Monthly Archives: July 2014

Do Fathers Matter? NYT Reviews the Question

The NYT has reviewed a new book, “Do Fathers Matter” by Paul Raeburn. The assumption is that they make unique contributions to their children’s lives before, during, and after conception.

This book explores the science behind this belief. Some researchers are studying the benefits that come from having involved and caring men in children’s lives. Equally interesting are the effects of paternal age and health at conception. New studies suggest that male health is an important consideration in fertility and risk for a wide range of issues. The effects of a fathers’ parenting style in early childhood to affect behavior in adolescence and adulthood is worth considering. No one doubts this, but seeing the research clarifies why we should care deeply about a father’s role in a child’s life.

This book appears to bring social, psychological and biological research together in a readable form, so I will be eager to take a look this summer!

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Father’s Day Book Review: The Art of Roughhousing

I know, I know; do you really need a book to tell you why and how to toss your son in the air so he screams with joy? Maybe. Anthony T.DeBenedet, M.D. and Lawrence J. Cohen, Ph.D have written a fun and quite comprehensive manual for you. You will learn why roughhousing is good for your child’s emotional and social health, and when to say when. Most moms are hoping that part is included.
Pediatric occupational therapists will totally support the recommendation to closely observe your child and match/manage the action for safety and mutual enjoyment. Children with sensory processing issues generally love roughhousing but aren’t particularly good at managing their excitement. Here’s your manual for figuring that part into your plan.

The Book spends the first 34 of it’s 190 pages explaining why these dads love roughhousing and the theory of how roughhousing helps families. They are clear about setting limits for safety, but open to very creative play. That’s when the real excitement starts. They use useful illustrations and step-by-step descriptions of moves like the Ninja Warrior and the Magic Carpet Ride. Moves are categorized by level of difficulty and some essential skills needed to execute them. Hint: you will need to be in fairly good shape for most of these. Parenting at this level is going to be all the excuse you need to get to the gym.

Parents who would like to understand the science behind roughhousing and/or need some creative ideas to start the fun will get the most out of this little volume!