Monthly Archives: November 2020

Doing Therapeutic Listening? Get These Affordable, Comfortable, Kid-Size Bluetooth Headphones From PURO!

Wirecutter, owned by the New York Times, just did a piece on great gifts. The PURO BT2200 models were featured because they are child-sized NOISE-LIMITING headphones with a BUILT-IN MIC, which is great for virtual school participation.

I am recommending them because they will not destroy your child’s hearing. They max out at 85 decibels. No matter what your kid does with the volume bar on your iPhone, these headphones will save their hearing. You can stream from your iPhone wirelessly from 30 feet. That means it will work with Quickshifts and Modulated auditory/sensory processing treatment programs.

Readers know how effective I believe therapeutic listening can be for kids Quickshifts: A Simple, Successful, and Easy to Use Treatment For Regulation, Attention, and Postural Activation , but using speakers isn’t ideal. Finding headphones that your kid will keep on their head isn’t easy, and nobody wants a fight during a pandemic (or any other time, to be honest).

The new over-ear ear cups are big and soft, making longer listening times easier. They only fit the NEW headphones though, so if you want them, you will have to buy the current model of the BT2200. The new BT2200’s are $85, so you can give the old model to your other kid(s) and use the new one for your kid doing therapeutic listening. The large ear cups are $15. This is a really affordable buy-in for high-quality headphones for sensory treatment at home in the middle of a pandemic. For kids who cannot get in-person treatment, this is one way to make a big difference in their sensory processing without direct contact.

They come with an extended warranty, and since kids throw things, I do recommend buying it. The one-year warranty is good, but the extra coverage means you can breathe a little.

Book Review By An OTR: Life, Disrupted; Getting Real About Chronic Illness in Your Twenties and Thirties

Although I work in pediatrics now, I spent the first 10 years of my career in adult ortho-neuro rehab. This means that I worked with many young adults facing issues from RA, MS, Lupus, spinal cord injuries, and more. They were just getting started with jobs, raising children, and making an adult life, but they had to deal with chronic disorders that impacted every part of daily living. And their needs were different in some ways from the older patients, who developed issues in their 60’s and 70’s or beyond. THEIR children were grown, their careers were often over, they had saved for retirement, etc.

Why am I writing a review on a book about ADULTS? First, many of the kids I treat will grow up to be adults with chronic issues. Their parents may or may not acknowledge this at 3 a.m., when they think about their child’s future with some fear in their hearts. Second, the PARENTS of some of my clients have their own issues. Sometimes the same ones, but sometimes lightning does strike twice, and the child has a different issue or issues from the parent’s own concerns. Either way, people want ideas and the feeling that they aren’t the only ones dealing with these issues.

This book is written by Laurie Edwards, who faces a chronic respiratory illness with a combination of determination and honesty that other adults with chronic illness will find refreshing. She isn’t shy about describing how it has affected her relationships or her ability to look at her future. But the book includes many other stories. Within the book you will meet a college student with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a young mother with another respiratory illness, and others with common and uncommon diagnoses.

Chronic disorders or illnesses can make immediate decisions harder, but they make plans for the future harder as well. I have felt strongly that teens with chronic illnesses need to plan their careers based on more than their talents. The realities of living in the US mean that having health insurance isn’t a given. Having the ability to take paid leave isn’t either. The “gig economy” isn’t kind to people with chronic disorders, and until our country decides to change this, it is important to choose education and training that will allow a person with a chronic illness to obtain good care. It really can be a “life or death” decision.

Ms. Edwards also takes on the decision to bear and/or raise children. Although there aren’t any specific strategies offered, she walks the reader through her process, and the decision-making of other people with chronic illnesses and conditions. One of the great gaps in care, IMHO, is care for mothers with chronic disorders. Raising children is hard work. Hard physical work, hard mental work, hard emotional work. Lots of joy, but lots, and lots, of work. Protecting their health when faced with their child’s needs often means that women sacrifice themselves and do not realize that there are options that reduce risk while being the great moms they want to be.

The lack of useful information from the therapy community is just astounding. We know a great deal that could make life easier, but there isn’t anything available to parents unless they are lucky enough to have generous health care coverage that provides them with therapy sessions. I have found YouTube videos on lifting and carrying kids when you have physical disabilities…none by therapists. We know so much about this topic, but parents seem to have to figure even this simple thing out for themselves. When understanding the principles and their own abilities could make them empowered to plan for each situation as it comes along.

For more information, read Career Planning for Teens with JRA, EDS, and Other Chronic Health Issues and Parents With Disabilities Need The Happiest Toddler on the Block Techniques . To read posts about children that have relevance for adults as well, read Why Joint Protection Solutions for Hypermobility Aren’t Your Granny’s Joint Protection Strategies and When Writing Hurts: The Hypermobile Hand .

Book Review From an OTR: Easy For You To Say Q and A’s for Teens Living with Chronic Illness or Disability

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If you are a teen with JRA, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, MD, paraplegia, or any of the many conditions that create daily challenges in your life, you need to read this book.

If you are the parent of a teen or tween with these medical conditions, you REALLY need to read this book.

Dr. Miriam Kaufman wrote the first edition of this book 25 years ago.  It has been updated and improved, IMHO.  It is honest and direct about issues that matter to teens.  She is specific about drug use, sex, intimate and social relationships, and the challenges of having these problems when you are still learning who you are and what you want in life.  Young adults would probably get a lot out of this book as well.  Sometimes illness and disability make launching yourself as an adult a slow and disconnected process.

What is inside?

Chapters 1 and 2 focus on family life and managing medicine and medical doctors.  Teens are trying to separate but still need and (sometimes) want family involvement as much as they want to grow into the amazing adults they are meant to be.

Chapters 3 and 4 talk about friends, dating, school, and work.  

Chapter 5 addresses alcohol, drugs, and medications.  She isn’t judge-y, and she knows that experimentation is likely with or without information.  She just wants teens to think things through so that they make choices based on more than rumor or whispered stories.

Chapter 6 discusses sexuality.  The teen I have treated care more about this topic than they care about almost any other, except dating and friendships.  Dr. Kaufman is honest, explicit without being insensitive, and hopeful.  No teen wants to hear that a satisfying sex life isn’t possible.  

Chapter 7 addresses recreation, and Chapter 8 discussed transitions into adulthood, including taking responsibility for your own healthcare.

Wait.  There is more.  Much more.

Pages 299-315 are appendices that offer you charts so that you can understand which drugs are known to cause acne, hairiness, decreased sexual desire, erectile problems, gynecomastia, affect birth control pills, and then there are pages and pages of explanations of how street drugs interact with therapeutic drugs.  

If you are a teen male and want to know why you have boobs now, or acne, or why sex is no longer the focus of every other thought…it is in here.  If you want to know how to talk to your parents or your doctor about your unwanted facial hair, or the hair “down there”…it is in here.

If you are a parent, and have no idea what yo say about drug use except “don’t”…this book has your back.

Is this book perfect?  No.  Dr. Kaufman doesn’t know some of the strategies and equipment that rehab therapists can suggest to make the physical aspects of sex easier or more pleasurable, or how to deal with getting around the halls and sitting/walking at school, a job, or in your own bathroom, and the chapter on school and work isn’t detailed enough for me as an OTR.  But she has provided a book that is more helpful than others I have seen, with more details than I knew about drug interactions (both legal and illegal usage) and how some drugs affect the effectiveness of birth control pills.  For her extensive appendices alone, this is a book to read and own.

Should You Use White Noise With Toddlers?

I teach The Happiest Baby on the Block techniques to calm newborns because it is based in science.  The science of neurology and early development.  But babies grow.  The 5 S’s, used all together, really don’t work much past 12 weeks of age.  Nobody is swaddling a 6-month old, or jiggling an 8-month old.

But you can use some of the principles of The Happiest Baby on the Block well past that 12-week mark to make life, and sleep, better for everyone. White noise is one of the S’s that is helpful for toddlers.

I wrote a popular post on white noise Are Babies Addicted to White Noise? Yes….and No  and I haven’t seen any reason to change a word. White noise both triggers the brain to think “time to sleep” and alters the level of alertness in a young children so they can drop into sleep.

For toddlers, white noise has an even more important role:  it muffles the sounds of family activity and scary household sounds.  Toddlers want to stay up to hang out with their parents and siblings.  They are old enough to understand that they go to sleep ALONE, that the party is over until morning.  Toddlers that are exceptionally social find this the hardest.  The other group that struggles is the children who are in daycare and only see their parents and siblings in the later afternoon and evenings.  A few hours of meals and bath simply aren’t enough for them, but they are tired and cranky.  Let the screaming begin….

Toddlers are also old enough to develop some fears.  Noises that they cannot identify may scare them.  Things like closing a squeaky door or running the dryer.  As adults, we don’t find these noises alarming.  Toddlers can and do get scared since their brains are able to conjure up fears from emerging imaginations.  White noise can block them all.

But you have to use the right type of white noise, and at the right volume.  Some toddlers need a stronger sound, not bubbling water in a brook.  They need a hairdryer sound.  Some need the heartbeat sound, but louder. Once a child is asleep, you can always switch to a lower, less intense sound.  Dr. Karp’s white noise album on iTunes has a variety of sounds that can be put on in sequence, or on repeat, to deliver that “just right” level of sensory input.

Think you should use music with singing instead?  Not for sleep.  Just like us, toddlers pay attention to the lyrics.  You might find lullabies that soothe, but they might be too stimulating to keep your toddler sleeping.  We go through sleep cycles, and leaving music on during the light sleep stage could wake them rather than send them back to sleep.

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