Category Archives: low tone

How To Correctly Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit”

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Hypermobile kids, kids with low muscle tone, and kids with sensory processing issues are champion “W-sitters”.  What’s that?  If your child sits with their thighs rotated inward, knees bent, and their feet rotated so their toes point outward, you have a W-sitter.   This sitting pattern isn’t abnormal if it is only one of many positions your child uses while playing on the floor.  It really isn’t.  But if it is the ONLY  way they like to sit, the only way they are able to sit without falling over, or the only way they are comfortable sitting on the floor, you may have a problem.

What kind of problems?

Persistent W-sitting can tighten hip and leg muscles to the point at which walking is negatively affected.  It also overstretches and discourages the development of the muscles needed for good walking and postural control.  It can loosen important hip and knee ligaments that are also essential for walking.  W-sitting inhibits active trunk muscle activation (that core thing again!).  We all know that having a weak core is a problem for good quality movement.  And finally…poor gait quality is a safety issue.  More falls, more tripping, more leaning on things and people.  Read Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing for a deeper dive into safety awareness.

There is a sensory impact as well.

What isn’t always so obvious is that having a weak core and only using a sitting position that locks the lower body into a collapsed position tells a sensory-sensitive kid that their brain is telling the truth; they are vulnerable and it is not that easy or safe to move.  This inhibits movement exploration and opportunities to build balance, strength, etc.

So….What is the best way to reposition your child’s legs?

  1. Don’t pull their feet out and around.  If your kid has issues such as hypermobility, you may be contributing to more joint problems if you place force on delicate tissue.
  2. You can demonstrate alternate sitting patterns and see if they will copy your position.  This requires the language, cognitive and motor skills to do so, and the willingness to comply.  Young children and special needs kids may not be able to follow your directions.  Some parents tell their child “Legs out” or “Fix your feet” and they slowly learn what that means.
  3. Try practicing regularly and rewarding other sitting patterns.  Praise will work for some kids but not all kids.  You know if you have a child that will take the bait.
  4. Tilt their trunk to one side, and wait for their brain to elicit a “righting reaction”; kicking the opposite leg out and forward.  Repeat on the other side.  A child with CP may not be able to overcome their spasticity to perform this, but you certainly can try it with any child.  If your child fights you on this, tip them to the side faster so that the reflexive response happens before they realize it, and use all your Happiest Toddler techniques Use The Fast Food Rule For Better Attunement With Your Child to decrease the oppositional behavior.
  5. Think of other more dynamic positions for play.  Read Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters)

 

Looking for more help with your hypermobile child?

I wrote an e-book for you!  The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is finally available!  It helps parents understand how hypermobility affects behavior, safety, attention and learning.  Filled with practical strategies, this book gives parents the confidence to pick out the best high chairs, trikes, desks, and even pajamas to build their child’s safety and independence.  Read more, and see a short preview of chapter three, here:The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

 It is available on Amazon as a read-only download or on Your Therapy Source as a printable and clickable download.

Does Your Older Child Hate Writing? Try HWT’s Double-Lined Paper

 

This paper has been more useful to older kids (6+) that I see for handwriting help than any other paper on the market, and almost any other tool Problems With Handwriting? You Need The Best Eraser , Great Mechanical Pencils Can Improve Your Child’s Handwriting Skills .  Why?  Regular lined paper, and almost all worksheets, are usually jam-packed with lines.  Red lines, green lines, lines with airplanes and worms.  There are papers designed by occupational therapists that are even more complex than the mass-market choices.

All this is often visual noise to kids with sensory processing issues and ocular or visual-perceptual issues.  These problems are sometimes subtle and appear to be behavioral.  The kids who “hate to write”.  The kids who look away when you are demonstrating how to write a letter or spell a word.  The kids who cannot seem to remember where to start a letter, even after repeated practice.  These children often do much better with HWT’s double-lined paper.

Let’s drill down into the design of this unique paper:

  • Double-lined paper provides just two lines; the baseline and the midline.  Knowing where to start uppercase letters and tall lowercase letters is important, and this paper encourages practice and awareness while still giving some structure to writing.
  • There is a wide empty space between sets of lines.  This is intentional; children have room to place the tails of lowercase “y” and “j”, for example, without blocking the uppercase or tall lowercase letters of the next line of writing.  For many kids, not knowing what to do about crowding and spacing is a good reason to stop trying to write well, or sometimes even write at all.
  • This sturdy paper is pre-punched to be used in a 3-ring binder.  The quality of the paper is very high, which means that it doesn’t tear easily when a child erases a mistake.  Most schools provide the thinnest paper for teachers to use as handouts, creating the potential for a disaster when given to a child that struggles with grading their force on an eraser, or makes multiple errors in a word.
  • Brains get practice in sizing and proportion.  Once kids have a pattern of letter formation, it is easier to accomplish without the extra midline.  But so many kids need that “training wheel” effect much longer than scrolls recognize.  Many kids need a day or two of double-lined paper use to start understanding the way a letter “h” is twice as tall as a letter “a” and the same size but aligned differently than the letter “y”.  Of course, pointing it out is important, and so is working on other writing qualities such as letter and word spacing.
  • Kids write faster.  Because they are guided to proportion and start letters correctly, they don’t waste time thinking about it or erasing incorrect letters.  Again, this doesn’t mean their brain isn’t taking it all in.  If that were true, we would start every kid on single-lined paper in preschool.
  • There are three line sizes, so you don’t have to abandon the double-lines when your kid enter middle school.  I will admit that I wish the pre-k/K paper were thicker.  But it is still fairly sturdy.
  • You can alternate using this paper with single-lined paper to see when to “take the training wheels off” and stop using double-lined paper.  Kids should always have a chance to practice with standard paper, but when the choice is between fighting and crying, and quickly executing a homework assignment, it is no contest.

 

The best paper wins.

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When Writing Hurts: The Hypermobile Hand

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Many children resist doing their homework, but most kids say “Its so BORING!” not “My hand hurts too much”.  If a child is complaining of pain, and they don’t have a joint disease such as JRA, the first thought is hypermobility.  The good news is that there are a few fast fixes that can decrease or even eliminate hand pain.

It is rare that hypermobility in the hand is directly addressed at the preschool level unless it is generalized throughout the body or severely reduces pencil grasp.  Many children have atypical grasp patterns when they cannot achieve the required stability for a standard pencil grasp.  Children with mild instability and no other developmental issues may still be able to write legibly and even fast enough to complete assignments in the early grades.  It is when the volume of work increases or the joint stability decreases that therapists get a request for service.

Here are a few strategies that can support hypermobile kids to write with less pain:

  1. Use a tabletop easel.  These can be foldable or static.  They support not just the wrist and forearm, but also the shoulder and trunk.  The angle of an easel both supports correct wrist positioning and decreases strain on the wrist and hand.  Some easels come with clips that hold the paper, but they should be placed on an angle to mirror the natural arm position.  This will require more table space, so be aware that the size of the easel could be an issue.  Simple hack:  use a three-ring binder as an easel.
  2. Enlarge the width of the pencil shaft.  My favorite pencils for grades 1+ (see photo above) have a standard #2 lead, but a wider shaft. Joint protection principles tell us that avoiding a closed joint position should lead to less strain on joints and supporting ligament structures.  You could use some of the adaptive pens available, but I find kids reject these as looking strange.  Of course, if you enlarge the shaft oo much you will find that it is more awkward, not less.  Think of those novelty pencils you buy in gift stores on vacation.  Cute but useless.  Nobody really writes with anything that thick.  Match the child’s hand size to the pencil.
  3. Increase the texture of the pencil shaft for easier grip, less pain, and more endurance.   Everyone has seen the rubbery grips you slip onto a pencil.  You can slide 3-4 onto the entire shaft, or add some tape to create a non-slip surface.  I have been adding kineseotape or Dycem to handles this year, with good results.  You are battling grasp stability, but also fatigue.  A hand that is tired is a hand that experiences more pain.  Adding texture reduces the amount of force needed for proprioceptive registration (a fancy way of saying that kids need to squeeze to fully feel what is in their hand).  Reducing force reduces pain and fatigue.
  4. Teach pacing.  Kids think that the faster they write, the faster they will be out of pain.  Breaking up the work can have better results, but it isn’t natural for children to pace themselves.  In fact, I have never seen a young child do so.  You have to teach this to kids who likely will have joint instability throughout their school years.  A schedule, a timer, organizing assignments and breaking them down into heavy writing choices and light writing choices all help.
  5. Splinting can be a real option.  Not a heavy plastic or metal splint (usually).  A neoprene splint can be a lightweight supportive choice.  These splints are comfortable and washable.  These are affordable without insurance for most families, and your OT can help you decide if this is a worthwhile pursuit.  They are durable but easily lost by younger children, so not all families send one to school.  But the support is real, and kids that have been told for years to “fix your fingers” can feel relieved that they can now focus on writing and composing on the paper.

For more information on hypermobility, read The Hypermobile Hand: More Than A Strength Problem and For Kids With Hypermobility, “Listen To Your Body” Doesn’t Teach Them To Pace Themselves. Here’s What Really Helps.

Looking for more assistance with hypermobility?  My new e-book is coming out this summer, and it will address the issues of the early years (0-5).  The series will continue with school age kids and teens.  But you don’t have to wait; visit my website tranquil babies and request a consultation to discuss your child’s treatment plan and make a better plan that works for everyone…today!

Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing

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Therapists always try hard to be optimistic when discussing their pediatric client’s future.  Why not?  Kids have amazing potential, and we aren’t fortune tellers; there are so many things that can go right.

As therapists, we also should share the reality of how bad choices create unfortunate consequences.  Among them are the long-term results of falls, especially head injuries.  Kids fall, kids trip, kids walk into things.  All kids, and for much of early childhood.  The hypermobile child will have more episodes of injury, often has greater injury occurring in each episode, and frequently experiences a slower or less complete recovery from injury.  This isn’t a criticism of parents, kids, or even acute medical care.  It is the reality of living with a condition, often a syndrome, that has effects beyond just loose joints.

This can include connective tissue disorders that create weak skin, ligaments, and tendons, decreased pain registration, delayed protective reactions when falling, and cognitive or behavioral complications that make learning and controlling actions more difficult.  Hypermobile kids often spend more years in an unstable state in which they need assistance and supervision.  And more years when they are vulnerable to serious injury.  A head injury or a spine injury isn’t an “unfortunate” event.  It is frequently a life-changing event.  The course of education and employment can be forever altered.  For the worse.

In a clinic or school setting, your therapist is bound to guidelines that indemnify them and the facility. While they cannot control what happens at home, you should know what to do to make your home safer for a child with hypermobility.  It begins with your environment, then you change your responses, then your build  your child’s ability to incorporate safety awareness into their day.

  • Create a safe but accessible home.  This expands on “baby proofing” to include railings set at a height that allow your child to push up rather than hang on them.  Removal of loose rugs and adding padded floor surfaces in common areas, especially areas where they are climbing or running.  Bathrooms are the location for many injuries once children become independent in toileting or bathing.  Instead of supervising them forever, create a safe place with hidden grab bars (there are toilet paper holders and towel racks that are actually grab bars) and non-slip flooring.  Place needed items within easy reach without climbing.
  • Teach safe movement from the start.  Children that learn how to move versus children that are passively moved will have more safety awareness.  For children that still need a lot of help, narrate your moves and weave in safety messages.  It will sink in.  Finally, don’t allow unsafe moves, even if they didn’t hurt themselves.  Tell them to try it again the safe way.  Read Joint Protection And Hypermobility: Investing in Your Child’s Future to learn what to teach them.  Children are unable to anticipate the results of their actions.  This is why we don’t let 12 year-olds drive or let 5 year-olds cross the street alone.  Sometimes the reason they do things our way is because we said so.  Until they are old enough to understand the “why”.
  • Share your thought processes with children as soon as they can wrap their heads around things.  Even kids in preschool can follow along with the idea that too many “boo-boos” will stop them from being able to play.  Older kids can learn that the right chair helps them stave off fatigue until they finish a game.  Children don’t pick up on subtle cues, so don’t be subtle.  Be direct.
  • Ask your therapists for specific safety advice, and then carefully think through their answers.  The truth is that some therapists are more safety-aware than others.  I have been told that I am one of the most vocal therapists on a team when regarding safety issues.  Perhaps it is because I spent 10 years working in adult rehab, treating patients for problems that started decades before I met them.  I have seen what overuse and poor design has cost people.  By then it is often too late to do much more than compensation and adaptation.  I am committed to prevention with my pediatric clients.  The cost is too high not to say something and say it loud.

Looking for more practical information on raising your hypermobile child?

I wrote an e-book for YOU!

The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One The Early Years is my newest e-book, filled with strategies to empower parents with useful knowledge written in plain English.  Learn about correct positioning to improve control and how to make your home safer for your child.  Learn how to pick out the best seating, clothing, and even tricycles to maximize independence.

This unique book is available as a read-only download on Amazon or as a click-able and printable e-book on Your Therapy Source.  Don’t have a Kindle?  Don’t worry; Amazon’s downloads are easy to read on any tablet or phone.

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Does Your Child Still Chew on Clothes or Toys?

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Babies love to munch on their toys.  They nibble at book bindings, chew the heck out of their loveys, and some little ones really love to chew their pacifiers.  As they grow, most children let go of this behavior.  Chewing and biting for sensory exploration and state modulation diminishes and a child’s behavior evolves into thinking, communicating, and smooth internal state regulation.

But some older kids slip their sleeve or shirt collar into their mouth whenever they can, and are left with a soggy mess by the end of the day.  They suck on their markers or the grocery store cart.  Their toys and pencils are ragged witnesses to the continuing use of oral stimulation, long past the first year or two of life.

Why do they do this?

Some kids are seeking to fill an oral cavity that is less stimulated due to low muscle tone, hypermobility and/or limited sensory discrimination.  Shoving a sleeve in there provides that sensory boost as muscles, skin and ligaments stretch.  Children that need more sensory input due to inactivity, boredom, physical limitations and illness use oral input as an always-available and independent option.  Other kids use biting and chewing to modulate their level of arousal (and open their eustachian tubes, BTW!).  While most OTs know about the modulation piece, the way biting and chewing impact hearing and even vestibular health isn’t so commonly considered.  Biting can stem nystagmus for some kids, and it can lessen dizziness or help a child move their eyes apart as they watch objects in the distance (divergence) for reading the board and for sports.  For kids that use biting well after the toddler biting phase should be over, evaluating any ocular (eye) or ENT issues can be helpful.

Exploring the level of stress in a child’s life outside the classroom or therapy clinic is another consideration.  Biting and chewing are calming proprioceptive inputs that a child can use when they are anxious or fearful, or just uncertain. The jaw muscles have innervations to the autonomic nervous system and the auditory system.  Kids who struggle with language processing can use biting and chewing to assist them in listening to you or in tolerating sound.   It may not be possible to impact the stress of divorce, moving to a new home, or adding a newborn to the family, but appreciating these situations as factors in behavior can improve how families, teachers and therapists respond.  Older children could be trying to modulate their level of arousal without causing trouble by running, jumping or yelling.  Chewing is less likely to be disruptive in a classroom setting.

What Can You Do Once a Chewing Habit is Established?

Once oral sensory seeking behavior takes hold, it isn’t easy to stop.  It can be very satisfying and accessible, particularly for young children.  Addressing the core cause or causes means taking things one step at a time.  Many children do well with a multi-sensory diet added to their daily activities.  More physical activity or more frequent activity breaks can help.  I find that more vestibular input in particular can be powerful.  Using whistles can be helpful when chosen well and supervised for safety and overall modulation.   Some children need to become more aware of their behaviors; older kids can use some of the “How Does Your Engine Run?” concepts to take responsibility for their behaviors and independently seek alternative sensory input.  Kids that learn mindfulness techniques can incorporate those into their program as well.

The use of chewing objects can help, but there are three concerns that have to be addressed:  hygiene, safety, and speech.  A child that sucks or chews on any object isn’t going to monitor its cleanliness, so make sure you use non-toxic soap that is carefully rinsed off.  A chewing necklace should never be worn while sleeping due to safety issues, nor can it be used when it could become snagged on branches or sports equipment.  And finally, having something in the mouth, whether it is a pacifier or a chewing toy, will minimize and alter speech if it isn’t removed for communication.  Never allow a child who is talking or learning to talk to devolve into head nods so they can keep chewing.

Looking for more information on sensory issues?  Read Sensory Sensitivity In Toddlers: Why Responding Differently to “Yucky!” Will Help Your Child and Weaning the Pacifier From An Older Child.

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Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child?

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Affordable accessibility and no institutional appearance!

I know that some of you don’t even realize that such a thing exists:  a toilet sized for preschoolers and kindergarteners!  Well, you won’t find it in Lowe’s or Home Depot on the showroom floor, but you can buy them online, and it is an option to consider.  Here are the reasons you might put one in your child’s main bathroom:

  1. You have the space already.  Some homes are large enough to allow each bedroom to have its own bathroom.   If you have the option, it might be worth it during renovations.  It shouldn’t add considerably to the overall cost, and it should not be that difficult to swap out when your child grows.  If you have a bathroom near the playroom, that might be another good location for this potty.  Most older kids and adults can make it to another half-bath on that floor, but it might be perfect for your younger child and his friends!
  2. Your child is terrified of the standard-height potty.  Some kids are unstable, some are afraid of heights, and some have such poor proprioception and/or visual skills that they really, really need their feet on the ground, not on a footstool.
  3. Your child was a preemie, and their growth pattern indicates that they will fit on this toilet comfortably for a while.  Some preemies catch up, and some stay on the petite size.  Those children will be able to use a preschool-right potty into early elementary school.  Even if your preemie is average in size, they may have issues such as vision or sensory sensitivity that will make this potty a great idea for a shorter time.

I am just beginning to build my materials to do in-home consultations as a CAPS, but I think that an underserved population are parents of special needs kids that would benefit from universal design and adaptive design.  This toilet would come under the category of adaptive design, and it is an easily affordable solution for some children.  Having more comfort on the toilet speeds up training for many kids.  It also decreases the aggravation of training and monitoring safety for parents.  I am very committed to helping the entire family have an easier time of things like toilet training.

Think about what your family’s needs and capabilities are, and if you are planning to remodel or build a new home, consider finding a CAPS professional in your area to help you make your home as welcoming for your special needs child as possible!  For more information, read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child.

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The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem

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Many different ways to use Dycem!

In adult rehab, occupational therapists are regularly providing patients who have incoordination, muscle weakness or joint instability with both skill-building activities and adaptive equipment such as Dycem.  In pediatrics, you see a predominance of skills training.  Adaptive equipment shows up primarily for the most globally and pervasively disabled children.  I think that should change. Why?  Because frustration is an impediment to learning, and adaptive equipment can be like training wheels; you can take them off as skills develop.  When kids aren’t constantly frustrated, they are excited to try harder and feel supported by adults, not aggravated.

 

What Dycem Can Do For Your Child

Dycem isn’t a new product, but you hardly ever see it suggested to kids with mild to moderate motor incoordination, low tone, sensory processing disorders, hypermobility, and dyspraxia.  We let these kids struggle as their cereal bowl spills and their crayons roll away from them.  Dycem matting is a great tool for these kids.  It is grippy on both sides, but it is easy to clean.  Place a terrific bowl or plate on it OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues, and it won’t tip over with gentle pressure, and not even if the surface has a slight incline.  It lasts a long time, and can be cut into any shape needed for a booster seat tray or under the base of a toy like a dollhouse or a toy garage.  Placing a piece of Dycem under your child while they are sitting on a tripp trap chair or a cube chair A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato ChairThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat! will help them keep their pelvis stable while they eat and play.  The bright color contrasts with most objects, supporting kids with visual deficits and poor visual perceptual skills.  It catches their eye and their attention.  As you can see, Dycem has a lot to offer children and parents.

How To Use Dycem To Build Motor Skills

Will it prevent all spills or falls?  No.  But it will decrease the constant failures that cause children to give up and request your help, or cause them to refuse to continue trying.  Children are creating their self-image earlier than you realize, so helping them see themselves as competent is essential.  Will it teach kids not to use their non-dominant hand to stabilize objects?  Not if an adult uses it correctly.  Introducing Dycem at the appropriate stage in motor development and varying when and where it is used is the key.  Children need lots of different types of situations in order to develop bilateral control, and as long as they are given a wide variety of opportunities, offering them adaptive equipment during key activities isn’t going to slow them down.  It will show them that we are supporting them on their journey.  When kids are new to an activity or a skill and need repeated successes to keep trying, Dycem can help them persevere.  When children are moving to the next level of skill and see that they are struggling more, Dycem can support them until they master this new level.

Should you buy the pre-cut mats or the roll of Dycem?  It depends on your needs.  Be aware that Dycem doesn’t stay tacky forever, so the cheaper strategy is the roll.

The Cheap Hack:  Silicone Mats

I will often recommend the use of silicone baking mats instead of dycem.  These inexpensive mats often do the job at a lower cost, and can be easily replaced if lost at daycare or school.  Dycem is a specialty item that can be purchased online but not in most stores.  Silicone mats aren’t as grippy, but they are easily washed and dried.  Some families are averse to anything that looks like adaptive equipment, so I may introduce these mats first to build a parent’s confidence in my recommendations.

Looking for more information on helping your child build self-care and safety awareness?

I wrote 2 e-books for you!

The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone and The JointSmart Child: Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One: The Early Years are unique books that both educate and empower you.

They are filled with understandable explanations for the challenges and all the confusion that comes up during ADL training.   When you aren’t provided with enough information on the motor, sensory and behavioral consequences of low tone and hypermobiilty, you can’t effectively help your child achieve the basic self-care and safety awareness skills that every child needs.  My books have checklists and forms that help you communicate with your babysitters, teachers, even your child’s doctors.

Both books are sold on Amazon.com  as read-only downloads, and on Your Therapy Source   as printable and click-able downloads.  Your Therapy Source also sells both books together as a discounted bundle, saving you money and giving you lots of information all at once!

 

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Could Your Pediatric Client Have a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue?

 

vincent-van-zalinge-752646-unsplashTherapists see lots of hypermobile kids in clinics and schools.  I see hypermobile children  every week in their homes for private sessions, consultations and ongoing treatment through Early Intervention.  My estimate is that at least 25% of kids over 5 and almost 50% of the younger kids I have treated have some degree of hypermobility.  But young children are naturally more flexible than older kids, and there are other diagnoses that include hypermobility.  What would cause  a therapist to suspect a rare CTD when so many children have this one symptom?

You observe the systemic signs and symptoms that could indicate an HDCT, and you ask their parent(s) for details about their health and activities.  You will need far more information than you can get from your intake evaluation to explore the possibility of a heritable disorder of connective tissue.

Here are a few of the more common current or past indicators of a HDCT:

  • Multiple joint involvement.  Not just lax hands, but laxity at many joints, both small and large at times.
  • Skin that is either very smooth, very thin, or bruises easily, and bruises in places that are not common sites for active children.  For example, shins and dorsal forearms are commonly bruised in play.  The medial aspect of the thigh and the volar forearm, not so much.  It is not uncommon for ER staff to incorrectly suspect abuse when they see this pattern, so be aware that as a mandated reporter, you have to ask more questions before you make that call.
  • Sensory processing issues that are primarily poor proprioception, sensory seeking and perhaps poor vestibular functioning.  Children with a HDCT may have no sensory sensitivity and no modulation issues, and good multi-sensory processing.  Why good?  The more information they receive, the less the impact of poor proprioceptive input makes on performance.  With good positioning and support, their sensory issues seem to significantly disappear or are eliminated Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior.
  • Lower GI issues or incontinence issues.  These kids may have more toilet training problems and more issues with digestion than your micro-preemies at ages 4 or 5.  Girls may have a history of UTIs, and both genders can take a long time to be continent all night Teach Kids With EDS Or Low Tone: Don’t Hold It In! You may hear about slow GI motility or a lot of sensitivity to foods that are not common allergens in children.
  • Dental issues such as bleeding gums or weak enamel.  Remember, if it is a CTD, then there will be problems with many kinds of tissue, not just skin or tendons.  Read Hypermobile Child? Simple Dental Moves That Make a Real Difference in Your Child’s Health for more practical ideas.
  • Strabismus or amblyopia are more commonly seen in HDCT.
  • Really slow progress in therapy, even with great carryover and a solid team.
  • Recurrent injuries from low-impact activities that were well-tolerated the day before.   Micro-trauma can take a day to develop into pain, swelling or stiffness.  You  could see overuse trauma that doesn’t make sense at first, because the overuse is just regular levels of activity but for a CTD, this IS overuse.

Should you say something to a parent?  I don’t have a license to diagnose children, but I may contact their referring physician if I see many indications that a child needs more evaluation.  More directly, I can help parents manage the issues that fall within my practice area, and educate families about good joint protection, equipment choices, and body mechanics.

 If a child does have a HDCT diagnosis,  the current and future risks of certain sports and careers should be discussed with families.  As therapists, we know that early damage can contribute to significant impairment in decades to follow.  Just because a child isn’t experiencing severe pain now isn’t an indication of the safety of an activity.  Understanding the many ways to adapt and adjust to ensure maximal function and maximal preservation of function is embedded in every OT.  Adapt your treatment protocols to respect the nature of a CTD, such as in  Can You K-Tape Kids With Ehlers-Danlos and Other Connective Tissue Disorders?

We can make a difference for these kids and their families, but only if we know what we are really treating.

Are you a therapist looking for clinical guidance?  Visit my website tranquil babies and connect with me through a phone or video session.  With over 25 years of pediatric experience, I have probably tried all of the techniques you are considering, and treated children with the diagnoses that keep you guessing.  Make your treatment sessions more productive, and your treatment day easier, with some professional coaching today!

Are you a parent of a child with a CTD?  Or an adult with a CTD?  A coaching phone/video session may answer your questions about diagnosis and treatment, and help you craft a more successful home program.  This is not the same as a treatment session, but especially if you are getting private therapy services, you want to be an informed consumer and get targeted help from your healthcare providers.  Coaching can help you be that effective parent or patient.  Visit my website tranquil babies and get started today!

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Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way

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Hypermobile children end up in some impressively awkward positions.  It can feel uncomfortable just to look at the way their arms or legs are bent.   It can be an awkward position with any part of the body; shoulders that allow an arm to fold under the body and the child lies on top of the arm, crawling on the backs of the hands instead of the palms, standing on the sides of the feet, not the soles.

The mom of a child I currently treat told me that this topic is frequently appearing on her online parent’s group.  Mostly innocent questions of “Does your child do this too?”  and responses like “At least she is finally moving on her own”  When I met her child, she was rolling her head backward to such a degree that it was clearly a risk to her cervical (neck) spine.  We gradually decreased this behavior, and have almost eliminated it.  This child is using it to get attention when she is frustrated, not to explore movement or propel herself around the room.  Time to teach other ways to get an adult’s attention and express frustration.

Because of their extreme flexibility and the additional gradual stretching effects of these positions, most children will not register or report pain in these positions.  Those of us with typical levels of flexibility can’t quite imagine that they aren’t in pain.  Unfortunately, because of their decreased proprioception Hypermobility and Proprioception: Why Loose Joints Create Sensory Processing Problems for Children and decreased sense of stability, many hypermobile kids will intentionally get into these awkward postures as they seek more sensory input.  It can actually feel good to them to feel something!

The fact that your child isn’t in pain at the moment doesn’t mean that there isn’t damage occurring as you watch them contort their bodies, but the underlying inflammation and injury may only be perceived later, and sometimes not for years.  Possibly not until tissue is seriously damaged, or a joint structure is injured.  Nobody wants that to happen. Read   Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing.  If you think that there is a chance that your child is more than just loose-limbed, ask your therapist to read Could Your Pediatric Therapy Patient Have a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue? and get their opinion on whether to pursue more evaluations.  Some causes of hypermobility have effects on other parts of the body.  An informed parent is the best defense.

Here is what you can do about all those awkward postures:

  • Discuss this behavior with your OT or PT, or with both of them.  If they haven’t seen a particular behavior, take a photo or video on your phone.
  • Your professional team should be able to explain the risks, and help you come up with a plan.  For the child I mentioned above, we placed her on a cushion in a position where she could not initiate this extreme cervical hyperextension.  Then we used Dr. Harvey Karp’s “kind ignoring” strategy.  We turned away from her for a few seconds, and as soon as she stopped fussing, we offered a smile and a fun activity.  After a few tries, she got the message and the fussing was only seconds.  And it happens very infrequently now, not multiple times per day.
  • Inform everyone that cares for your child about your plan to respond to these behaviors, to ensure consistency.  Even nonverbal children learn routines and read body language.  Just one adult who ignores the behavior will make getting rid of a behavior much, much harder.
  • Find out as much as you can about safe positioning and movement.  Your therapists are experts in this area.  Their ideas may not be complicated, and they will have practical suggestions for you.  I will admit that not all therapists will approach you on this subject.  You may have to initiate this discussion and request their help.  There are posts on this blog that could help you start a conversation.  Read Three Ways To Reduce W-Sitting (And Why It Matters) and Kids With Low Muscle Tone: The Hidden Problems With Strollers  and How To Reposition Your Child’s Legs When They “W-Sit”.  Educate yourself so that you know how to respond when your child develops a new movement pattern that creates a new risk.  Kids are creative, but proactive parents can respond effectively!!

Looking for more information on hypermobility?

I wrote 2 e-books for you!

My first, The JointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume One:  The Early Years is your guide to helping your child develop independence and safety from birth through age 5.  Filled with practical strategies to help parents understand the complexities of hypermobility, it empowers parents every step of the way.  In addition to addressing all the basic self-care skills kids need to learn, it covers selecting chairs, trikes, even pajamas!  There are checklists for potty training and forms that parents can use to help communicate with teachers, therapists, family members…even doctors!

“Dr. Google” isn’t helping parents figure out how to help their kiss with PWS, SPD, ASD, Down syndrome, and all the other diagnoses that result in significant joint hypermobility.  This is the book that provides real answers in everyday language, not medical jargon.

Read more about this book, and get a peek at part of chapter 3 on positioning for success by reading The JointSmart Child Series: Parents of Young Hypermobile Children Can Feel More Empowered and Confident Today!

This unique e-book is available on Amazon as a read-only download or on Your Therapy Source as a printable and click-able download.  Feel more empowered and confident as a parent…today!

Is Your Hypermobile Child Older Than 5?  This is the E-book for You!

The jointSmart Child:  Living and Thriving With Hypermobility Volume Two: The School Years is a larger, more comprehensive book that helps the parents and therapists of older children ages 6-12 navigate school needs, build full ADL independence, and increase safety in all areas of life, including sports participation.  Need to know how to pick the right chair, desk, sport, even musical instrument?  Got it.  Want to feel empowered, not aggravated, at medical appointments?  Got that too!  There are forms and checklists that parents can use to improve school meetings and therapists can use for home programs and professional presentations.  Read more about it here: Parents and Therapists of Hypermobile School-Age Kids Finally Have a Practical Guidebook!

Get my newest book today on  Amazon .  Don’t have a Kindle?  Don’t worry:  Amazon has an easy method to load it onto your iPhone or iPad!

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Three Reasons Why Your Constipated Toddler May Also Have Bladder Accidents

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Kids with chronic constipation are a challenge to train.  It can often appear that withholding is the issue, and to be certain, fear and pain are real issues.  But there are some physiological problems caused by constipation that contribute to bladder problems, and they aren’t always what your pediatrician is thinking about.

  1. The constant fullness of the colon can lead to bladder misplacement.  The bladder can be compressed and even folded, depending on exactly where the blockages exist.  This is not good for any organ, but it is especially a problem for a hollow organ that should be filling and emptying regularly.   The sensation of fullness with a misplaced bladder is therefore corrupted, so the child is not receiving correct input.  They may feel that they “have to go”, only to have nothing in their bladder, or very little.  They may fill up really fast and have to run to the toilet before they have an accident.  Too many accidents, and a child can beg for that pull-up so that they aren’t embarrassed or inconvenienced.  Even the little ones are subject to shame that isn’t from you as a parent, but in comparison to older kids or sibling comments.
  2. Chronic constipation stretches the pelvic floor, and therefore there is both less stability and less control.  The pelvic floor muscles help us to hold the urine into the bladder in time to get to the toilet, in conjunction with the sphincters.  Poor control and poor awareness go hand-in-hand.  There are physical therapists that specialize in pelvic floor rehab, but this isn’t easy to do with children that have limited language.  Not impossible, but not easy.  Letting the problem go until they are older means risking years of psychological and physical stress.
  3. Withholding due to pain or fear is a huge issue, and it can become automatic.  This means that solving the constipation issue may not immediately result in continence.  Using a wide range of approaches, including manual therapy, behavioral strategies, medications and diet control, and even core stability and sensory processing strategies, may be needed.

My final comment is that chronic constipation is nothing to ignore.  It needs to be addressed well and early.  It often doesn’t solve itself, and it may need more than a spoonful of Metamucil to clear up.  Get help and request consultations early rather than waiting to see how things “go”!

For more information about toilet training, see For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up and The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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The Best Ride-On Toy For Younger (or Petite) Toddlers

 

61-g+QMVAYL._SL1000_.jpgAs an occupational therapist, I have always found it difficult to recommend a toddler ride-on toy for younger or smaller kids with low muscle tone and hypermobility.  Most of these toys have such a wide seat that children must propel themselves with their knees rotated out and pushing forward on their toes.  Exactly the pattern of movement we DON’T want to see.

And then I saw the Fly Bike.  This little fold-up bike has a seat that is about 9.5 inches high and has a very narrow seat.  This allows a child’s feet to be aligned with their hips, facilitating the development of hip and trunk control, not substituting bending forward and back to propel the toy.

The textured seat helps grip a child’s clothing for a little extra stability, and the small handlebars mean children aren’t draping their chest over the front of the toy; they are holding onto the handlebars with their hands.  Brilliant.  The rubber wheels are kind to indoor floors, but can handle pavement easily.

Are there children that don’t fit this toy?  Absolutely.  If your child is too tall for this toy, they shouldn’t use it.  If your child cannot maintain adequate sitting balance independently on this toy, they may need more support from another style of ride-on toy, perhaps with a larger seat and a backplate.

I finally have a great ride-on toy that I can recommend for smaller kids.  An early Xmas present to me and my little clients!

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A Great Toilet Training Book for Neurotypical Kids: Oh Crap Potty Training!

sean-wells-471209My readers know that I wrote an e-book on potty training kids with low tone ( The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! ) but I have to admit, I learn a lot from other authors.  Jamie Glowacki  has written a terrific book that speaks clearly and directly to parents who aren’t sure they are up to the challenge of toilet training.  Oh Crap Potty Training is a funny title, but it is filled with useful ideas that help parents understand their toddler better and understand training needs so they can tackle this major life skill with humor and love.  I have to admit, I am really happy that she suggests parents of kids with developmental issues ask their OT for advice.  So few parents actually do!

Here are a few of her concepts that illustrate why I like her book so much:

  1. She gets the situation toddlers find themselves in:  using the potty is a total change in a comforting daily routine.  Jamie points out that since birth, your child has only known elimination into a diaper.  The older they are when you start training, the longer they have been using diapers.  WE are excited to move them on, but they can be afraid to sit, afraid to fail, and afraid of the certainty of the diaper always being there.  You can’t NOT get it in the diaper!  She also gets the power struggle that can be more enticing to an emerging personality after about 30 months of age.  Just saying, she gets it.
  2. Potty training success opens meaningful doors for kids, diapers keep them back.  Some great activities and some wonderful schools demand continence to attend.  By the time your child is around 3, they can feel inferior if they aren’t trained, but not be able to tell you.  They express it with anxiety or anger.  If you interpret it as not being ready, you aren’t helping them.
  3. Some kids will NEVER be ready on their own.  I know I am going to get some pushback on this one, and she already says she gets hate mail for saying it.  But there is a small subset of kids who will need your firm and loving direction to get started.   Waiting for readiness isn’t who they are.  If you are the parent of one of these kids, you know she’s right.  Your kid hasn’t been ready for any transition or change.  You have had to help them and then they were fine.  But this is who they are, and instead of waiting until the school makes you train her or your in-laws say something critical to your child, it might be OK to make things happen rather than waiting.
  4. You must believe that you are doing the right thing by training your child.  They can smell your uncertainty, and it will sink your ship.  She really sold me on her book with this one.  As a pediatric therapist, I know that my confidence is key when instructing parents in treatment techniques for a home program.  If I don’t know that I am recommending the right strategy, I know my doubt will show and nothing will go right.

If you are looking for some ideas on training kids of all stripes and needs, check out my posts  For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up and Toilet Training For Preschool And Stuck in Neutral? Here’s Why…...  Of course, if your child has low muscle tone or hypermobility, my e-book will help you understand why things seem so much harder, and what you can do to make potty training a success!

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Playing With Toy Food That Connects With Velcro Builds Children’s Hand Skills Faster!

81OGGQRPz8L._SL1500_This set is one of my favorite choices for toddlers of all ages and interests.  Why?  It is a safe, fun, clean-able toy that doesn’t require a USB connection or a battery.  That isn’t a complete oddity, but it getting more rare every year.  This toy is a great choice for kids with ASD, SPD, low muscle tone and hypermobility.  And children will play with it for years.  I like recommending toys that have the possibility of wearing out before they are thrown out.

In this age of edible pouches and pre-cut meal packages, your child might not realize that corn comes on a cob, or that there is a purple food; eggplant.  Learning about food through play is a wonderful way to introduce food preparation and an interest in healthy food choices.

Let’s unpack the benefits of this great set:

  • The theme is food; familiar and fun for most kids.  It encourages imaginative play and can be used by more than one child at a time.
  • The materials are lightweight and easy to clean.  The food toys made of wood sound so great, so holistic …until your toddler has chucked one into the flat screen TV in your family room!  Or at his sister’s head!  And for kids who lick or suck on toys, well, I don’t think most kids should be consuming paint.  I’d prefer it if kids didn’t lick toys, but lots of them do from time to time.  Plastic is a better choice for kids with a weak grasp as well.  Some children will revert to an immature or atypical grasp on a heavy object but can sustain a mature grasp on a lightweight item.
  • Different ages can enjoy this toy.  Very young toddlers simply connect and disconnect the velcro pieces.  Slightly older kids can practice color matching, and preschool kids can practice cutting with the super-safe knife in the set.  Even older kids can create elaborate pretend play.  I have had three and four year-olds preparing a pretend Shabbos meal, using a Kleenex to cover the bread.  Adorable!
  • The shapes are primarily cylinders and spheres.  Why is that good for motor development?  The arches in the hand are developed by hand use, and grasping these shapes encourages the use of the intrinsic muscles, deep in the palm of the hand.  Along with the thumb muscles and some of the hand muscles that originate in the forearm, these are the muscles needed to achieve the support necessary for skilled hand use.

A hint for use with the smallest kids;  don’t match the shapes.  Match contrasting colors and shapes so that it is easier for children to figure out where to place their fingers to assemble and separate the pieces.

A hint for kids with a weak grasp of sensory discrimination issues:  Offer them the most textured shapes.  The irregular textures will help them maintain their grasp as they pull or push.

Looking for more ideas for hand skill development?  Check out The Hypermobile Hand: More Than A Strength Problem and For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

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This is my favorite set: Slice-a-Riffic!  The larger size and the textured pepper and corn are easy for even the weakest grip to manipulate.

For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up

 

photo-1453342664588-b702c83fc822For children with either low muscle tone or spasticity, toilet training can be a real challenge.  If it isn’t clothing management or making it to the potty on time, they can have a hard time perceiving that NOW is the time to start heading to the toilet.

Why?  Often, their interoception isn’t terrific.  What is interoception?  Think of it like proprioception, but internal.  It’s the ability to identify and interpret sensory information coming from organs and internal tissues.  Among them, the pressure of a full bladder or a full colon.  If you can’t feel and interpret sensation correctly, your only clue that you need the potty is when your pants are soiled.  Uh-oh.  A child with muscle tone issues is almost certainly going to have sensory issues.  Tone will affect the amount and quality of sensory feedback from their body.

What can you do to help kids?  The simplest, and the fastest solution I have found, is to tell them to stand up and see if they have changed their mind.  Why?  Because in a sitting position, the force of a full bladder or colon on the abdominal wall and the pelvic floor isn’t as intense.  Gravity and intra-abdominal pressure increase those sensations in standing.  More sensation can lead to more awareness.

So the next time your child tells you they don’t have to “go”, ask them to stand up and reconsider their opinion.  Now, if they are trying to watch a show or play a game, you aren’t going to get very far.  So make sure that they don’t have any competition for their attention!

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Well, I wrote the (e) book!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone gives you readiness checklists and ways to make readiness actually happen.  It has strategies you can use today to start making progress, regardless of your child’s level of communication and mobility.  Learn what occupational therapists know about how to teach this essential skill!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, on Amazon and on a terrific site for therapists and parents Your Therapy Source.  Read more about my unique book:The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Teach Your Child To Catch and Throw a Gertie Ball

 

71rwmnHGrHL._SL1500_These balls aren’t new, but they don’t get the recognition that they should.  The ability to catch a ball is a developmental milestone.  For kids with low muscle tone, sensory processing disorder (SPD) or ASD, it can be a difficult goal to achieve.  The Gertie ball is often the easiest for them to handle.  Here’s why:

  1. It is lightweight.  An inflatable ball is often easier to lift and catch.  The heavier plastic balls can be too heavy and create surprisingly substantial fatigue after a few tries.
  2. Gertie balls are textured.  Some have the original leathery touch, and some have raised bumps.  Nothing irritating, but all varieties provided helpful tactile input that supports grasp.  It is much easier to hold onto a ball that isn’t super-smooth.
  3. It can be under-inflated, making it slower to roll to and away from a young child.  Balls that roll away too fast are frustrating to children with slow motor or visual processing.  Balls that roll to quickly toward a child don’t give kids enough time to coordinate visual and motor responses.
  4. They have less impact when accidentally hitting a child or an object.  Kids get scared when a hard ball hits them.  And special needs kids often throw off the mark, making it more likely to hit something or someone else.  Keep things safer with a Gertie ball.

The biggest downside for Gertie balls is that they have a stem as a stopper, and curious older kids can remove it.  If you think that your child will be able to remove the stem, creating a choking hazard, only allow supervised playtime.

Looking for more information about sports and gross motor play?  Check out Picking The Best Trikes, Scooters, Etc. For Kids With Low Tone and Hypermobility and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?.  You could also take a look at What’s Really Missing When Kids Don’t Cross Midline?.

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Tub Safety For Special Needs Children

Bathtime is usually a fun experience for young children.  Toys, splashing, bubbles.  But it’s not always fun for parents.  If your child has issues with sensory sensitivity, sensory seeking or hypermobility, you can feel like a one-armed paperhanger; juggling toys, washcloth and child!

One solution is to use a bath seat.  A word of common sense first:  never leave a child unattended in any type of bath seat.  Just because these devices improve stability, they don’t remove all the risks of bathing in a tub.  Young children need to be supervised at all times.  But a tub seat does help a special needs child remain sitting and stable, and that can really help parents during bathing.  Here are the positive effects of using a bath seat or tub insert:

Kids with sensory seeking or sensory sensitivity can find the expanse of the standard tub overstimulating, and in response, they may become agitated or fearful.  The youngest kids can’t tell you how this feels.  They just act up.  Using a bath seat or a tub insert can allow these children to stay in the tub long enough to be washed, and help them stay calm and relaxed.  Since bath time is usually before bedtime, that is a big plus!

For kids with instability, the bath seat or insert can prevent them from injuring themselves if they tip or lean too much.  They could even build their ability to sit up if the seat is well-chosen for their needs.  These kids need to acquire a sense of independence, and if they are given the right support, they can start to sit without an adult holding them.  They may be able to use both hands more freely, developing coordination for learning to wash themselves and confidence in their independence.

Selecting the correct equipment can be easy or challenging.  After determining what level of assistance your child needs, figure out if your child fits well in the seat you are looking at.  Some seats are made for very small children.  If your child is older or larger, keep looking until you find equipment for them.  Therapy catalogs and sites have equipment for children with significant difficulties in holding their head up or maintaining a sitting position.  These are more expensive than mass-market items, but they are often adaptable and you can remove parts as your child builds their sitting skills and safety.

Looking for more information on making your home safer for your child?  Read Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child? and How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child.  I am a CAPS as well as an OTR.  This is a natural progression, as occupational therapists are always thinking of safety and independence for their clients, all the way from infancy to end-of-life issues.

For more information about self-care and the special needs child, check out Kids With Low Muscle Tone Can Sit For Dinner: A Multi-Course StrategyImproving Daily Life Skills for Kids With Special Needs, and OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues.

Are you toilet training your special needs child?  Do you worry that it may never happen?  I wrote the e-book for you!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is filled with readiness tips, techniques to find the best potty seat, and techniques to make learning faster and easier for both of you!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, and on Amazon and Your Therapy Source )a terrific site for parents and therapists).  Read more about this unique guide here: The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

 

Not Making It To the Potty In Time? Three Reasons Why Special Needs Kids Have Accidents

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If your special needs child isn’t experiencing a medical reason for incontinence (infection, blockage, neurological impairment) then you might be facing one of these three common roadblocks to total training success:

  1. Your child has limited or incomplete interoceptive awareness.  What is interoception?  It is the ability to sense and interpret internal cues.  The distention of the bladder, the fullness of the colon, etc are all internal cues that should send them to the potty.  Unfortunately, just as poor proprioception can hinder a child’s ability to move smoothly, poor interception can result in potty accidents, among other things.  Working with them to become more aware of those feelings can include monitoring their intake and elimination routines.  You will know when they should have more sensory input, and can educate them about what that means.  Listen to how they describe internal feelings.  Kids don’t always know the right words, so use their words or give them a new vocabulary to help them communicate.
  2. Your child’s clothing is difficult to manage, or their dressing skills aren’t up to the task.  They run out of time before nature calls.  Tops that are hard to roll up, pants that have tricky fasteners, even fabrics that are hard to grasp and manipulate.  All of these can make it a few seconds too long once they get into the bathroom.  If you are not in there with them, you may have to ask them to do a “dry run” so you can see what is going on and what you can change to make undressing faster.  In my e-book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I teach parents the best ways to teach dressing skills and the easiest clothing choices for training and beyond.  If you have ever had to “go” while in a formal gown or a holiday costume, you know how clothing choices can make it a huge challenge to using the toilet!
  3. Your child is too far from the bathroom when they get the “urge”.  Children  with mobility problems or planning problems may not think that they are in trouble right away.  They might be able to get to the bathroom in time in their own home.  When they are out in public or at school, the distance they have to cover can be significant, and barriers such as stairs or elevators can be an issue.  Even kids playing outside in their own yards might not be able to come inside in time.  If you can’t alter where they are, teach them to use the potty before they go outside or when they are near the bathroom, instead of waiting.  Taking the time to empty a half-full bladder is better than an accident.

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Read How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There” and Low Tone and Toilet Training: Learning to Hold It In Long Enough to Make It to The Potty.  and of course, my e-book is available for more extensive assistance The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Teaching Safety Awareness To Special Needs Toddlers

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Parents anxiously wait for their special needs infants to sit up, crawl and walk.  That last skill can take extra months or years.  Everyone, and I mean everyone, uses walking as a benchmark for maturity and independence.

They shouldn’t.  A child with poor safety awareness isn’t safer when they acquire mobility skills.  Sometimes they are much less safe.  Yes, they may be able to move without your help, but they may need to be more highly monitored and given more assistance to learn how to be safe.  They are exploring their environment and their new skills that took them a long time to develop.  They have been wanting to climb on the couch for months.  Now they can.  Getting down the “safe” way isn’t as important to them, and maybe not as easy as sliding or rolling off.  Oops.

What can parents do to help their child be a safer (notice I didn’t say “safe”) ambulator, crawler, cruiser, etc?  

  1. Talk about safety before they are independent.  Will they understand what it means?  Probably not, but your tone and your insistence on how movement is done says that you value safety and you want them to do the same.  Kids learn from all of our actions.  Make this one familiar to them by being very obvious and explicit.
  2. Take your physical therapist seriously when she or he teaches you how to work on core strength and balance skills.  Yes, I still maintain that safety is more than a sensory-motor skill, but having the best possible sensory and motor skills is important.  Having good safety awareness and safety behaviors without these skills will make a child more vulnerable to falls and injuries.
  3. The same goes for sensory processing activities.  If your child cannot perceive the movement of falling, the tactile and proprioceptive change as they crawl or step on something, or tolerate multiple sensory inputs at once, they are much less safe, even with good strength and coordination.  Really.
  4. Know your child’s cognitive and social/emotional skills.  Impulsive children are less safe overall.  Children that cannot process your instructions or recall them without you are less safe.  Children that enjoy defying you more than they want to avoid falling are less safe.  If you know any of these things, you can gauge safety and react more appropriately.  You will be less frustrated and more helpful to them.
  5. Reward safe execution and do not reward unsafe behavior.   My favorite way to avoid punishment but also to send my safety message home?  Not providing eye contact or much at all in the way of conversation as I stop unsafe actions, and either removing a child from an unsafe situation or assisting them in using the safe method to execute their move.  They get no satisfaction from seeing me react strongly, and they get the message that I am not accepting anything but their best safety skills as they move.
  6. Stop a child that is moving in an unsafe way, and see if they can recall and initiate the safe choice before assisting.  You don’t want to teach them that only you will make them safe and they need someone to be safe out there. They have to learn how to assess, react and respond, and all children can build their skills.  Some need more teaching, and some need more motivation to begin to take responsibility for their safety.  Give them both.

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Have a Child With Low Tone or a Hypermobile Baby? Pay More Attention to How You Pick Your Little One Up

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Carrying and holding kids is such a natural thing to do.  But when your child has hypermobility due to low muscle tone, joint issues or a connective tissue disorder, how you accomplish these simple tasks makes a difference.  Your actions can do more than get them from one position or location to another: they can build a child’s skills, or they can increase the risk of damage by creating excessive flexibility or even accidentally injure a child’s joints.

How could something so simple be both a problem as well as an opportunity?  Because hypermobility creates two issues that have to be addressed:  Less strength and stability at vulnerable joints, and less sensory feedback regarding pain and position sense in your child.  The ligaments, tendons, muscles and joint capsule at every hypermobile joint are more likely to be damaged when excessive force is placed on them.

Knowing how much force is too much isn’t easy without some instruction from a skilled therapist.  Depending on your child to react quickly and accurately to accidental stretch or pressure by crying or pulling away isn’t a good idea.  Their excessive flexibility reduces firing of receptors deep within all of these tissues in response to excessive force.  You may have looked at your child’s shoulders or ankles and think “That looks uncomfortable.  Why isn’t she fussing?”  This is the reason.  It means that you will have to be altering your actions to reduce the risk of harm.

As I mentioned earlier, this is also an opportunity.  It is an opportunity to teach your child about safe movement and positioning, right from the start.  Even the youngest child will pick up on your emphasis on alignment, control and safety.  They are always listening and learning from you every day, so incorporate effective movement into your handling and help your child build awareness and independence today!

Here are some strategies for you and your child:

  1. Always spread the force of your grasp over their body, and place your hands on the most stable locations, not the most flexible.  Lift a child through their trunk, not by holding their arms.  If they cannot steady their head, support it while you lift.  If you feel those little bones in their wrists and ankles moving under your grasp, support those joints instead of pulling on them.  Not sure how to do this correctly?  Ask your therapist for some instruction.
  2. Do not depend on a child’s comfort level to tell you how far a joint should stretch.   Think about typical joint movement instead.   If their hips spread very wide when you place them on your hip, think about holding them facing forward, with their knees in line with their hips, not pressed together.
  3. Give them time to move with you.  Those over-stretched muscles are at a mechanical disadvantage for contraction.  This means that when you tell a child to sit up, you have to give them time to do so before you scoop them up.  They aren’t  being defiant or lazy (I have not, in fact, ever met a lazy baby!).  This is a neuromuscular issue.
  4. Discourage unsafe movements.  Some children find that overstretching their joints gives them more sensory feedback.  It feels good to them.  This is not OK.  You will not be able to stop them every time, but they will eventually learn that their is a right way and a wrong way to move.  Knowing why isn’t necessary.  Yet.  Teach them to respect joint movement and use things like graded joint compression and vibration (your occupational therapist should be able to help you with this) to give them the sensory feedback they want.

Still concerned about safety?  Read Teaching Safety Awareness To Special Needs Toddlers  and  Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way to learn more methods to build independence without injury.

 

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Toilet Training For Preschool And Stuck in Neutral? Here’s Why…..

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Many of my clients are in a rush to get their kid trained in the next few weeks for school. They have been making some headway over the summer, but things can stall out half-way through.  Here are some common reasons (but probably not all of them) why kids hit a plateau:

  1. They lose that initial boost of excitement in achieving a “big kid” milestone.  Using the potty isn’t an accomplishment now, it is just a chore.
  2. Parents and caregivers aren’t able to keep up the emotional rewards they need.  It is hard to be as excited about the 10th poop in the potty as the first time.
  3. The rewards used aren’t rewarding anymore.  A sticker or a candy might not be enough to pull someone away from Paw Patrol.
  4. An episode of constipation or any other negative physical experience has them worried.  Even a little bit of difficulty can discourage a toddler.
  5. Too many accidents or not enough of a result when they are really trying can also discourage a child.
  6. Using the potty is now a power play.  Some kids need to feel in control, and foiling a parent’s goal of toileting gives them the feeling that they are the ones running the show.  “I won’t” feels so much better than “I did it” for these kids.
  7. Their clothes are a barrier.  When some families start training, it is in the buff or with just underwear.  Easy to make it to the potty in time.  With clothes on, especially with button-top pants or long shirts, it can be a race to get undressed before things “happen”.
  8. They haven’t been taught the whole process.  “Making” is so much more than eliminating.  Check out How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There” and The Ten Most Common Mistakes Parents Make During Toilet Training for some ideas on how to teach the whole enchilada.  And if you need a great book for kids without developmental or motor delays, look at my review A Great Toilet Training Book for Neurotypical Kids: Oh Crap Potty Training!.

Should you pause training? The answer is not always to take a break.  I know it sounds appealing to both adults and kids, but saying that this isn’t important any longer has a serious downside.  If your child has had some success, you can keep going but change some of your approaches so that they don’t get discouraged or disinterested.  If your child really wasn’t physically or cognitively ready, those are good reasons to regroup.  But most typically-developing kids over 2 are neurologically OK for training.  They may need to develop some other skills to deal with the bumps in the road that come along for just about every child.

Sometimes addressing each one of these issues will move training to the next level quickly!  Take a look at this list and see if you can pick out a few that look like the biggest barriers, and hack away at them today!

For kids with low muscle tone, including kids with ASD and SPD, take a look at my e-book, The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone.  Read Why Low Muscle Tone Creates More Toilet Training Struggles for Toddlers (and Parents!) to understand why I wrote this book just for you!   

I give parents clear readiness guidelines and tips on everything from the best equipment, the best way to handle fading rewards, to using the potty outside of your home.  It also includes an entire chapter on overcoming these bumps in the road! To learn more about what my e-book can do for you, read The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!