Category Archives: parenting

The Best Ride-On Toy For Younger (or Petite) Toddlers

 

61-g+QMVAYL._SL1000_.jpgAs an occupational therapist, I have always found it difficult to recommend a toddler ride-on toy for younger or smaller kids with low muscle tone and hypermobility.  Most of these toys have such a wide seat that children must propel themselves with their knees rotated out and pushing forward on their toes.  Exactly the pattern of movement we DON’T want to see.

And then I saw the Fly Bike.  This little fold-up bike has a seat that is about 9.5 inches high and has a very narrow seat.  This allows a child’s feet to be aligned with their hips, facilitating the development of hip and trunk control, not substituting bending forward and back to propel the toy.

The textured seat helps grip a child’s clothing for a little extra stability, and the small handlebars mean children aren’t draping their chest over the front of the toy; they are holding onto the handlebars with their hands.  Brilliant.  The rubber wheels are kind to indoor floors, but can handle pavement easily.

Are there children that don’t fit this toy?  Absolutely.  If your child is too tall for this toy, they shouldn’t use it.  If your child cannot maintain adequate sitting balance independently on this toy, they may need more support from another style of ride-on toy, perhaps with a larger seat and a backplate.

I finally have a great ride-on toy that I can recommend for smaller kids.  An early Xmas present to me and my little clients!

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Construction Site on Christmas Night: A New Classic Is Born!

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Anyone that knows the board book Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site should run right out and get this one for next week.  OK, maybe you won’t be able to wait that long.   Read it when you get it home!  An absolutely read it before your young child goes to bed on Christmas Eve!  Santa will wait a little longer for his cookies and milk.

The graphics are just detailed enough, but not so complex that most 2 year-olds can’t figure out what is going on.  There is some repetition so they can keep up with the story, but older kids can follow the concepts of kindness and caring in relationships.  The rhyming text is terrific for kids learning phonics.   Rhyming has been working out well for audiences of all ages, even before Shakespeare’s iambic pentameter.  Works for me, too!  This is a fun book for parents to read out loud, which is good because you will be reading it over and over, night after night, long after the decorations are packed away.

The construction vehicles in the story end up building a new fire house for the fire engines, but they get some treats for themselves as well.  It is a happy story with a lot of warmth and a wonderful chance to talk about how good it feels to give.

Enjoy this fun little book during the holiday season!

A Great Toilet Training Book for Neurotypical Kids: Oh Crap Potty Training!

sean-wells-471209My readers know that I wrote an e-book on potty training kids with low tone ( The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! ) but I have to admit, I learn a lot from other authors.  Jamie Glowacki  has written a terrific book that speaks clearly and directly to parents who aren’t sure they are up to the challenge of toilet training.  Oh Crap Potty Training is a funny title, but it is filled with useful ideas that help parents understand their toddler better and understand training needs so they can tackle this major life skill with humor and love.  I have to admit, I am really happy that she suggests parents of kids with developmental issues ask their OT for advice.  So few parents actually do!

Here are a few of her concepts that illustrate why I like her book so much:

  1. She gets the situation toddlers find themselves in:  using the potty is a total change in a comforting daily routine.  Jamie points out that since birth, your child has only known elimination into a diaper.  The older they are when you start training, the longer they have been using diapers.  WE are excited to move them on, but they can be afraid to sit, afraid to fail, and afraid of the certainty of the diaper always being there.  You can’t NOT get it in the diaper!  She also gets the power struggle that can be more enticing to an emerging personality after about 30 months of age.  Just saying, she gets it.
  2. Potty training success opens meaningful doors for kids, diapers keep them back.  Some great activities and some wonderful schools demand continence to attend.  By the time your child is around 3, they can feel inferior if they aren’t trained, but not be able to tell you.  They express it with anxiety or anger.  If you interpret it as not being ready, you aren’t helping them.
  3. Some kids will NEVER be ready on their own.  I know I am going to get some pushback on this one, and she already says she gets hate mail for saying it.  But there is a small subset of kids who will need your firm and loving direction to get started.   Waiting for readiness isn’t who they are.  If you are the parent of one of these kids, you know she’s right.  Your kid hasn’t been ready for any transition or change.  You have had to help them and then they were fine.  But this is who they are, and instead of waiting until the school makes you train her or your in-laws say something critical to your child, it might be OK to make things happen rather than waiting.
  4. You must believe that you are doing the right thing by training your child.  They can smell your uncertainty, and it will sink your ship.  She really sold me on her book with this one.  As a pediatric therapist, I know that my confidence is key when instructing parents in treatment techniques for a home program.  If I don’t know that I am recommending the right strategy, I know my doubt will show and nothing will go right.

If you are looking for some ideas on training kids of all stripes and needs, check out my posts  For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up and Toilet Training For Preschool And Stuck in Neutral? Here’s Why…...  Of course, if your child has low muscle tone or hypermobility, my e-book will help you understand why things seem so much harder, and what you can do to make potty training a success!

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Deluxe Water Wow Pads Offer More Challenge And More Fun To Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

 

91Wl4b-x3nL._SX425_.jpgMy clients and colleagues know how much I love the original Water Wow books.  They are reusable and mess-free fun for kids at home, at the doctor’s office, the restaurant and the plane ride.  These bigger books are going to be even more fun for preschool kids and kindergarteners!

Here are some great reasons why I love these books:

  • They have more pages, and more pages means they keep kids busy (and happy) longer.
  • They offer more detail and more challenge.  The graphics inspire critical thought (Is this a silly thing to find in the supermarket or not?) and the red lens that looks like a magnifying glass makes kids feel like Sherlock Holmes as they search for secret items.
  • There are mazes, hidden items and pages where kids can compare two almost-identical pictures and find the anomalies.  It is more than just wiping water on a picture.
  • Like the originals, the pages dry quickly and can be used over and over.  It seems like kids would get bored after the first run-through, but children can enjoy the “reveal” and the sensory play of water on a page for a long time after they have solved all the puzzles.  If you are at 30K feet and your kid is getting restless, this could buy you a bit of time without having to resort to screens that they will insist on for the rest of the (expensive) trip.  Genius.
  • Oh, and the pen is easy to grasp, and it develops a mature pencil grasp with repeated use.  Yeah!

I think these would be terrific holiday gifts.  If you are looking for more gift ideas, read Automoblox: For the Discriminating Preschool Gearhead and Melissa And Doug Tape Activity Book Is Reusable Fun for some other good toys that build skills while having fun!

For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up

 

photo-1453342664588-b702c83fc822For children with either low muscle tone or spasticity, toilet training can be a real challenge.  If it isn’t clothing management or making it to the potty on time, they can have a hard time perceiving that NOW is the time to start heading to the toilet.

Why?  Often, their interoception isn’t terrific.  What is interoception?  Think of it like proprioception, but internal.  It’s the ability to identify and interpret sensory information coming from organs and internal tissues.  Among them, the pressure of a full bladder or a full colon.  If you can’t feel and interpret sensation correctly, your only clue that you need the potty is when your pants are soiled.  Uh-oh.  A child with muscle tone issues is almost certainly going to have sensory issues.  Tone will affect the amount and quality of sensory feedback from their body.

What can you do to help kids?  The simplest, and the fastest solution I have found, is to tell them to stand up and see if they have changed their mind.  Why?  Because in a sitting position, the force of a full bladder or colon on the abdominal wall and the pelvic floor isn’t as intense.  Gravity and intra-abdominal pressure increase those sensations in standing.  More sensation can lead to more awareness.

So the next time your child tells you they don’t have to “go”, ask them to stand up and reconsider their opinion.  Now, if they are trying to watch a show or play a game, you aren’t going to get very far.  So make sure that they don’t have any competition for their attention!

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Well, I wrote the (e) book!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone gives you readiness checklists and ways to make readiness actually happen.  It has strategies you can use today to start making progress, regardless of your child’s level of communication and mobility.  Learn what occupational therapists know about how to teach this essential skill!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, on Amazon and on a terrific site for therapists and parents Your Therapy Source.  Read more about my unique book:The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Universal Design For Parents of Special Needs Kids: It’s Important for You Too!

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Stunning, but how many potential safety problems can YOU spot?

I just finished the coursework for my CAPS certification (certified aging-in-place specialist)!  Amazing instructor and loads of valuable information about construction and renovation that only the National Association of Home Builders could impart.   And not just for aging-in-place; the concepts of accessibility make homes more visitable for family and friends, and more livable and adaptable for the future.   Now I have to decide how to add this knowledge to my practice to help families make their lives easier and better….might as well start blogging about it now!

Universal design is more visible in public places.  Hotels are installing features that make showers more accessible and banks are providing variable-height counters to fill out deposit slips.   But most of us don’t think that we need universal or accessible design in our own homes as non-disabled adults.  Wrong.

Universal design allows your great-grandmother more ease when she wants to meet your baby in your own home.  It helps your neighbor with multiple sclerosis come over and water your plants when you take the kids to Disney.  And it allows you to carry a kid, carry a bag and pull the dog into the house without dropping one of them.  Universal design also allows your husband, who tore his achilles tendon during a pickup basketball game, to get into the shower by himself while he decides if he can admit he’s not 25 anymore.

 But for parents of kids with special needs, the need is two-fold: universal design helps them do a demanding physical job, but it also allows their children more independence earlier. These parents are lifting and carrying heavier children than they might otherwise.  In and out of the car, the crib, the stroller and more.  There is a big difference between lifting a 20-pound toddler and a 47-pound preschool child wearing heavy AFOs.  Parents are hauling around equipment like therapeutic strollers, standers and medical equipment every day.  I have written a bit about positioning your child How To Get Your Special Needs Child To Sit Safely In The Tub and Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers , but now I will be addressing design beyond equipment.

Universal design’s principles of low physical effort and adequate size/space for approach and use will give enough room at a landing for the stroller, and the parent, and the dog.  It will make it possible for your child to open the door for himself and to reach the sink without being held up to the water.   Universal design’s principles of equitable and flexible use will allow children more access with less assistance as they build skills.  The principles of simple and intuitive use, tolerance for error and perceptible information reduces confusion and safety risk to children.  A good example would be faucets with both temperature control valves to prevent scalding and handles marked with red/blue codes instead of H/C.  No reading interpretation is required once your child knows “red is hot” or “red is stop”.  That happens easier and earlier than reading skills.

I don’t hear a lot of parents complain about the wear-and-tear on their bodies as they care for their children, but I see it.  Parents: don’t think that because you don’t say anything that your occupational therapist isn’t aware that your back is giving out.  That is a shame, because OTs could be helpful to parents in this situation.  Not in telling them to hire help, but in teaching them how to move with more ease and how to select and use equipment based on universal design principles to make life better for everyone.

Maybe after this post, I will be hearing from all those parents who go to bed tired and wondering how they will be able to keep up with the physical demands of special needs parenting over the years to come.

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What Psychologists Just Don’t Get About Raising Gifted Toddlers

myung-won-seo-675403-unsplashI can’t take it any longer.  If I hear one more professional on YouTube say that the difficulties begin when your child enters school, I am gonna cry.  Real tears.  For those younger kids.  And their parents.

CNN just ran a story in which a psychologist suggested not telling kids that they are “that special”.  To help them feel more like other kids.  Well, I can tell you straight up that a child who feels empathy for the rocks and the kids in far-off countries, or who cannot tolerate the intense lighting or sounds in his classroom, is WAITING to understand why this is happening.  Knowing that it is commonly a part of being gifted would be a relief, not a burden.  But this professional might not know the range of experiences that giftedness brings, only the scores on the test.

Ask a parent of a gifted toddler how easy their life is, or how easy their child’s life is, and you will very often hear a tale of frustration and sometimes even exhaustion.  The life of a super-quick mind at 1 and 2 isn’t all charming enrichment activities at the zoo and the museum.  Sure, it isn’t as difficult as when they are 7 and have no friends to discuss paleontology with, or no one to play soccer with at 5 because their skills so exceed everyone else, but it is still not that easy.

Here are a few situations that make raising (and being) a very young gifted child a struggle that can be misinterpreted as temperament or developmental issues:

  1. Gifted development is often extremely asynchronous at this age.  Translation: “all over the place”.  Gifted toddlers can be delayed in their motor skills and hugely advanced in their reasoning or language skills. Or the other way around. They can have sensory sensitivities that create tolerance issues to tags, lights, noise and more.  Either way, it can be hard to be in a body that doesn’t match your mind.  And hard to raise a child with asynchronous development.  A child’s seemingly never-ending frustration about what they can’t accomplish and their strong skills that cannot be acted on make things tough at home and school.  For example, a child that can read chapter books at 2.5 into the night, but needs to sleep for 10 hours so they aren’t angry and exhausted tomorrow is going to give you a real argument.  Like a Supreme Court-level argument.  Again and again, night after night.  Gifted toddlers often like circle time because they get to answer questions, but they might refuse to participate in activities that they find boring.  They are seen as oppositional or even assumed to be unable to participate, when if fact they find sticking cotton balls on paper silly.
  2. Toys for typical young children anticipate normal, evenly displayed development.  This means that the knobs on microscopes and the gears on building toys aren’t made for the toddler who can conceive of an amazing building.  The toys they want aren’t great for them and they toys they can manage are not exciting.  Unless….they take them apart or melt them down to make something else. OOPS!
  3. Very young gifted children who are supposed to be developing social skills like sharing and cooperating are distinctly not motivated to do so with peers that are still non-verbal or have limited imaginative abilities.   If they have access to older kids, they may be thrilled to have playmates a few years ahead of them, but if they don’t, they are more likely to avoid their peers.  Parents are tasked with finding children that their gifted toddler can enjoy in play, and handle the questions from other parents about why their child simply “doesn’t like playing with my kid?  That is beyond awkward.  It sounds like boasting to a lot of people, but when your child is bored with his peers, it’s a real social problem for everybody!
  4. Parents find the high energy level and interactional demands exhausting.  Not all young gifted kids are like the Sheldon Cooper character on Big Bang Theory.  Lots of gifted toddlers love to ask questions and discuss things, love to be active all day long.  They aren’t old enough to roam the web or go to the library.  They want your attention.  Short naps and even short sleep cycles without any fatigue or behavior problems are one way to spot a gifted toddler.  Those brains don’t always need as much sleep as typically developing kids.  That means a lot more demands on parents and caregivers.  If you have been dogged all day by a toddler that won’t let go of a discussion, you might wish (a bit) that your kid wasn’t so S-M-A-R-T!

Why don’t psychologists seem to get this?  I am going to go out on a limb and say that unless they have raised their own gifted kids, they don’t interact with very young gifted kids in their clinics or research facilities.  Until they can formally test them, they aren’t on the radar of these professionals.  But it doesn’t mean they don’t exist.  Out here in the real world, I treat about 3 toddlers that appear to be highly gifted each year.  And I see what struggles they and their families go through.

 

Read more about gifted children and the challenges of being gifted in How To Spot A Gifted Child In Your Preschool Class (Or Your Living Room!) and How To Talk So Your Gifted Child Will Listen.

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