremely well with your special needs child’s siblings.  Kids need to hear how happy you are to be with them, that you look forward and backward with pleasure.  They know on some level, even as toddlers, that they don’t get all your attention.  But they really want and need to hear that you love being with them as much as they love being with you.  It could be an ice cream run just with them.  A game of catch just with them.  Reading a new book together.  Almost anything will work, as long as you elaborate on your feelings as well as talking about the event itself.  Mentioning your excitement or good memories during a calm time works better than wedging the comments in between correcting actions and giving consequences.  A casual mention of your future plans can smooth out a lot of feathers!

Looking for more information on parenting when you have a special needs child?  Read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child and Universal Design For Parents of Special Needs Kids: It’s Important for You Too! and also The Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat!

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Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child?

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Affordable accessibility and no institutional appearance!

I know that some of you don’t even realize that such a thing exists:  a toilet sized for preschoolers and kindergarteners!  Well, you won’t find it in Lowe’s or Home Depot on the showroom floor, but you can buy them online, and it is an option to consider.  Here are the reasons you might put one in your child’s main bathroom:

  1. You have the space already.  Some homes are large enough to allow each bedroom to have its own bathroom.   If you have the option, it might be worth it during renovations.  It shouldn’t add considerably to the overall cost, and it should not be that difficult to swap out when your child grows.  If you have a bathroom near the playroom, that might be another good location for this potty.  Most older kids and adults can make it to another half-bath on that floor, but it might be perfect for your younger child and his friends!
  2. Your child is terrified of the standard-height potty.  Some kids are unstable, some are afraid of heights, and some have such poor proprioception and/or visual skills that they really, really need their feet on the ground, not on a footstool.
  3. Your child was a preemie, and their growth pattern indicates that they will fit on this toilet comfortably for a while.  Some preemies catch up, and some stay on the petite size.  Those children will be able to use a preschool-right potty into early elementary school.  Even if your preemie is average in size, they may have issues such as vision or sensory sensitivity that will make this potty a great idea for a shorter time.

I am just beginning to build my materials to do in-home consultations as a CAPS, but I think that an underserved population are parents of special needs kids that would benefit from universal design and adaptive design.  This toilet would come under the category of adaptive design, and it is an easily affordable solution for some children.  Having more comfort on the toilet speeds up training for many kids.  It also decreases the aggravation of training and monitoring safety for parents.  I am very committed to helping the entire family have an easier time of things like toilet training.

Think about what your family’s needs and capabilities are, and if you are planning to remodel or build a new home, consider finding a CAPS professional in your area to help you make your home as welcoming for your special needs child as possible!  For more information, read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child.

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How Being Toilet Trained Changes Your Child’s Life

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Think your child doesn’t care that he is wearing pull-ups in pre-K?  Well, he might not…yet.  After all, he doesn’t know another life.  He has been using a diaper (because we know that pull-ups aren’t anything other than a diaper, right?) for elimination since his first day of life.  Wait until he is trained, and you may see the difference that being trained will make for him.

Children who have accomplished toilet training have made a significant step forward in independence.  They are the masters of their domain, to borrow from Seinfeld.  Not needing help for something so personal, they have a different attitude about body ownership and privacy.  This is important and personally meaningful.  We want children to have pride in their bodies and a sense that they own them.  Even though you would never harm your child, when you are involved in their “business”, you are taking some of that pure ownership away.  The sooner they have a sense that they can manage alone, or with only a bit of help for the hard bits, they build their sense of self.

When kids master a major life skill, they often are more willing to take on other skills such as writing and dressing.  They are interested in holding their spoon and fork the “grown-up” way.  They have entered the world of the older child, in their minds.  And adults aren’t immune.  We see potty trained kids differently too.  When they are able to take care of themselves in the bathroom, we start raising our expectations for them as well, and treat them as older children, not babies.  And they react to our change in perception as well.  Toilet training can lift everyone up!

The practical realities of life mean that being trained allows them to go to activities and even schools that they wouldn’t be able to attend.  Pools and camps have rules, and being fully engaged with their community means being out there and participating as much as possible.

A mom told me yesterday that her 5 year-old told her “I am so happy that I can use the potty!”  It took him a long time to get all the skills together to be fully trained, and he is off on a family cruise next week.  This will be the first time he can attend cruise camp with his older brother.  He has arrived!

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How To Stop Your Toddler From Hitting You

 

patrick-fore-557736When your sweet little baby turns into a toddler that smacks you, you may be so shocked that you don’t know how to react.  The second time you get hit, or pinched, or even bitten in anger, you might feel a level of rage come up that is both surprising and horrifying.  Well, I am not going to shame you for any of that.  I want to help you get this under control and help your child handle what is (probably) a normal level of aggression.

Yes, this is likely a normal response for toddlers.  They have really limited language, hardly any understanding of their own feelings, and they live in the moment.  You probably have one of the 85% of kids who are not placidly calm most of the time.  If you have a very young child with a strongly spirited temperament (15-20% of the population) then you probably see this behavior at least a few times a week, if not daily.  It’s still normal. And you have to deal with it or you will have a bigger, stronger, and more aggressive child next year.

Here are my suggestions to deal with aggression:

  1. You are going to have to use Dr. Karp’s Fast Food Rule.  The first simple step is to state what you think your child is thinking, such as ” You say “No go inside”, in as short and simple a phrase as you can, based on age and level of emotion.  The younger and more angry your child is, the simpler the message.  Match your expression and gestures to the emotion you are stating.
  2. Wait for a shift in body language or level of screaming.  Repeat the phrase if needed, may be more than once.  Then state “No (biting, hitting, throwing)” and you say  “I don’t like it” or a “We don’t hit” if your child isn’t totally out of control.  If they are out of control, you have to wait until they can hear you.
  3. You must make it clear that YOU don’t like this behavior, not simply that it isn’t “nice”.  Why?  Because a personal message is more powerful to a toddler than stating that they broke the rules.  I even throw in “That scared me and I don’t like it” to slightly older toddlers, to come down to their level.  They might be a little surprised, but they know all about being scared.  You aren’t admitting weakness, you are telling them how they crossed a line.  As long as you are using body language that tells them you are still the adult in control, this helps them understand the seriousness of what they did.  But the 12-18 month olds don’t get that, so wait until they are older to add that one in.
  4. If you were holding your child when this happened, put him down. Nothing says confuse me like saying these phrases while cuddling.  If you were sitting next to them, move away a bit.  The message is that they have crossed a line, because they have.  They may cry about this, but that is OK.  For now.  Once they shift out of aggression, you can be more welcoming.  Get it?  Good behavior we welcome, aggression we do not.  Simple.
  5. If you see the clouds building and you can anticipate your child will hit, bit, kick or throw, you are allowed to intervene.  Pull your arm away, put them down, reach for the toy you think she will throw, or move away.  You could say “I don’t want you to kick” and then offer a solution.  This solution could be what you think your child needs, like a nap or a snack, or it could be something amusing, like looking in your purse for your keys.  Young toddlers can switch things easily.  Older toddlers sometimes commit to aggression and they won’t take the bait.  But sometimes they will.
  6. Don’t be afraid to issue consequences.  I don’t believe in physical punishment, but I have no problem with removing toys that got thrown or issuing kind time-outs.  Losing the opportunity to go do something fun because you tossed your boots at my head is just fine for me.  I never reward bad behavior.  Ever.  I have too much to lose if a child thinks that aggression will work to avoid something or receive something.  Kids can hurt themselves in the process of being aggressive, and that is always going to be my fault.  Not a chance.
  7. I always give children a chance to come back into the fold.  Maybe not to get the same thing they were being aggressive about, but a new fun thing.  You have to wait until they are calm to do this.  This isn’t coddling.  This is teaching them how I want them to behave, and that there is always a chance to do things better.