Category Archives: hand coordination

The Not-So-Secret Solution for Your Child With Motor And Sensory Issues: Dycem

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In adult rehab, occupational therapists are regularly providing patients who have incoordination, muscle weakness or joint instability with both skill-building activities and adaptive equipment such as Dycem.  In pediatrics, you see a predominance of skills training.  Adaptive equipment shows up primarily for the most globally and pervasively disabled children.  I think that should change. Why?  Because frustration is an impediment to learning, and adaptive equipment can be like training wheels; you can take them off as skills develop.  When kids aren’t constantly frustrated, they are excited to try harder and feel supported by adults, not aggravated.

 

What Dycem Can Do For Your Child

Dycem isn’t a new product, but you hardly ever see it suggested to kids with mild to moderate motor incoordination, low tone, sensory processing disorders, hypermobility, and dyspraxia.  We let these kids struggle as their cereal bowl spills and their crayons roll away from them.  Dycem matting is a great tool for these kids.  It is grippy on both sides, but it is easy to clean.  Place a terrific bowl or plate on it OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues, and it won’t tip over with gentle pressure, and not even if the surface has a slight incline.  It lasts a long time, and can be cut into any shape needed for a booster seat tray or under the base of a toy like a dollhouse or a toy garage.  Placing a piece of Dycem under your child while they are sitting on a tripp trap chair or a cube chair A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Stokke Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato ChairThe Cube Chair: Your Special Needs Toddler’s New Favorite Seat! will help them keep their pelvis stable while they eat and play.  The bright color contrasts with most objects, supporting kids with visual deficits and poor visual perceptual skills.  It catches their eye and their attention.  As you can see, Dycem has a lot to offer children and parents.

How To Use Dycem To Build Motor Skills

Will it prevent all spills or falls?  No.  But it will decrease the constant failures that cause children to give up and request your help, or cause them to refuse to continue trying.  Children are creating their self-image earlier than you realize, so helping them see themselves as competent is essential.  Will it teach kids not to use their non-dominant hand to stabilize objects?  Not if an adult uses it correctly.  Introducing Dycem at the appropriate stage in motor development and varying when and where it is used is the key.  Children need lots of different types of situations in order to develop bilateral control, and as long as they are given a wide variety of opportunities, offering them adaptive equipment during key activities isn’t going to slow them down.  It will show them that we are supporting them on their journey.  When kids are new to an activity or a skill and need repeated successes to keep trying, Dycem can help them persevere.  When children are moving to the next level of skill and see that they are struggling more, Dycem can support them until they master this new level.

The Cheap Hack:  Silicone Mats

I will often recommend the use of silicone baking mats instead of dycem.  These inexpensive mats often do the job at a lower cost, and can be easily replaced if lost at daycare or school.  Dycem is a specialty item that can be purchased online but not in most stores.  Silicone mats aren’t as grippy, but they are easily washed and dried.  Some families are averse to anything that looks like adaptive equipment, so I may introduce these mats first to build a parent’s confidence in my recommendations.

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Teens With Chronic Illness Or Disability Need A Good Guide: Read “Easy For You To Say”

bagas-vg-426755Being a tween or teen isn’t easy, but having a chronic physical illness or disability (not interchangeable) can make it extremely difficult.  Kids aren’t always great at asking for help or even answering questions, so this wonderfully useful book has done the groundwork for you.

Dr. Miriam Kaufman’s book Easy For You To Say is an easy-to read format of questions and answers that is accessible for teens to read and parents of teens will learn a tremendous amount as well.  She has a significant amount of experience with this subject, and has plenty of solid medical knowledge to back up her information.

As a physician, you will find that she includes a great deal of medical information, including medication lists related to teen concerns such as acne and sexual response and functioning.  These lists, of course, are dated the minute the book is published, but the general categories of drugs that have effects that concern teens is helpful as a starting point for discussions with a pediatrician or specialist.

This book isn’t just about the medical concerns that occur with physical illness and disability.  Dr. Kaufman covers the challenges of relationships of all kinds, and practical issues with school, work, and having fun as a teenager while dealing with significant issues.  This book doesn’t mince words but is unfailingly positive.  Kids (and parents of teens) really need that positivity while trying to launch into a life of more independence.  She is a strong proponent of self-advocacy that doesn’t become militant but is always life-affirming.  There is some discussion of higher education and career planning, which is so essential Career Planning for Teens with JRA, EDS, and Other Chronic Health Issues.

This book has it’s limitations.  It doesn’t address cognitive disabilities or psychiatric disabilities like living with bipolar illnesses, nor does it speak about ASD or SPD.  These issues can co-occur in the same teen, and it is then that you might want to think about what an OT has to offer.  This author doesn’t even mention us as helpful professionals that do more than, if you can believe it, help kids look at career options.  Perhaps she missed the class on what “occupation” really references.  Oh well.

As an occupational therapist, I wish my profession had been mentioned as a greater resource for disabled teens, but perhaps I should not be that surprised that it is left out.  Most physicians aren’t aware of how OTs can meaningfully assist kids past the Early Intervention years to enhance their functioning and learn both better skills and work-arounds to accomplish what they would like to do in life.  For example, her book speaks in great detail about the complications of mobility and coordination limitations during sexual activity.  Since just about every teen is curious about this subject, an occupational therapist could help them adapt their environment, equipment and movements to make this part of ADLs a success on many fronts.  Dr. Kaufman has a lot of ideas, but the specifics for each teen are going to be different, and that is where OTs shine.

This book should be on the shelf of most pediatric physiatrists, and most OTs.  It is now on mine!  If your child is no longer a child, I recommend “Life Disrupted” by Laurie Edwards.  This book covers the situations that young adults in their 20’s really need to figure out.  Specifically, learning how to craft a career, develop relationships and become independent when you are dealing with a chronic illness.  None of it is easy, but the author is both supportive and realistic.  I think that helps more than platitudes and positivity without, as Dr. Phil might say, putting verbs in the sentences.

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Deluxe Water Wow Pads Offer More Challenge And More Fun To Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

 

91Wl4b-x3nL._SX425_.jpgMy clients and colleagues know how much I love the original Water Wow books.  They are reusable and mess-free fun for kids at home, at the doctor’s office, the restaurant and the plane ride.  These bigger books are going to be even more fun for preschool kids and kindergarteners!

Here are some great reasons why I love these books:

  • They have more pages, and more pages means they keep kids busy (and happy) longer.
  • They offer more detail and more challenge.  The graphics inspire critical thought (Is this a silly thing to find in the supermarket or not?) and the red lens that looks like a magnifying glass makes kids feel like Sherlock Holmes as they search for secret items.
  • There are mazes, hidden items and pages where kids can compare two almost-identical pictures and find the anomalies.  It is more than just wiping water on a picture.
  • Like the originals, the pages dry quickly and can be used over and over.  It seems like kids would get bored after the first run-through, but children can enjoy the “reveal” and the sensory play of water on a page for a long time after they have solved all the puzzles.  If you are at 30K feet and your kid is getting restless, this could buy you a bit of time without having to resort to screens that they will insist on for the rest of the (expensive) trip.  Genius.
  • Oh, and the pen is easy to grasp, and it develops a mature pencil grasp with repeated use.  Yeah!

I think these would be terrific holiday gifts.  If you are looking for more gift ideas, read Automoblox: For the Discriminating Preschool Gearhead and Melissa And Doug Tape Activity Book Is Reusable Fun for some other good toys that build skills while having fun!

Playing With Toy Food That Connects With Velcro Builds Children’s Hand Skills Faster!

81OGGQRPz8L._SL1500_This set is one of my favorite choices for toddlers of all ages and interests.  Why?  It is a safe, fun, clean-able toy that doesn’t require a USB connection or a battery.  That isn’t a complete oddity, but it getting more rare every year.  This toy is a great choice for kids with ASD, SPD, low muscle tone and hypermobility.  And children will play with it for years.  I like recommending toys that have the possibility of wearing out before they are thrown out.

In this age of edible pouches and pre-cut meal packages, your child might not realize that corn comes on a cob, or that there is a purple food; eggplant.  Learning about food through play is a wonderful way to introduce food preparation and an interest in healthy food choices.

Let’s unpack the benefits of this great set:

  • The theme is food; familiar and fun for most kids.  It encourages imaginative play and can be used by more than one child at a time.
  • The materials are lightweight and easy to clean.  The food toys made of wood sound so great, so holistic …until your toddler has chucked one into the flat screen TV in your family room!  Or at his sister’s head!  And for kids who lick or suck on toys, well, I don’t think most kids should be consuming paint.  I’d prefer it if kids didn’t lick toys, but lots of them do from time to time.  Plastic is a better choice for kids with a weak grasp as well.  Some children will revert to an immature or atypical grasp on a heavy object but can sustain a mature grasp on a lightweight item.
  • Different ages can enjoy this toy.  Very young toddlers simply connect and disconnect the velcro pieces.  Slightly older kids can practice color matching, and preschool kids can practice cutting with the super-safe knife in the set.  Even older kids can create elaborate pretend play.  I have had three and four year-olds preparing a pretend Shabbos meal, using a Kleenex to cover the bread.  Adorable!
  • The shapes are primarily cylinders and spheres.  Why is that good for motor development?  The arches in the hand are developed by hand use, and grasping these shapes encourages the use of the intrinsic muscles, deep in the palm of the hand.  Along with the thumb muscles and some of the hand muscles that originate in the forearm, these are the muscles needed to achieve the support necessary for skilled hand use.

A hint for use with the smallest kids;  don’t match the shapes.  Match contrasting colors and shapes so that it is easier for children to figure out where to place their fingers to assemble and separate the pieces.

A hint for kids with a weak grasp of sensory discrimination issues:  Offer them the most textured shapes.  The irregular textures will help them maintain their grasp as they pull or push.

Looking for more ideas for hand skill development?  Check out The Hypermobile Hand: More Than A Strength Problem and For Kids With Sensory Issues and Low Tone, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance.

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This is my favorite set: Slice-a-Riffic!  The larger size and the textured pepper and corn are easy for even the weakest grip to manipulate.

Teach Your Child To Catch and Throw a Gertie Ball

 

71rwmnHGrHL._SL1500_These balls aren’t new, but they don’t get the recognition that they should.  The ability to catch a ball is a developmental milestone.  For kids with low muscle tone, sensory processing disorder (SPD) or ASD, it can be a difficult goal to achieve.  The Gertie ball is often the easiest for them to handle.  Here’s why:

  1. It is lightweight.  An inflatable ball is often easier to lift and catch.  The heavier plastic balls can be too heavy and create surprisingly substantial fatigue after a few tries.
  2. Gertie balls are textured.  Some have the original leathery touch, and some have raised bumps.  Nothing irritating, but all varieties provided helpful tactile input that supports grasp.  It is much easier to hold onto a ball that isn’t super-smooth.
  3. It can be under-inflated, making it slower to roll to and away from a young child.  Balls that roll away too fast are frustrating to children with slow motor or visual processing.  Balls that roll to quickly toward a child don’t give kids enough time to coordinate visual and motor responses.
  4. They have less impact when accidentally hitting a child or an object.  Kids get scared when a hard ball hits them.  And special needs kids often throw off the mark, making it more likely to hit something or someone else.  Keep things safer with a Gertie ball.

The biggest downside for Gertie balls is that they have a stem as a stopper, and curious older kids can remove it.  If you think that your child will be able to remove the stem, creating a choking hazard, only allow supervised playtime.

Looking for more information about sports and gross motor play?  Check out Picking The Best Trikes, Scooters, Etc. For Kids With Low Tone and Hypermobility and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?.  You could also take a look at What’s Really Missing When Kids Don’t Cross Midline?.

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DUPLO’s My First Number Train Set Is An Easy Way to Build Grasp in Toddlers!

 

 

91YccX0yt9L._SL1500_.jpgI really like this set from LEGO.  The DUPLO line is intended for children 18 months to 5 years old, but I think older kids will enjoy it as well when they combine pieces to make more complex designs.

The #1 reason I like this set is that the great majority of the pieces are easy to hold, easy to assemble, and hard to swallow.  I encourage families to remove the smaller pieces until their child is not prone to putting small things in their mouth.  But that still leaves so many pieces left for fun!

Young children struggle with asymmetrically-shaped pieces, so simple squares and rectangles are easier to manage.  The larger squares with numbers on them are especially easy to hold; they fit securely into the palm of a toddler and provide surface area for them to place their fingers securely on the sides of the blocks as they put two together.

In addition, the colors and the numbers are great for early learning.  Some of the families I work with get two sets and work on matching numbers and colors while they are working on grasp and coordination.

Oh, and the set is under $20 U.S.  Nothing like a value to make me smile!!!

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Boost Pincer Grasp With Tiny Containers

These days I am getting pretty…lazy.  My go-to items are designed so that children automatically  improve their grasp or their posture without my intervention.  I am  always searching for easy carryover strategies to share with parents too.  As with most things in life, easy is almost always better than complicated.

My recent fave piece of equipment to develop pincer grasp in toddlers and preschoolers is something you can pick up in your grocery store, but you are gonna use it quite differently from the manufacturer’s marketing plan….

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Remember these?

Enter the tiny party cup, AKA the disposable shot glass!  Yes, the one you used when you played “quarters” in school.  The very same.  These little cups work really well to teach toddlers to drink from an open cup, but they are also terrific containers to promote pincer grasp in young children.  Drop a few small snacks into these little cups and discourage them from dumping their snack onto the table instead of reaching inside with their fingers.

No matter how small your child’s fingers are, they will automatically attempt a tripod or pincer grasp to retrieve their treat.  You should’t have to say much of anything, but it never hurts to demonstrate how easy it is.  Make sure you eat your snack once you take it out of your cup.  After all, grownups deserve snacks too!

These little containers are much sturdier than paper cups.  This means that they can survive the grasp of a toddler who cannot grade their force well.  The cylindrical shape, with a slightly smaller base than top, naturally demands a refined grasp.  The cups have a bit of texture around the middle of the cup (at least mine do)  which gives some helpful tactile input to assist the non-dominant hand to maintain control during use.  They are top-shelf dishwasher safe and hand-washable, in case you feel strongly that disposables aren’t part of your scene.

Has your child mastered pincer grasp?  These little cups are fun to use in water and sand tables as well.  Mastery of pouring and scooping develops strong wrist and forearm control for utensil use and pre-writing with crayons.

For more ideas on developing grasp, take a look at Want Pincer Grasp Before Her First Birthday? Bet You’ll Be Surprised At What Moves (Hint) Build Hand Control! and Develop Pincer Grasp With Ziploc Bags.