Category Archives: accessibility

Safety Awareness With Your Hypermobile Child? Its Not a Big Thing, Its the Biggest Thing

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Therapists always try hard to be optimistic when discussing their pediatric client’s future.  Why not?  Kids have amazing potential, and we aren’t fortune tellers; there are so many things that can go right.

As therapists, we also should share the reality of how bad choices create unfortunate consequences.  Among them are the long-term results of falls, especially head injuries.  Kids fall, kids trip, kids walk into things.  All kids, and for much of early childhood.  The hypermobile child will have more episodes of injury, often has greater injury occurring in each episode, and frequently experiences a slower or less complete recovery from injury.  This isn’t a criticism of parents, kids, or even acute medical care.  It is the reality of living with a condition, often a syndrome, that has effects beyond just loose joints.

This can include connective tissue disorders that create weak skin, ligaments, and tendons, decreased pain registration, delayed protective reactions when falling, and cognitive or behavioral complications that make learning and controlling actions more difficult.  Hypermobile kids often spend more years in an unstable state in which they need assistance and supervision.  And more years when they are vulnerable to serious injury.  A head injury or a spine injury isn’t an “unfortunate” event.  It is frequently a life-changing event.  The course of education and employment can be forever altered.  For the worse.

In a clinic or school setting, your therapist is bound to guidelines that indemnify them and the facility. While they cannot control what happens at home, you should know what to do to make your home safer for a child with hypermobility.  It begins with your environment, then you change your responses, then your build  your child’s ability to incorporate safety awareness into their day.

  • Create a safe but accessible home.  This expands on “baby proofing” to include railings set at a height that allow your child to push up rather than hang on them.  Removal of loose rugs and adding padded floor surfaces in common areas, especially areas where they are climbing or running.  Bathrooms are the location for many injuries once children become independent in toileting or bathing.  Instead of supervising them forever, create a safe place with hidden grab bars (there are toilet paper holders and towel racks that are actually grab bars) and non-slip flooring.  Place needed items within easy reach without climbing.
  • Teach safe movement from the start.  Children that learn how to move versus children that are passively moved will have more safety awareness.  For children that still need a lot of help, narrate your moves and weave in safety messages.  It will sink in.  Finally, don’t allow unsafe moves, even if they didn’t hurt themselves.  Tell them to try it again the safe way.  Children are unable to anticipate the results of their actions.  This is why we don’t let 12 year-olds drive or let 5 year-olds cross the street alone.  Sometimes the reason they do things our way is because we said so.  Until they are old enough to understand the “why”.
  • Share your thought processes with children as soon as they can wrap their heads around things.  Even kids in preschool can follow along with the idea that too many “boo-boos” will stop them from being able to play.  Older kids can learn that the right chair helps them stave off fatigue until they finish a game.
  • Ask your therapists for specific safety advice, and then carefully think through their answers.  The truth is that some therapists are more safety-aware than others.  I have been told that I am one of the most vocal therapists on a team when regarding safety issues.  Perhaps it is because I spent 10 years working in adult rehab, treating patients for problems that started decades before I met them.  I have seen what overuse and poor design has cost people.  By then it is often too late to do much more than compensation and adaptation.  I am committed to prevention with my pediatric clients.  The cost is too high not to say something and say it loud.

For more information and ideas about helping your child with hypermobility, read Is Your Hypermobile Child Frequently In An Awkward Position? No, She Really DOESN’T Feel Any Pain From Sitting That Way and Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?

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Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child?

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Affordable accessibility and no institutional appearance!

I know that some of you don’t even realize that such a thing exists:  a toilet sized for preschoolers and kindergarteners!  Well, you won’t find it in Lowe’s or Home Depot on the showroom floor, but you can buy them online, and it is an option to consider.  Here are the reasons you might put one in your child’s main bathroom:

  1. You have the space already.  Some homes are large enough to allow each bedroom to have its own bathroom.   If you have the option, it might be worth it during renovations.  It shouldn’t add considerably to the overall cost, and it should not be that difficult to swap out when your child grows.  If you have a bathroom near the playroom, that might be another good location for this potty.  Most older kids and adults can make it to another half-bath on that floor, but it might be perfect for your younger child and his friends!
  2. Your child is terrified of the standard-height potty.  Some kids are unstable, some are afraid of heights, and some have such poor proprioception and/or visual skills that they really, really need their feet on the ground, not on a footstool.
  3. Your child was a preemie, and their growth pattern indicates that they will fit on this toilet comfortably for a while.  Some preemies catch up, and some stay on the petite size.  Those children will be able to use a preschool-right potty into early elementary school.  Even if your preemie is average in size, they may have issues such as vision or sensory sensitivity that will make this potty a great idea for a shorter time.

I am just beginning to build my materials to do in-home consultations as a CAPS, but I think that an underserved population are parents of special needs kids that would benefit from universal design and adaptive design.  This toilet would come under the category of adaptive design, and it is an easily affordable solution for some children.  Having more comfort on the toilet speeds up training for many kids.  It also decreases the aggravation of training and monitoring safety for parents.  I am very committed to helping the entire family have an easier time of things like toilet training.

Think about what your family’s needs and capabilities are, and if you are planning to remodel or build a new home, consider finding a CAPS professional in your area to help you make your home as welcoming for your special needs child as possible!  For more information, read How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child.

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How An Aging-In-Place Specialist Can Help You Design an Accessible Home for Your Child

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I finally did it; I got my CAPS certification!  I know, you are asking yourself “What does a pediatric occupational therapist want with an Aging-In-Place certificate?”  Well, as it turns out, many of the barriers and home access problems that require redesign or better design for older adults are also issues with children dealing with developmental issues.  And they deserve the most functional home they can possibly have!

I treat children in their homes, so I see a wide variety of situations.  Here are a few of the most common problems I encounter:

  1. Entries and stairs that don’t have railings at a helpful height for children with motor control issues.  If your child is likely to struggle with stairs for a while, adding a lower railing on both sides of the stairs is very, very helpful.  They can be removed later on, but since you cannot alter the risers (the height of the steps) without major construction, do what you can to give your child a secure handhold.
  2. Slippery floors.  Tile can be treated to make it just a bit tackier, but not feel like gravel.  Online sellers will offer this, and you can apply it yourself if you are skilled, or hire a tile company to coat your tile for you.
  3. Right-height work areas.  Young children with motor issues often need the play table to be the correct height for them.  Their reach and grasp, as well as their balance, improves when they are sitting well.  But they grow.  What can you do?  I suggest buying an inexpensive wooden table and cutting the legs until they are the right height.  When your child outgrows it, buy a new table and trim the legs as needed.   You can add brackets on the leg joints to add stability to an inexpensive table.

If you are in the market for a new home, a CAPS professional can help you think about accessibility as a factor when shopping for real estate.  Although the easiest way to achieve universal access is to build a new home, there are homes that are easier to adapt, and home that are nearly impossible.  Being able to see what a house offers is more than location, location, location.

Know what the implications of your child’s diagnosis means for accessibility and function.  Children with cystic fibrosis, cerebral palsy, or muscular dystrophy will likely do better in a ranch house or a house with an elevator.  Don’t think you have the room for an elevator?  You might, you might not, or you might install a lift instead.  Your CAPS consultant can help you look at all the options.  Improving bathing, grooming and safe play spaces is on the list of things that a CAPS professional can address.  Read Should You Install a Child-Sized Potty for Your Special Needs Child? to find out how this simple and affordable swap could make life easier for both of you.

I will be exploring all of my options for consulting as a CAPS, but my training as an OTR and my background in adult and pediatric home care means that I will be as excited to help young families as to help older people.  Who knows: I may decide to offer a multi-generational package of services!  Stay tuned for more information and suggestions for accessibility!

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