Monthly Archives: March 2018

For Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues, Add Resistance Instead of Hand-Over-Hand Assistance

 

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One of my most popular posts, Why “Hand-Over-Hand” Assistance Works Poorly With So Many Special Needs Children , explains how this common method of assisting children to hold and manipulate objects often results in rejection or even aversion.  This post tells you about my most successful strategy for kids with low muscle tone and limited sensory processing:  using graded resistance.

Why does making it harder to move work better?  Because if the child is actively trying to reach and grasp an object, you are providing more tactile, kinesthetic and proprioceptive information for their brain.  More information = better quality movement.  Your accurately graded resistance is doing what weighted/pressure vests, foot weights and SPIO suits do for the rest of their body.  Could you use a hand weight or weighted object?  Maybe, but little children have little hands with limited space to place a weight, and weights don’t distribute force evenly.  Did you take physics in school?  Then you know that gravity exerts a constant pressure in one direction.  Hands move in 3-D.  Oh, well.  So much for weighting things.

How do you know how much force to use?  Just enough to allow the child to move smoothly.  Its a dance in which you constantly monitor their effort and grade yours to allow movement to continue.

Where do you place the force?  That one is a little trickier.  It helps to have some knowledge of biomechanics, but I can tell you that it isn’t always on their hand.  Not because they won’t like it, but because it may not deliver the correct force. Often your force can be more proximal, meaning closer to the shoulder than the hand.  That would provide more information for the joints and muscles that stabilize the arm, steadying it so the hand can be guided accurately.   If a child has such a weak grasp that they cannot maintain a hold while pushing or pulling, you may be better off moving the object, not the hand,  while they hold the object, rather than holding their hand.

Still getting aversive responses from the child?  It may be because the child doesn’t want to engage in your activity, or they don’t realize that you are helping them.  They  may think that adults touch them to remove objects from their grasp or otherwise stop them from exploring.  Both can be true.  In that case, make sure that you are offering the child something that they want to do first.  Remember, we can’t force anyone to play.  The desire to engage has to come from them, or it isn’t play.  Its just adults making a kid do something that we think is good for them.

 

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One of the most amazing places I have ever seen:  Australia!

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How Hypermobility Affects Self-Image, Behavior and Activity Levels in Children

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Loose joints affect emotions and behavior too!

As rehab therapists, OTs and PTs are focused on skill building and reaching functional goals with our clients.  But feelings influence behavior, and so therapists have to be aware of more than joints and muscles when looking at function.  In this post, I would like to address the many ways that hypermobility can create social and emotional issues for children.  Without awareness of these experiences, we cannot be the best therapists for these kids, or help parents be the best advocates for their children.

Because hypermobility varies so widely in it’s severity, it’s presentation (generalized, primarily proximal, or primarily distal) and it’s progression (decreasing with age or increasing with repeated injuries and overstretching of tissues), the psychological impact on a child will also vary tremendously.  The child who has had significant and global hypermobility from birth will have a very different profile from the young teen who is only recently experiencing functional issues with instability or pain after years of sports-related injuries.

Here are some major points to consider:

  1. Hypermobility and it’s accompanying effect of stability and proprioceptive processing contribute to both sensory seeking and sedentary behavior, sometimes in the same child.  Add in pain and fatigue, and perhaps even POTS or dysautonomia, and you have a kid that is both active and inactive, both attentive and unfocused on tasks at different times of the day.  Self-regulation appears to be very unstable.  If a child’s entire physical condition isn’t taken into assessment, a referral for an ADHD diagnosis could result.
  2. Difficulties with mobility and stability make active play and engagement in sports more difficult.  This has social as well as physical effects on children at all ages.  For some kids, they can play but get injured at a more frequent rate.  Other children aren’t able to keep up with their peers on the playground and seek more sedentary or independent activities.  And for some other kids, they experience the pain of being the last kid picked for group play or being bullied for the awkward way they move.  The child that was more mobile and athletic when younger, and is now experiencing a loss of skill or an increase in pain, is also at risk for feelings of depression and fear of movement.  That fear is a real problem, with a name: kineseophobia.   This isn’t the same as gravitational insecurity, but it may look like it  to a clinician unless that therapist is aware of a child’s history or all of the current clinical problems.
  3. Kids with hypermobility can have problems with falling and staying asleep, which affects daytime alertness and energy.  It is well-documented that a lack of good-quality sleep results in childhood behavioral changes for typical kids.  Pain, lack of daytime activity levels high enough to trigger sleep, bladder control issues leading to nighttime awakening or bedwetting…the list of sleep issues for kids with hypermobility can be really long.  Evaluating a child’s behavior without knowing about these issues is going to lead to incorrect assumptions about the source of reactions and interactions.
  4. Hypermobile kids can have issues with feeding that contribute to patterns of behavior that extend beyond the dinner table.  Difficulty with eating, chewing, and even constipation can result in behavioral changes.  Crankiness is only the beginning.  Imagine being constantly constipated or gagging/choking on food.  Especially with younger kids, learning social interaction skills at the table can be lost in a parent’s need to alter food choice or their concerns over nutrition.  The development of persistent oppositional behavior can begin at the dinner table and spill over into all interactions.  Hypermobile kids don’t always have issues that restrict them from eating; some kids don’t get enough exercise or find eating to be a pleasurable activity that doesn’t take too much energy or skill.  Used along with media use or gaming, snacking is something that they enjoy.  The extra weight they carry makes movement more difficult and places extra force on joints.  But exercising in pain and fatigue isn’t an easy fix.
  5.  Children develop social and emotional skills in engagement with others.  The child who attends therapy instead of playdates, the tween that doesn’t have the stamina to go on a ski trip, the child who can’t sit still during a long play or movie.  All of these kids are having difficulties that reduce their social interactions to some degree.  Encourage the families of the children you treat to be mindful of a child’s whole life experiences and weave interventions into life, not life into interventions.

As therapists, we owe it to our clients to ask questions that help us understand the daily challenges of life and create treatment plans that support a child’s social and emotional development.  Waiting for mental health professionals to ask those questions isn’t enough.  And remember, if there is a counselor or therapist involved, share what you know about the impact of hypermobility on behavior.  Without awareness of the physiological and sensory basis of behavior, professionals may make an incomplete assessment that will not result in progress!

 

Looking for more information on treating kids with hypermobility?  Take a look at Can You Use The Wilbarger Protocol With Kids That Have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? , Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problem With Blankets  and Can You K-Tape Kids With Ehlers-Danlos and Other Connective Tissue Disorders?.

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OXO for Kids: Great Tableware For Older Kids With Sensory and Motor Issues

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Does your child knock over her milk on a daily basis?  Do utensils seem to fly out of your son’s hands?  I treat kids with hypermobility, coordination and praxis issues, sensory discrimination limitations, etc.; they can all benefit from this terrific line of cups, dinnerware and utensils.

Yes, OXO, the same people that sell you measuring cups and mixing bowls: they have a line of children’s products.  Their baby and toddler items are great, but no 9 year-old wants to eat out of a “baby plate”.

OXO’s items for older kids don’t look or feel infantile.   The simple lines hide the great features that make them so useful to children with challenges:

  1. The plates and bowls have non-slip bases.  Those little nudges that have other dinnerware flipping over aren’t going to tip these items over so easily.
  2. The cups have a colorful grippy band that helps little hands hold on, and the strong visual cue helps kids place their hands in the right spot for maximal control.
  3. The utensils have a larger handle to provide more tactile, proprioceptive and kinesthetic input while eating.  Don’t know what that is?  Don’t worry!  It means that your child gets more multi-sensory information about what is in her hand so that it stays in her hand.
  4. The dinnerware and the cups can handle being dropped, but they have a bit more weight (thus more sensory feedback) than a paper plate/cup or thin plastic novelty items.
  5. There is nothing about this line that screams “adaptive equipment”.  Older kids are often very sensitive to being labeled as different, but they may need the benefits of good universal design.  Here it is!
  6. All of them are dishwasher-safe.  If you have a child with special needs, you really don’t want to be hand-washing dinnerware if you don’t have to.

For more information about mealtime strategies, please take a look at Which Spoon Is Best To Teach Grown-Up Grasp? and Teach Spoon Grip By Making It Fun And Sharing a Laugh With Your Child.

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Parenting Experts: Check Your Privilege

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Zero-To-Three just ran this summary on their Facebook page MIT language study and I felt so sad.  For everyone.  For the umpteenth time in the past few years, I am in the awkward position of agreeing with “experts” that kids learn language skills best with face-to-face interaction that expands language, but I also appreciate why some cultures don’t interact with children like MIT researchers want them to.  My concern is that the  researchers can’t seem to see beyond their (boojie) bubble.

Because I have the good fortune to treat children in their homes, and have family and friends that span every economic group from barely-getting-by to (almost) Richie Rich, I have seen a lot of parenting styles.  A lot.  Here is what I see:

Parents teach children to behave so that they will succeed in the culture their parents exist in and the world they hope their children will access.  How parents interact with their children is also affected by how stressed they are.  No parent thinks about this consciously.  But there are huge differences, right from the start.

What I think the MIT folks haven’t realized is what goes on for those parents who come home after working two jobs, who worry about which bills to pay now and if they will have a job this time next month. These good, hardworking folks don’t have the extra bandwidth to chat with their children in the same way that a less stressed parent does.  Maybe the researchers haven’t thought to ask, maybe they assume that what they see in an interview tells the whole story.  But they haven’t seen these families in their own homes and how they live their lives.

When that proud, super-stressed, working-class parent thinks about their child’s future, they see a job with benefits, a job that can’t be outsourced, a job that has automatic raises.  Many of the jobs they dream about for their children are government or union jobs.  These jobs require obedience to rules and to supervisors.  In these positions, telling your boss that he or she is wrong could cost you your job.  Staying out of controversy and following the rules gets you to the next rung on the ladder.

When their child questions a request, they aren’t going to have a heart-to-heart with him about why they don’t want to unload the dishwasher.  A parent wants it done because they need to do three loads of laundry immediately and won’t be done with it until 2 am tonight.  Everyone in their family has to help to make tomorrow a possibility.  And they want their child to know that refusal to follow a supervisor’s order could mean that they could be out of a job and maybe out of a home.

Someday there will be someone at MIT that learns more about these families, is brave enough to say what they think, and maybe even publish a study.  That will be something that I can’t wait to post on my blog!

Should Your Hypermobile Child Play Sports?

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Kids with hypermobility fall on a very wide spectrum.  Some are strong and flexible, allowing them to compete in gymnastics and dance with ease or even excellence.  Some kids are prone to injury; they spend more time on the sidelines than on the field.  And some need to have P.E. classes adapted for them or substituted with physical therapy.

Wherever your child lands on this spectrum of ability, it is likely that they want to be able to participate in sports, and you want them to be able to do so as well.  Engaging in sports delivers a lot of positives:  conditioning, ability to work in a group, ability to achieve goals and handle failure/loss, etc.  Most therapists and doctors will say that being as physically active as possible enhances a child’s overall wellness and can be protective. But every child is different, and therefore every solution has to be tailored to the individual.

Here are a few questions to guide your assessment  (and involve your child the  decision, if they are old enough to be reflective instead of reactive to questions):

  1. Is this activity a high or low-risk choice?  High-risks would include heavy physical contact, such as football.  Tennis requires hitting a ball with force and rapid shifts of position with lots of rotation of the trunk and limbs.  I am going out on a limb, and say that ballet on-pointe is a high-risk choice for kids with lower-body weakness and instability.  The question of risk in any activity has to be combined with what is risky for each child.
  2. Will endurance be an issue, or will there be flexible breaks?  Activities that require a lot of running, such as soccer and lacrosse, may be harder than dance classes.
  3. Are there ways to support performance, such as braces, kineseotaping or equipment modifications?  A great pair of skis or shoes can help tremendously in sports.  So can targeted exercises from a physical therapist or a well-trained coach that understands the needs of the hypermobile athlete.  Your child may not be able to be on a travel team due to the intense demands and greater risk of injury due to fatigue/strain, but be very satisfied being on a local team.
  4. Will your child report pain or injury and ask for assistance?  Some kids are very proactive, and some will try to hide injuries to stay in the game or on the team.  Without this knowledge, no coach or parent is able to make the right/safe choices.  Sometimes it’s an age thing, where young children aren’t good communicators or teens are defending their independence at the cost of their health.  If you think that your child will hide injuries or push themselves past what is safe for their joints, you will have to think long and hard about the consequences of specific activities.
  5. Within a specific sport, are there positions or types of participation that are well-suited for your child’s skills and issues?  Skiing wide green (easy) slopes and doing half-pipe snowboard tricks are at distinct ends of the spectrum, but a hypermobile child may be quite happy to be out there in any fashion without pain or injury.  Goalies are standing for longer periods but running/skating less.  Endurance running and sprinting have very different training and participation requirements.
  6. Sadly, hypermobility can progressively reduce participation in sports.  Not for all kids, and not even for kids with current issues.  Children can actually be less hypermobile at 12 than they were at 3.  They build muscle strength as well.   It happens.  Therapy and other strategies like nutrition and orthotics can make huge improvements for hypermobile kids who want to play sports.  But too often, the child who is pain-free in dance class at 7 isn’t pain-free at 14.  This doesn’t have to be a tragedy.  Kids can be supported to adjust and adapt so that they are playing and working at their current maximal level.  Good physical or occupational therapists can help you figure out how to make athletic activities fun and safe!

For more information regarding hypermobility, please read Hypermobile Kids, Sleep, And The Hidden Problem With Blankets ,  Can You K-Tape Kids With Connective Tissue Disorders?  and Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork?.

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