Monthly Archives: September 2017

A Simple Strategy To Improve Your Child’s Posture In A Tripp Trapp or Special Tomato Chair

 

Therapists often recommend these well-designed seats for kids that need solid foot support, but even the best hip and chest strapping doesn’t always mean that a child is actively using their feet for postural control.

As a young therapist, I used tape, foam, and towel rolls everywhere, as if I was creating a modern sculpture.  For the most part, all I got for my effort was frustration.  Food and force tend to make short work of the most ingenious wedges and supports on a chair used for feeding.  Then I got smarter and decided to make this a lot easier on everyone.

I wanted to share my easiest strategy for helping children place their feet on a foot plate and keep them there:  shoes!

IMG_1290

 

The little guy in the “before” photo has generalized low tone and hypermobility.  His pelvis is reasonably stable using the existing straps on the chair, and he is able to reach forward to finger-feed, partially activating his trunk and hips.  But those feet just tapped away, and his legs extended at the knee through most of the meal.  He is too little to respond to any verbal prompts for posture but not addicted to gaining sensory input though his feet.  He is there for the food!

IMG_1289

Non-skid soles, and totally stylish, too!

Just putting on his tiny boat shoes gives him some “grip” on the foot plate, and he stayed in this position for the rest of the meal with our repositioning!  He still has to develop some hip control so his knees don’t move laterally as he reaches forward.  This is an easy hack to help him get some distal stability without constantly touching and repositioning him.  Kids really start to hate all our manhandling after a while.

Hope this gives parents and therapists an idea that requires very little effort and can  deliver results immediately!

Advertisements

Help Your Special Needs Toddler Make The Transition To School Routines

 

wu-yi-302799.jpg

 

Many developmentally delayed toddlers move their therapeutic and educational services to a toddler developmental group, A.K.A. special needs program, when they are between 18 and 30 months old.  Not all of them slide into the routine easily.  There can be a few tears and a lot of complaining about fitting into a schedule /leaving a fun activity because it is time for circle or therapy.

After speaking with a handful of clients and doing a few consultations, I thought it might help to provide some strategies to help parents make their child’s first school experience easier:

  1. Learn how teachers mark activity transitions, and commit to using them at home.  Some teachers sing the  “clean-up song”, some ring a bell or turn lights on and off.  Find out exactly how the staff help children, especially non-verbal children, anticipate and adjust to changes.
  2.  You don’t need to copy the exact transition strategy, but make it very similar and use it for activities at home that are the easy transitions.  Examples of easy transitions at home are getting into a bubbly tub, leaving the table once full and satisfied, putting on a coat to go outside and play, etc.  The transitions that are easiest are going to be the calmest, and children learn best when calm.  This positive spin makes the school’s routine more acceptable when a child isn’t completely on board with new situations.
  3. Find out how snack is served, and offer snacks in the same way at home.  If small cups are used for water or juice, practice cup drinking at home with the same sized cup.   If there are specific foods offered, then stock up.   Model your enjoyment of these snacks so that the food is familiar and has your seal of approval.

Good luck this year to all the toddlers that have made the leap to school!!

 

Should Hypermobile Kids Sit On Therapy Balls For Schoolwork?

 

frank-mckenna-184340.jpg

They are everywhere; colorful therapy balls have migrated from the clinic to the classroom.  You can buy a base or a whole chair with a ball attached.  But do kids with hypermobility benefit from using them, or will they create more problems than they solve?

Hypermobility in infants and very young children is common, and decreases over time in typical children.  And then there are the kids with low muscle tone or connective tissue disorders.  These kids do not commonly see a decrease in their loose joints over time.  They do become stronger, and they can become more stable and steady.  But they can still display considerable flexibility over time.

In fact, hypermobility can increase with each overstretched ligament or damaged joint.  It is as simple as basic construction principles:  when the foundation is shaky, the structures around the foundation receive some of the forces from action and movement that the foundation should have absorbed.  A child who has an unstable pelvis will experience more forces in their upper spine and in their knees as the muscles try to compensate for the extra movement at the pelvis.  Over-stretching, excessive tightening of the wrong structures, and damage to joint surfaces are the result of excessive force absorption.

In this situation, another symptom becomes more and more obvious:  fatigue.  Well-aligned joints are designed to decrease effort during movement, like a Swiss clock.  Damaged joints and joints that don’t glide correctly due to lax ligaments and weak muscles require more effort to do the same job.  Hence fatigue sets in just from the extra effort required.  This is true even if the connective tissue that creates muscles and ligaments is of good quality.  Some genetic connective tissue disorders are characterized by incomplete or faulty construction of connective tissue.  These children are starting out with a foundation that is unstable and weak before any forces have been applied.  They will become weak and tired more quickly than a child with the same level of instability but with stronger connective tissue.

While sitting on a therapy ball-chair, the expectation is that the dynamic movement of the ball will activate core musculature and provide a dynamic position that helps a child  achieve core stability.  Sounds great!  But…this assumes that the physical structures needed are capable of doing so, and that the child is also able to write or play, using his arms and hands effectively at the same time.  It also assumes that the child will notice when his alignment has decreased and will take action to prevent compensation.  I think that is a lot to ask of most kids, even most teens.  They just want to get their homework done and over.

Based on all of these concerns, I recommend that children with hypermobility be closely evaluated and monitored by a therapist before they use a therapy ball set-up as a chair for play or schoolwork.  The extra effort to sustain and achieve good alignment is likely to be difficult to manage as they concentrate on a task like handwriting.  The risk is that they fatigue the supporting musculature, recruit compensatory muscles for support, and place more strain on joints and ligaments without awareness.  Yes, I am saying that there is a chance that the use of these chairs with some kids can make things worse.

A better idea for kids with hypermobility?  A more supportive seating set-up.  Reduce the physical demands while your child is working, and leave exercising on a ball to therapy sessions and your therapy home program.  Therapists are skilled at designing programs that target specific muscles to develop balanced control around a joint while protecting it at the same time.  They are also great at assessing work stations and chairs to determine which designs will give your child support and dynamic positioning at the same time without excessive fatigue.  This is one of my favorite tasks as an OT.  I know that a well-designed seating set-up will provide a pay-off every time a child sits down for a meal, plays at a table, or does their homework.  Sometimes it means that joint protection and support have to be blanked with dynamic control, and my training helps families to parse it out for the best result possible for their child.

Looking for more ideas with your hypermobile child?  Check out Hypermobility and ADHD? Take Stability, Proprioception, Pain and Fatigue Into Account Before Labeling Behavior and Should Hypermobile Kids Use Backpacks? to start the school year.

I am working on a new e-book on hyper mobility, and welcome parents and therapists to suggest topics that are rarely discussed online or in the clinic.  My goal is to create a book that helps kids thrive!

 

 

Halloween Fun When Kids Don’t or Can’t Trick-Or-Treat

 

valario-davis-300559

Kids big and little are anticipating Halloween, but this holiday isn’t always enjoyable for children with ASD, SPD, anxiety or motor issues.  Putting on a costume can be difficult for some kids to tolerate and nearly impossible for kids that have mobility issues.  Kids with endurance and mobility issues struggle to walk up to a front door and ring the bell, but they don’t want to be carried “like a baby”.  Even seeing other children in costume or decorations in their own home can be difficult for children that are very sensitive.

What begins as a celebration and an adventure becomes a minefield.  And yet, your child may be invited to participate in many Halloween events.  You may want to have a party in your own home.  Your child may even beg to be involved in things you know they will end up hating, not realizing the challenges ahead.  Inclusion is a murky pond for some kids.

Perhaps it doesn’t have to be so difficult.  Here are a few ideas that could make this holiday less stressful and more inclusive:

  • Costumes can be anything you want them to be.  Purchased costumes can be adapted or altered for comfort and tolerance.  If you have a child with tactile sensitivity, choosing the fabric that is less irritating is worth a trip to a brick-and-mortar store, or ordering multiple sets online with easy returns.  Instead of an eye patch for a pirate, you can use makeup to create one.  Princess skirts and Batman pants can be shortened to prevent tripping.  They can be bought larger and altered to allow for braces and for sitting in a wheelchair.  Hats and headpieces are optional, and can also be switched out for more wearable choices.  They can be purchased separately or by combining two costumes.  A comfortable costume is fun; an awkward costume will cost you in time, pain and struggle much more than you can imagine.
  • Trick-or-treat is over-rated.  Choose people your child knows, a neighborhood that has flat, accessible front steps, or even an apartment building with an elevator.  The experience of trick-or-treat doesn’t have to be a marathon to be fun: in fact, “fun” is the opposite of dragging stressed children around from house to house.  Remember that children with sensory modulation issues will start out excited and happy and become overwhelmed quickly.  Monitoring and planning for this helps both of you have fun that doesn’t end badly.
  • Many children with sensitivities need to practice wearing their costume until it becomes familiar.  They may protest and initially refuse, but some practice can really help them.  Make the run-through more fun by pairing it with something like watching a halloween movie at home or putting up decorations.  The child that refuses to wear a costume can become the child who doesn’t want to take it off!
  • Choose your home decorations with your child’s tolerance in mind.  It isn’t always about whether they are scary or not, it can be the brightness, the amount of movement or the sounds that overwhelm children.  You won’t always know what will be too much, so prepare yourself and the rest of the family that you may have to substitute/remove/repurpose things that don’t work out.
  • Do fun events that your child can handle.  Bake cookies, including the buy-and-bake-off cookies that don’t require a lot of effort or time.  The end product can be given to friends and family proudly.  Decorate a Halloween cookie house.  Put up cling-on decorations in windows and storm doors that are easy to remove if they become an issue.  Watch a fun movie at home and invite friends to dress up and come over for the show.

Holidays for kids with special needs take more thought, but they don’t have to be less fun, just a bit different.  The important concept is to consider your child’s needs and aim for the essential feelings of the holiday:  fun, and sharing the fun with others!

When Your Gifted Child Is A Perfectionist

 

olivier-fahrni-337130

Do you know a child who is always trying to get to “perfect”?  Being called a perfectionist is almost universally a criticism in our society.  It doesn’t have to be.  Some kids that are reaching for the ultimate aren’t unnecessarily stressing them selves out.  They may gifted.

The gifted child is capable of seeing what others do not.  They envision a wider and deeper experience, a more complete artistic expression, a better-turned phrase.  And they demand a chance to achieve it.  In this way, perfecting their performance or product isn’t psychological struggle, it is accomplishing what they can imagine.

A gifted child may not beat himself up for not immediately achieving his vision, but he may not leave well enough alone.  He may not have to.  Given the chance, he may work happily on his project for hours or days or even months, not really minding the process that requires failures and one-offs.  This should give you a clue to the source of your child’s persistence;  the gifted enjoy the process as much as the product.  This is very different from the child who tears up a picture in frustration.  There are no tears from a gifted child, but there may not be any negotiation.  They cannot leave their work in it’s current state, knowing that a better outcome is right around the corner.

What if the picture or term paper is due on Tuesday?

Give your gifted child the gift of understanding and teach them that deadlines also have value.  Living in our society requires the gifted child to bend to fit, but not break.  They can continue to work on their project when it is returned to them, or they can accept that reaching the perfect state the they see is something that doesn’t happen with every endeavor.

Let them enjoy the creative process, as this is the true joy for them.  Gifted children need your help to learn how to navigate the wider world, where often their modest efforts are celebrated.  They know that they can do more, but if they can shift off of a demand for perfection in some things, they can reach the heights of their abilities in other experiences.