Category Archives: low tone

The Best Ride-On Toy For Younger (or Petite) Toddlers

 

61-g+QMVAYL._SL1000_.jpgAs an occupational therapist, I have always found it difficult to recommend a toddler ride-on toy for younger or smaller kids with low muscle tone and hypermobility.  Most of these toys have such a wide seat that children must propel themselves with their knees rotated out and pushing forward on their toes.  Exactly the pattern of movement we DON’T want to see.

And then I saw the Fly Bike.  This little fold-up bike has a seat that is about 9.5 inches high and has a very narrow seat.  This allows a child’s feet to be aligned with their hips, facilitating the development of hip and trunk control, not substituting bending forward and back to propel the toy.

The textured seat helps grip a child’s clothing for a little extra stability, and the small handlebars mean children aren’t draping their chest over the front of the toy; they are holding onto the handlebars with their hands.  Brilliant.  The rubber wheels are kind to indoor floors, but can handle pavement easily.

Are there children that don’t fit this toy?  Absolutely.  If your child is too tall for this toy, they shouldn’t use it.  If your child cannot maintain adequate sitting balance independently on this toy, they may need more support from another style of ride-on toy, perhaps with a larger seat and a backplate.

I finally have a great ride-on toy that I can recommend for smaller kids.  An early Xmas present to me and my little clients!

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A Great Toilet Training Book for Neurotypical Kids: Oh Crap Potty Training!

sean-wells-471209My readers know that I wrote an e-book on potty training kids with low tone ( The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived! ) but I have to admit, I learn a lot from other authors.  Jamie Glowacki  has written a terrific book that speaks clearly and directly to parents who aren’t sure they are up to the challenge of toilet training.  Oh Crap Potty Training is a funny title, but it is filled with useful ideas that help parents understand their toddler better and understand training needs so they can tackle this major life skill with humor and love.  I have to admit, I am really happy that she suggests parents of kids with developmental issues ask their OT for advice.  So few parents actually do!

Here are a few of her concepts that illustrate why I like her book so much:

  1. She gets the situation toddlers find themselves in:  using the potty is a total change in a comforting daily routine.  Jamie points out that since birth, your child has only known elimination into a diaper.  The older they are when you start training, the longer they have been using diapers.  WE are excited to move them on, but they can be afraid to sit, afraid to fail, and afraid of the certainty of the diaper always being there.  You can’t NOT get it in the diaper!  She also gets the power struggle that can be more enticing to an emerging personality after about 30 months of age.  Just saying, she gets it.
  2. Potty training success opens meaningful doors for kids, diapers keep them back.  Some great activities and some wonderful schools demand continence to attend.  By the time your child is around 3, they can feel inferior if they aren’t trained, but not be able to tell you.  They express it with anxiety or anger.  If you interpret it as not being ready, you aren’t helping them.
  3. Some kids will NEVER be ready on their own.  I know I am going to get some pushback on this one, and she already says she gets hate mail for saying it.  But there is a small subset of kids who will need your firm and loving direction to get started.   Waiting for readiness isn’t who they are.  If you are the parent of one of these kids, you know she’s right.  Your kid hasn’t been ready for any transition or change.  You have had to help them and then they were fine.  But this is who they are, and instead of waiting until the school makes you train her or your in-laws say something critical to your child, it might be OK to make things happen rather than waiting.
  4. You must believe that you are doing the right thing by training your child.  They can smell your uncertainty, and it will sink your ship.  She really sold me on her book with this one.  As a pediatric therapist, I know that my confidence is key when instructing parents in treatment techniques for a home program.  If I don’t know that I am recommending the right strategy, I know my doubt will show and nothing will go right.

If you are looking for some ideas on training kids of all stripes and needs, check out my posts  For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up and Toilet Training For Preschool And Stuck in Neutral? Here’s Why…...  Of course, if your child has low muscle tone or hypermobility, my e-book will help you understand why things seem so much harder, and what you can do to make potty training a success!

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Playing With Toy Food Builds Hand Skills…Faster!

81OGGQRPz8L._SL1500_This set is one of my favorite choices for toddlers of all ages and interests.  Why?  It is a safe, fun, clean-able toy that doesn’t require a USB connection or a battery.  That isn’t a complete oddity, but it getting more rare every year.  This toy is a great choice for kids with ASD, SPD, low muscle tone and hypermobility.  And children will play with it for years.  I like recommending toys that have the possibility of wearing out before they are thrown out.

In this age of edible pouches and pre-cut meal packages, your child might not realize that corn comes on a cob, or that there is a purple food; eggplant.  Learning about food through play is a wonderful way to introduce food preparation and an interest in healthy food choices.

Let’s unpack the benefits of this great set:

  • The theme is food; familiar and fun for most kids.  It encourages imaginative play and can be used by more than one child at a time.
  • The materials are lightweight and easy to clean.  The food toys made of wood sound so great, so holistic …until your toddler has chucked one into the flat screen TV in your family room!  Or at his sister’s head!  And for kids who lick or suck on toys, well, I don’t think most kids should be consuming paint.  I’d prefer it if kids didn’t lick toys, but lots of them do from time to time.  Plastic is a better choice for kids with a weak grasp as well.  Some children will revert to an immature or atypical grasp on a heavy object but can sustain a mature grasp on a lightweight item.
  • Different ages can enjoy this toy.  Very young toddlers simply connect and disconnect the velcro pieces.  Slightly older kids can practice color matching, and preschool kids can practice cutting with the super-safe knife in the set.  Even older kids can create elaborate pretend play.  I have had three and four year-olds preparing a pretend Shabbos meal, using a Kleenex to cover the bread.  Adorable!
  • The shapes are primarily cylinders and spheres.  Why is that good for motor development?  The arches in the hand are developed by hand use, and grasping these shapes encourages the use of the intrinsic muscles, deep in the palm of the hand.  Along with the thumb muscles and some of the hand muscles that originate in the forearm, these are the muscles needed to achieve the support necessary for skilled hand use.

A hint for use with the smallest kids;  don’t match the shapes.  Match contrasting colors and shapes so that it is easier for children to figure out where to place their fingers to assemble and separate the pieces.

A hint for kids with a weak grasp of sensory discrimination issues:  Offer them the most textured shapes.  The irregular textures will help them maintain their grasp as they pull or push.

Looking for more ideas for hand skill development?  Check out The Hypermobile Hand: More Than A Strength Problem and For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

For Kids Who Don’t Know They Need to “Go”? Tell Them to Stand Up

 

photo-1453342664588-b702c83fc822For children with either low muscle tone or spasticity, toilet training can be a real challenge.  If it isn’t clothing management or making it to the potty on time, they can have a hard time perceiving that NOW is the time to start heading to the toilet.

Why?  Often, their interoception isn’t terrific.  What is interoception?  Think of it like proprioception, but internal.  It’s the ability to identify and interpret sensory information coming from organs and internal tissues.  Among them, the pressure of a full bladder or a full colon.  If you can’t feel and interpret sensation correctly, your only clue that you need the potty is when your pants are soiled.  Uh-oh.  A child with muscle tone issues is almost certainly going to have sensory issues.  Tone will affect the amount and quality of sensory feedback from their body.

What can you do to help kids?  The simplest, and the fastest solution I have found, is to tell them to stand up and see if they have changed their mind.  Why?  Because in a sitting position, the force of a full bladder or colon on the abdominal wall and the pelvic floor isn’t as intense.  Gravity and intra-abdominal pressure increase those sensations in standing.  More sensation can lead to more awareness.

So the next time your child tells you they don’t have to “go”, ask them to stand up and reconsider their opinion.  Now, if they are trying to watch a show or play a game, you aren’t going to get very far.  So make sure that they don’t have any competition for their attention!

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Well, I wrote the (e) book!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone gives you readiness checklists and ways to make readiness actually happen.  It has strategies you can use today to start making progress, regardless of your child’s level of communication and mobility.  Learn what occupational therapists know about how to teach this essential skill!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, on Amazon and on a terrific site for therapists and parents Your Therapy Source.  Read more about my unique book:The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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Teach Your Child To Catch and Throw a Gertie Ball

 

71rwmnHGrHL._SL1500_These balls aren’t new, but they don’t get the recognition that they should.  The ability to catch a ball is a developmental milestone.  For kids with low muscle tone, sensory processing disorder (SPD) or ASD, it can be a difficult goal to achieve.  The Gertie ball is often the easiest for them to handle.  Here’s why:

  1. It is lightweight.  An inflatable ball is often easier to lift and catch.  The heavier plastic balls can be too heavy and create surprisingly substantial fatigue after a few tries.
  2. Gertie balls are textured.  Some have the original leathery touch, and some have raised bumps.  Nothing irritating, but all varieties provided helpful tactile input that supports grasp.  It is much easier to hold onto a ball that isn’t super-smooth.
  3. It can be under-inflated, making it slower to roll to and away from a young child.  Balls that roll away too fast are frustrating to children with slow motor or visual processing.  Balls that roll to quickly toward a child don’t give kids enough time to coordinate visual and motor responses.
  4. They have less impact when accidentally hitting a child or an object.  Kids get scared when a hard ball hits them.  And special needs kids often throw off the mark, making it more likely to hit something or someone else.  Keep things safer with a Gertie ball.

The biggest downside for Gertie balls is that they have a stem as a stopper, and curious older kids can remove it.  If you think that your child will be able to remove the stem, creating a choking hazard, only allow supervised playtime.

Looking for more information about sports and gross motor play?  Check out Picking The Best Trikes, Scooters, Etc. For Kids With Low Tone and Hypermobility and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?.  You could also take a look at What’s Really Missing When Kids Don’t Cross Midline?.

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Tub Safety For Special Needs Children

Bathtime is usually a fun experience for young children.  Toys, splashing, bubbles.  But it’s not always fun for parents.  If your child has issues with sensory sensitivity, sensory seeking or hypermobility, you can feel like a one-armed paperhanger; juggling toys, washcloth and child!

One solution is to use a bath seat.  A word of common sense first:  never leave a child unattended in any type of bath seat.  Just because these devices improve stability, they don’t remove all the risks of bathing in a tub.  Young children need to be supervised at all times.  But a tub seat does help a special needs child remain sitting and stable, and that can really help parents during bathing.  Here are the positive effects of using a bath seat or tub insert:

Kids with sensory seeking or sensory sensitivity can find the expanse of the standard tub overstimulating, and in response, they may become agitated or fearful.  The youngest kids can’t tell you how this feels.  They just act up.  Using a bath seat or a tub insert can allow these children to stay in the tub long enough to be washed, and help them stay calm and relaxed.  Since bath time is usually before bedtime, that is a big plus!

For kids with instability, the bath seat or insert can prevent them from injuring themselves if they tip or lean too much.  They could even build their ability to sit up if the seat is well-chosen for their needs.  These kids need to acquire a sense of independence, and if they are given the right support, they can start to sit without an adult holding them.  They may be able to use both hands more freely, developing coordination for learning to wash themselves and confidence in their independence.

Selecting the correct equipment can be easy or challenging.  After determining what level of assistance your child needs, figure out if your child fits well in the seat you are looking at.  Some seats are made for very small children.  If your child is older or larger, keep looking until you find equipment for them.  Therapy catalogs and sites have equipment for children with significant difficulties in holding their head up or maintaining a sitting position.  These are more expensive than mass-market items, but they are often adaptable and you can remove parts as your child builds their sitting skills and safety.

For more information about self-care and the special needs child, check out Kids With Low Muscle Tone Can Sit For Dinner: A Multi-Course StrategyImproving Daily Life Skills for Kids With Special Needs, and OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues.

Are you toilet training your special needs child?  Do you worry that it may never happen?  I wrote the e-book for you!  The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone is filled with readiness tips, techniques to find the best potty seat, and techniques to make learning faster and easier for both of you!  It is available on my website tranquil babies, and on Amazon and Your Therapy Source )a terrific site for parents and therapists).  Read more about this unique guide here: The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

 

Not Making It To the Potty In Time? Three Reasons Why Special Needs Kids Have Accidents

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If your special needs child isn’t experiencing a medical reason for incontinence (infection, blockage, neurological impairment) then you might be facing one of these three common roadblocks to total training success:

  1. Your child has limited or incomplete interoceptive awareness.  What is interoception?  It is the ability to sense and interpret internal cues.  The distention of the bladder, the fullness of the colon, etc are all internal cues that should send them to the potty.  Unfortunately, just as poor proprioception can hinder a child’s ability to move smoothly, poor interception can result in potty accidents, among other things.  Working with them to become more aware of those feelings can include monitoring their intake and elimination routines.  You will know when they should have more sensory input, and can educate them about what that means.  Listen to how they describe internal feelings.  Kids don’t always know the right words, so use their words or give them a new vocabulary to help them communicate.
  2. Your child’s clothing is difficult to manage, or their dressing skills aren’t up to the task.  They run out of time before nature calls.  Tops that are hard to roll up, pants that have tricky fasteners, even fabrics that are hard to grasp and manipulate.  All of these can make it a few seconds too long once they get into the bathroom.  If you are not in there with them, you may have to ask them to do a “dry run” so you can see what is going on and what you can change to make undressing faster.  In my e-book, The Practical Guide To Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone, I teach parents the best ways to teach dressing skills and the easiest clothing choices for training and beyond.  If you have ever had to “go” while in a formal gown or a holiday costume, you know how clothing choices can make it a huge challenge to using the toilet!
  3. Your child is too far from the bathroom when they get the “urge”.  Children  with mobility problems or planning problems may not think that they are in trouble right away.  They might be able to get to the bathroom in time in their own home.  When they are out in public or at school, the distance they have to cover can be significant, and barriers such as stairs or elevators can be an issue.  Even kids playing outside in their own yards might not be able to come inside in time.  If you can’t alter where they are, teach them to use the potty before they go outside or when they are near the bathroom, instead of waiting.  Taking the time to empty a half-full bladder is better than an accident.

Looking for more information on toilet training?  Read How To Teach Your Child To Wipe “Back There” and Low Tone and Toilet Training: Learning to Hold It In Long Enough to Make It to The Potty.  and of course, my e-book is available for more extensive assistance The Practical Guide to Toilet Training Your Child With Low Muscle Tone: Potty Training Help Has Arrived!

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